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Never ending boot saga continues

SquidWeaselYay

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Been there, done that, in two boots. It can be ground; maybe no need to punch. I forget, are you in Tecnica LV Mach1 boots? If so, I am too, and this spot had to be ground out for me.

Prior boots, Atomic Redsters, also had to be ground out there. I waited too long and had issue with the middle center of my right foot (I used crutches going to the bathroom at night). Not fun. Once ground, the issues disappeared.

Boot pain sucks.
Good grief, you have had some serious boot woes!

I'm in the mach 1 lv. Geez, I'm so bummed. I was hoping these would make my last trip of the year really fun and not be plagued with boot issues, but I'm thinking it's going to be a struggle. To top it all off, I REALLY can't play hooky at work this week, everybody is calling out with the flu and I am stuck doing my own job, next weeks work since I will be out, and covering for people below me too. 12 hour days till we leave, so I don't even have time to drive up in the evening to do a few more runs. :(

Still holding out a shred of hope that they will settle in for me within the first day or two in Montana....
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Try them on at home with nylons. I really think the squeezing at the side won't be so bad once you ski them, the toes, on the other hand...I am with the others in wondering why they weren't addressed. More toe room length-wise or up and down is a not a bad thing and doesn't hinder performance. Try the nylons to see if they help with that, too.
 
Good grief, you have had some serious boot woes!

I'm in the mach 1 lv. Geez, I'm so bummed. I was hoping these would make my last trip of the year really fun and not be plagued with boot issues, but I'm thinking it's going to be a struggle. To top it all off, I REALLY can't play hooky at work this week, everybody is calling out with the flu and I am stuck doing my own job, next weeks work since I will be out, and covering for people below me too. 12 hour days till we leave, so I don't even have time to drive up in the evening to do a few more runs. :(

Still holding out a shred of hope that they will settle in for me within the first day or two in Montana....
Don’t forget - it will be no big deal to take care of this once you are in Big Sky. Go to Lone Mt sports. Go after your first ski day. They can take care of it overnight. No need for it to be a time consuming process. Especially since you already have @liquidfeet ‘s excellent diagnosis!
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
My experience with toe box punching is this.
1. Not all bootfitters own the tools to punch the toe box in all three dimensions, up, forward, and out to the side. So not all bootfitters can do what needs to be done. They may not tell you, the customer, that they don't have the specific tool needed to shape that toe box to match your toes.

2. The bootfitter needs to grind the area a little first, then punch. If the initial grinding isn't done, the punch will not last. The plastic has a "memory" and will return to its initial state. I've had a punch disappear overnight after the work of a bootfitter I no longer visit.

Has anyone else had bootfitters tell you these things? I respect my current bootfitter totally, and he tells me these things.
 
My experience with toe box punching is this.
1. Not all bootfitters own the tools to punch the toe box in all three dimensions, up, forward, and out to the side. So not all bootfitters can do what needs to be done. They may not tell you, the customer, that they don't have the specific tool needed to shape that toe box to match your toes.

2. The bootfitter needs to grind the area a little first, then punch. If the initial grinding isn't done, the punch will not last. The plastic has a "memory" and will return to its initial state. I've had a punch disappear overnight after the work of a bootfitter I no longer visit.

Has anyone else had bootfitters tell you these things? I respect my current bootfitter totally, and he tells me these things.
I always need a stretch/punch on the inside of my forefoot to accomodate a prominent bone (no shell matches my foot shape there), otherwise the little bone on the outside of my forefoot screams. I went years with fitters trying to grind away the outside with no relief, turns out making a spot for the opposite side bone to sit is my solution. Last time I had it done was quite recent, and my fitter kept feeling the spot while the adjusted boots were on my feet. I asked why, and he said he wanted to be sure the bump out didn’t shrink back up due to the plastic’s memory as it cooled off. He was pretty satisfied with it but mentioned we may need to revisit it if it didn’t stay completely. I skied them last weekend and I felt around 80% better, no more excruciating pain but still some nuisance pain. We are going to recheck the space when I’m back in the area in a couple of weeks so he can see if we can get things a little better. I’m pretty conservative with wanting to go slow and not overdo the space there and compromise performance. I’d be happy even if we stay where we are now, but would like to see his thoughts once he checks things out again.
 
The bootfitters at LMS are excellent and have all the necessary tools. It is not always necessary to grind before punching but yes, sometimes it has to be punched more than once before the punch will hold.
 

vickie

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
A bootfitter in Portland told me that the plastic has to be heated to x degrees and left for y hours in order for a punch to be retained. I don't know if that means the heat must be applied for the entire time or just pressure applied for that time after the plastic is sufficiently heated.

I was able to avoid needing a grind/punch on those boots.
 
A bootfitter in Portland told me that the plastic has to be heated to x degrees and left for y hours in order for a punch to be retained. I don't know if that means the heat must be applied for the entire time or just pressure applied for that time after the plastic is sufficiently heated.

I was able to avoid needing a grind/punch on those boots.
Yes. Which is why it is typically an overnight operation. Even then, it might revert and need a second punch. But it’s always doable.
 
It was my understanding that a little grind before a punch eliminates the overnight stay at the bootfitter's shop. Anyone concur?
I can ask my fitter if he does that next time I’m there as I’m not sure. I’ve never left my boots overnight for this though, so curious now if he starts with this.
 

SquidWeaselYay

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Sorry I've been MIA. Swamped at work.

Dieter did do a little tiny grind on each toe already before I left the shop. He wanted me to ski them before doing any more. It was a seriously small grind.

I think at this point I am planning to try my best to ski them for the week, and get work done when I come back.

I am hoping it won't be unbearable.
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Sorry I've been MIA. Swamped at work.

Dieter did do a little tiny grind on each toe already before I left the shop. He wanted me to ski them before doing any more. It was a seriously small grind.

I think at this point I am planning to try my best to ski them for the week, and get work done when I come back.

I am hoping it won't be unbearable.
Take some panty hose/trouser socks because even a little room will help. Also, plan to take the boots off at lunch so your feet get a break. Have fun!
 

SquidWeaselYay

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Small update: I took the liners out, put my feet in them, and realized that the liner itself is tight on my toes. Took a hairdryer on high heat, low air and heated up the neoprene toe while standing in them for a few minutes. Just put them back into the boots, and that helped with the toe pain a little.... At least it seems that way standing around my living room. I am still pressing against the front with my big toe while not flexed, and the outside bone on the midfoot still hurts.

I didn't realize it before, but the fitter put small heel lifts in on the zeppa board. I pulled them out and couldn't flex the boot as well, even with the bolt out. I put them back in. I still think these may need softened for me at some point.

@liquidfeet I'm going to Big Sky for a week
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Ack, too short of a liner is a tough one. Did you try super thin socks? Any volume that you can eliminate will help, even just a mm or two.
 

SquidWeaselYay

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Ack, too short of a liner is a tough one. Did you try super thin socks? Any volume that you can eliminate will help, even just a mm or two.
Yeah, I tried trouser socks. It was okay, but still snug.

I think liners can be stretched a bit.

Flying out tomorrow, so I guess I will see how it goes soon enough. I'm nervous about it. I hope I can tolerate it or it breaks in a bit like the fitter said.
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
As long as you don't buckle tight and stay flexed at the ankle, you will be fine for a couple of hours. Plan on a longish lunch and take the boots off. Let DH go buy your food and just give your feet time to recoup from the morning.
 

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