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Sizing down extra in boots

SnowHot

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
So you’re calling me “this”, how inhumane are you? People here just don’t like someone who’s beliefs and LIFE EXPERIENCE aren’t identical to their own.
You asked for advice then rejected it because you're not willing to accept any information.
Why did you ask?
I'm asking sincerely.
I am always looking for intel on how to be a better bootfitter and this kind of thing is helpful.

From my point of view, you asked and then dismissed everyting offered.
 

Trailside Trixie

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
That’s like going to a car lot and letting someone who’s knowledgable about cars tell you what to buy… and of course they’ll make adjustments for free when you’re paying 2-300 more for the initial pair. Boot fitters didn’t go to a literal school ha and aren’t magical, half are literally just working in a ski shop as a second job….. but that’s cool if you prefer to only buy from them and put all your faith in them. Also I never said Nordicas were for groomers those are known for being good all around the mountain, I said technica mach 1 105’s are reviewed by experts (people who I trust most then your local bootfitter) as being better on groomers then in powder. It’s not memorizing facts it’s reading about ‘experts’ -experiences and descriptions combined with real life personal use. I’ve had 2 boot fitters at the same location recommend total different flex ratings for me ha. Trial and error is the best method

Sniffs bait ... and swims away!
 

Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
You asked for advice then rejected it because you're not willing to accept any information.
Why did you ask?
I'm asking sincerely.
I am always looking for intel on how to be a better bootfitter and this kind of thing is helpful.

From my point of view, you asked and then dismissed everyting offered.
I didn’t ask for advice or even make this post? This is someone else’s post that I commented initially “glad to hear that someone who wears a 8.5 street shoe can make 23.5 size work” since that was my plan anyways.
 

Trailside Trixie

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
You’re the only troll here

You have been nothing but antagonistic when people are trying to help you.

Why are you even on here if you are an expert and know everything.

I just can't with this, we've all made mistakes when we haven't been skiing a long time but the worst thing someone can do is claim to know everything.

I'm sorry you haven't had great bootfitting experiences.

Again, Good luck.
 
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Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I didn’t ask for advice or even make this post? This is someone else’s post that I commented initially “glad to hear that someone who wears a 8.5 street shoe can make 23.5 size work” since that was my plan anyways.
M
You are exhibiting classic troll behavior and have been nothing but antagonistic when people are trying to help you.

Why are you even on here if you are an expert and know everything.

We're all moving on and you can troll to your hearts content.
Because you and maybe 1 other (not snowhot since she at least has kept it kind) sound like arrogant know it alls with the “I’m right your wrong” mentality. I never asked for or needed help. Antagonistic as in defending myself/my ideas and calling you the same thing that I was called? Hilarious. Later ✌
 

Trailside Trixie

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
M

Because you and maybe 1 other (not snowhot since she at least has kept it kind) sound like arrogant know it alls with the “I’m right your wrong” mentality. I never asked for or needed help. Antagonistic as in defending myself/my ideas and calling you the same thing that I was called? Hilarious. Later ✌

The old adage The man who represents himself has a fool for a client is very apropos

I'm sorry you've had bad bootfitting experiences but researching boots isn't like researching which TV to buy.

We've all been kind and noone is arrogant. Any grief you got here was self fulfilling. unfortunately. If you revisit this thread after you've more experience under your belt perhaps you'll realize.

This is a wonderful and helpful group of ladies.

Moving on.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
Let's try to take a step back. We can have our own strong opinions on boot fitting.

I get it - Rachel, it sounds like you've got a combination of feet that can tolerate stock boots and the time and determination to save money as your top priority. It's great that's working for you. It typically does NOT work for people with difficult feet. And many, if not most of us, don't have the patience to buy, modify, and resell boots until we can get it right on our own, even if it is possible to do that cost effectively.

Many of us know from painful experience just how bad the wrong boots are, and know that it can get to the point where it can cause permanent damage to your feet. I know multiple people who've needed surgery from wearing ill-fitting footwear (ski boots in particular), and that makes any extra money spent on fitting seem insignificant. When I found a true master bootfitter and was able to ski pain-free again, the (not insignificant) cost of those boots felt like a bargain. If you've never had that kind of foot pain, I'm sure it's hard to understand. Consider yourself lucky. But try to understand not everyone is that lucky, and those who have challenging feet do become very devoted to our expert bootfitters because they can end up being the difference between being able to ski or having to stop. We're really not just trying to convince everyone to waste money, we just think hey, I'd have appreciated someone explaining this to me earlier in my journey.... If you don't need it, that's great - you are a lucky one.
 

TiffAlt

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I want to add that you can indeed take courses and become certified in boot fitting. There's a whoe Masterfit University. We also can't forget the wisdom that comes from experience.

It is a sad reality that many stores just put salespeople out there and call them boot fitters. They are doing a disservice to both customers and actual qualified boot fitters. I know. I went to one of these "boot sellers". I was then fortunate enough to find a qualified boot fitter. If multiple experiences have been with "boot sellers", I can see why someone would become jaded and it would not be something they'd want to repeat.

To the qualified boot fitters like @SnowHot :hail: - thank you for the service you give us. My skiing, enjoyment and confidence went up so much after I fixed my boot issues. It really helped open up the sport for me.
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
Mod note:

Ladies, let's keep this civil. Please be respectful. There's a lot of good info here, and I'd hate to shut this discussion down. I'm keeping an eye on things. If there's a hint of any more untoward behavior, I'm going to have to pull the plug.
 
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nopoleskier

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
@SnowHot checked my foot out a couple of years ago, mine is pretty normal, high arch, wide toe area, since I've never been to a boot fitter, she was a wealth of knowledge, extremely interesting and super helpful. I had no idea the nuances that go into finding the right boot. I highly recommend having someone that understands 'feet' and boots along with being a real deal skier to talk too.
PS I really need new boots, my current probably have 300 days on them, fat socks and power straps aren't cutting it. I put off buying because I know how painful, stressful, money$$$ful buying new boots can be. Maybe I'll wait and hope that Snowhot is in town when I show up in Reno later this season.. Trusting who you get your intel from is major to me :-)
 

teppaz

Angel Diva
@SnowHot checked my foot out a couple of years ago, mine is pretty normal, high arch, wide toe area, since I've never been to a boot fitter, she was a wealth of knowledge, extremely interesting and super helpful. I had no idea the nuances that go into finding the right boot. I highly recommend having someone that understands 'feet' and boots along with being a real deal skier to talk too.
PS I really need new boots, my current probably have 300 days on them, fat socks and power straps aren't cutting it. I put off buying because I know how painful, stressful, money$$$ful buying new boots can be. Maybe I'll wait and hope that Snowhot is in town when I show up in Reno later this season.. Trusting who you get your intel from is major to me :-)
My trip to Tahoe coincided with her being in town, and I got new boots. As it turns out, my old ones were a full mondo size too big. The new ones fit so well that I got over my aversion to pink and bought them. (She says the color is strawberry milkshake — ladies: it's exactly the color in this classic number.)
 

diymom

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Ooh, you got the S-pro boa? You'll have to report back on the boa vs. buckles. I tried some boas on at the ski show and am intrigued. And for any spring skiing wackiness, I now fully expect you to be wearing a pink boa to go with your pink boas.
 

SnowHot

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
My trip to Tahoe coincided with her being in town, and I got new boots. As it turns out, my old ones were a full mondo size too big. The new ones fit so well that I got over my aversion to pink and bought them. (She says the color is strawberry milkshake — ladies: it's exactly the color in this classic number.)
You not only took ownership of the boot, you took ownership of the pink!Screenshot 2024-02-10 at 7.48.15 AM.png
 
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NewEnglandSkier

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I think the services of a great bootifitter is very helpful, esp if you have hard to fit feet. Unfortunately, it can be difficult to find a great fitter--that's part of the problem. Thankfully since my feet are not that difficult aside from being narrow, it hasn't been that that big a deal that I have yet to find someone that great. (they measure 85mm unweighted and 90/91mm weighted from what I can measure, measure 24.5 mondo, average instep I think and ankle measure like 21.5cm around---so low volume.) My very first pair of boots years ago ended up being huge despite going to a respected ski shop to buy boots (they sold me a 102mm lasted boot when I need a 98mm!!!). Next pair I knew more so I ended up closer to what I needed but still not quite right. Third pair was great on paper but ended up not being a good match for my leg (a fitter also put me into those). Fourth pair a well respected fitter in VT put me into and they lasted for years before any packing out--was sorry to see those go. Current pair the "fitting" was a bit of a disaster and I sort of had to DIY the fitting appointment (made appointment with fitter I wanted/had previously worked with--when got to the shop I got passed off to someone else who didn't seem interested in the appointment/seemed like they just wanted to sell a boot. Keep in mind I had driven 3 hours for this privilege. No shell fit, initially brought out my measured size which of course were huge given my foot volume so I told him he needed to bring out 23.5s instead. I basically tried on every low volume boot they had starting with Lange Shadow LV 115 (too much room at instep and foot), Nordica Promachine can't recall which flex (tongue caused pain on my shins just standing in the boots), Tecnica Mach1 LV (can't recall what I didn't like about that--I think instep maybe felt large), K2 Anthem 105 Boa (away to much volume in boot overall) and another K2 from a previous year that had traditional buckles (still way too much volume), Solomon S/Pro Alpha 110 (felt tight but not painful--best fit of all the boots. but that shop could not guarantee they could get the alpine soles instead of grip walk and since some of my bindings are not GW compatible that was a deal breaker.

I left and went up the street to a diff shop to see if they had anything in Atomic I could try since previous shop didn't carry Atomic.
They said I could do a Redster (not sure which model they had in mind), not sure why they didn't bring out a Hawks Ultra as that seemed like it could be an option, instead brought out the Salomon Alpha again. I tried the Alpha again--still liked the fit. Told them--full disclosure--I just tried these in another shop and the only reason I didn't get them was they couldn't get the alpine soles. Well this shop had the alpine soles in stock--so I bought the boots there. I mean I probably should have tried the Redster, but honestly by that time I was just done with boots and really by that time didn't want to deal with what I assumed would be a cold race liner and was just done with the whole experience overall just annoyed by the fact that I drove 3 hours for what I ultimately could have done 10 min from home at the local shop!

Anyway I will keep trying to find a fitter I like and who will take the time to find the right boot, but just a long winded way of saying that I can see where those who don't use fitters are coming from. It's not always so easy despite best intentions.
 

badger

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
PRICE should never be the foremost criterion when shopping for a boot. Settling for an " It'll work " fit into a boot with a lower pricetag, just puts you back where you started , costing double the original expense. A boot is supporting and leveraging the entire lower half of one's body on a skinny board. That boot function is critical.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I mean, that's the thing. Back in the day, I tried buying boots because the literature and reviews said they sounded right for me. They were intolerable, and it was a total waste of money, and ski days finding out how terrible they were. It wasn't possible to modify them to work for me, as it turned out, and they just got sold at a swap at a near total loss. I learned the hard way that any extra money spent on bootfitting is way more likely money saved than money wasted.
I have ditched 10 pair of boots, most of which were picked by me, myself, and I because ALL I considered was just how low-volume they were. I did get some not so awesome advice from some pretty qualified fitters, but the one variable that was never explored was cuff height. Brett Amsbury addressed that last fall and I’m tickled!!
I’d rather kick myself than want to kick a boot fitter over some boots I don’t like.
Fair enough. I get this thought process.

With that, can you measure your feet at their widest, as well as your instep and ankle circumference? I’m the lowest of low volume and my feet swam in the ProMachine 105 after I skied them a few times.
 

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