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What are Divas reading?

heather matthews

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I'm loving All the light we cannot see by Anthony Doerr.So far it's beautiful, tragic, sad and Ive become really invested in the characters. Its a biggish book but the chapters are short so recapping when you fall asleep reading is easy!!
 

Tvan

Angel Diva
I'm loving All the light we cannot see by Anthony Doerr.So far it's beautiful, tragic, sad and Ive become really invested in the characters. Its a biggish book but the chapters are short so recapping when you fall asleep reading is easy!!
I enjoyed it, too. Have you read “A Gentleman in Moscow”? Different story but similar vibe.
 

MI-skier

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Just spent some time on the beach reading these three. Proteinaholic appealed to my clinic side (NF-How we are overdosing on meat protein and the myths associated with it), Girl with Seven Names appealed to my cultural side (NF of a North Korean girl and her amazing journey to escape. I'm also Korean) and finally the big one, Man's Search for Meaning appealed to my philosophical side IMG_20180225_164341237.jpg (NF of Victor Frankl's ordeal surviving the concentration camps as both a prisoner and pyschiatrist/neurologist and founder of logotherapy). As much as I read I rarely buy books cuz I'd go broke. I will buy Man's Search so I can read and re-read again. Beautiful book.
 
@MI-skier - Viktor Frankl is one of my psychologist-heroes. He called it logotherapy, but he is known now as the father of existential psychotherapy - therapy addressing the existential question of what is our purpose, what is the meaning we make of life.

Here's a lovely clip adopted by the folks at TED talks, although Frankl died in 1997, long before there were TED talks.

https://www.ted.com/talks/viktor_frankl_youth_in_search_of_meaning
 
Haven't read it, but the biography of Elizabeth Hawley sounds fascinating. She died in January 2018 at age 94. She spent most of her life in Nepal documenting climbs on Everest. There was a documentary film made about her that was released in 2013 that won some independent film awards. She was not a climber at all. She was a journalist overseas when it was unusual for woman to be journalists.

https://misadventuresmag.com/11463-2/

This interview from 2016 when she was 92 gives some flavor of Miss Hawley's no-nonsense personality.

http://adventureblog.nationalgeogra...cler-elizabeth-hawley-92-tells-it-like-it-is/
 
Haven't read it, but the biography of Elizabeth Hawley sounds fascinating. She died in January 2018 at age 94. She spent most of her life in Nepal documenting climbs on Everest. There was a documentary film made about her that was released in 2013 that won some independent film awards. She was not a climber at all. She was a journalist overseas when it was unusual for woman to be journalists.

https://misadventuresmag.com/11463-2/

This interview from 2016 when she was 92 gives some flavor of Miss Hawley's no-nonsense personality.

http://adventureblog.nationalgeogra...cler-elizabeth-hawley-92-tells-it-like-it-is/

 
I was spurred to start reading The Terror by the current show on AMC. The crew of a mid-19th century Royal Naval expedition searching for the Northwest Passage get stuck in the ice in Baffin Bay. All kinds of mayhem results.
 

tinymoose

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I just started reading Ross Poldark; first book in the Poldark series. Really loved the TV show and so far I enjoy the show and book more than Outlander. I keep fizzling out trying to read the Outlander series, although I've enjoyed the show enough.
 

tinymoose

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I was spurred to start reading The Terror by the current show on AMC. The crew of a mid-19th century Royal Naval expedition searching for the Northwest Passage get stuck in the ice in Baffin Bay. All kinds of mayhem results.
I need to watch more of this show. Have only seen the first episode so far.
 

Jenny

Angel Diva
Currently reading Bowerman and the Men of Oregon

No man has affected more runners in more ways than Bill Bowerman. During his 24-year tenure as track coach at the University of Oregon, he won four national team titles and his athletes set 13 world and 22 American records. He also ignited the jogging boom, invented the waffle-sole running shoe that helped establish Nike, and coached the US track and field team at the 1972 Munich Olympic Games

@nopoleskier, @newboots - There’s an extremely interesting chapter all about the 10th Mountain Division, its conception, and its time in Italy at Riva Ridge.
 

Olesya Chornoguz

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I finally read Handmaid's Tale. I was afraid to read it because I thought it would terrify me and give anxiety. I'm glad I read it because it's an amazing book. I also read Looking for Alaska which was also really sad, but really good. Now I'm reading White Planet which is a collection of stories about skiing written by Powder magazine editor.
 
Just finished listening to "Driving Miss Norma" on the drive up to Boston. It's an amazing story that anyone who has ever done or thought about eldercare should read. The way the story is told is very well thought out.

https://www.missnorma.com/get-the-book

My parents didn't need much help until they were around 95. I was lucky because my mother had planned well in advance, starting when they were in their 70s. Plus I lived close to them. That's not that common these days.
 

MI-skier

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Was not a huge fan of Melissa Gilbert's uber popular, "Eat, Pray, Love" so hesitantly began reading "Signature of All Things" based on a friend's recommendation. I enjoyed it and would recommend. Beautifully written. A book on a woman born in the 1800s who living in a man's world grows up dedicating her life to botany yet tangles with the issues we all face. Trying to find her place in the world, will she ever discover love and satisfaction?
 

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