• Women skiers, this is the place for you -- an online community without the male-orientation you'll find in conventional ski magazines and internet ski forums. At TheSkiDiva.com, you can connect with other women to talk about skiing in a way that you can relate to, about things that you find of interest. Be sure to join our community to participate (women only, please!). Registration is fast and simple. Just be sure to add webmaster@theskidiva.com to your address book so your registration activation emails won't be routed as spam. And please give careful consideration to your user name -- it will not be changed once your registration is confirmed.

Why ski resorts are dying

Simygirl

Diva in Training
#21
Welcome! Where else have you skied locally? There are ski areas without all the resort amenities of Camelback in the region that are not as expensive when it comes to lift tickets.
Thank you! I tried Shawnee but Camelback is way better. And I was inspired to buy the triple pass in December so it a great deal. What other resorts do you recommend that are a day trip from NYC?
 

Simygirl

Diva in Training
#22
Yeah I have to say the coverage they have given the lack of natural snow so far has been amazing. We have had mostly great days so far as long as you can get there before everything gets skied off.
True! Conditions were great this past Sunday considering it rained all day Saturday. But after 11am the snow got slushy. Got there early and left early.
 
#24
Thank you! I tried Shawnee but Camelback is way better. And I was inspired to buy the triple pass in December so it a great deal. What other resorts do you recommend that are a day trip from NYC?
I grew up in NYC but didn't do a lot of skiing until long after my mother decided central NC was a better place to be retired. If I were still in NYC, I would be driving up to the Catskills or the Berkshires. Or perhaps to Montage or Elk.

I've stayed at the Shawnee timeshare resort and wandered over to take a look at the base. Looks like a great place for kids to learn. Also took a quick look at the Camelback base, which is clearly more of a 4-season resort with slopeside lodging. In comparison, Belleayre, Hunter, and Windham have more interesting terrain. Also crowded on weekends though. To avoid lift lines, need to drive a little farther to ski at Plattekill.

I've skied a day or two at Montage, Elk, Plattekill, Belleayre, and Hunter in recent years. Plattekill, Belleayre, and Hunter have added terrain and/or lifts since I was in the area.

Here's the Catskills thread for 2019-20:
https://www.theskidiva.com/forums/index.php?threads/catskills-ny-2019-20.24034/
 

Simygirl

Diva in Training
#25
Thank you! I’m new to skiing so this site is amazing! So much support and information! I’ll slowly try all the mountains you mentioned. I’ve been to Hunter as well, but as you mentioned is very crowded in the weekends. I’ll skip work and go during the week sometime.
 

Peaheartsmama

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#29
Most mountains in the area have pretty decent three pack tickets for 100-120 each if you watch out for deals in the fall. They usually stop selling them by dec/ early Jan. Shawnee, Mountain Creek and Camelback all do. Cant remember if Jack Frost does. I’ve tried lots of the resorts within about 2 hrs of NYC and so far CBK has the best progression of terrain for beginners/ early intermediates. You don’t go from bunny hill to top of the mountain - lots of trails to build confidence on for kids especially. But most of all, cheap ($10/hr) onsite daycare made it possible for me to take lessons and juggle two kids of varying abilities in the early years. One thing to note is they have a 199 three pack that gives you 3 lift tickets and three rentals. Pretty decent deal.
 

Fluffy Kitty

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#32
But I have yet to ski a sunny day this season. I guess Mother Nature is trying to keep the crowds away.
:smile:

The old "no sun" trick doesn't keep the crowds away here. Snow's the thing.
Totally. I have a pet peeve, about the fact that the crowd is always larger on powder days. Those are the worst days for beginners to learn or for intermediates to really get the appetite to come more often. I see all these people struggling in tracked-out Cascade Concrete Crud, the kind of snow that even experts struggle to glide through, abandoned all over the hill by their psyched-up buddies who were absolutely sure that one or two back-side first-chair runs would make a believer out of anyone. Nope. Spouses looking at spouses resentfully at each other. Children complaining about the travails of life. Advanced skiers realizing that they've bitten off a bit too much to chew, realizing that they haven't gotten their ski legs back for the season, realizing that they should have gone in for a cup of hot cocoa when the rest of the crew gave up...

I think resorts would do well to hype up the groomer days and cloudy-chilly days, rather than powder days; those are the best days for skiing, IMHO, for skiers of all levels, but especially for beginners. (Conversely, it really annoys me when Bachelor hypes up "fast snow". Way to scare off the beginners!)

And long-haul trips to large resorts are also not the best idea for beginners. Smaller, access-friendly, uncrowded hills can build confidence much faster. Someone should organize "never ever" tours to these humble mountains. (I've mentioned that I can often park a few dozen yards away from the lift, haven't I?)

That said, I second @Christy's observation that the Cascades are doing fine this season. Global warming has definitely cut down on the season (Bachelor was "early season" a whole week after Christmas! Everyone had scratched-out bases! Unheard of!) but I am not as worried about the interest among the old, the young, and the in between. What the Millennials forsake, Gen Z will embrace! :smile:
 
#33
Totally. I have a pet peeve, about the fact that the crowd is always larger on powder days. Those are the worst days for beginners to learn or for intermediates to really get the appetite to come more often.
I think resorts would do well to hype up the groomer days and cloudy-chilly days, rather than powder days; those are the best days for skiing, IMHO, for skiers of all levels, but especially for beginners.
I see the hype about powder and great soft spring conditions from some of our local mid-Atlantic resorts. Some of those conditions are very tough for beginners to learn on. I see struggles and yard sales all over, lots of crying and frustrated folks. There's something to be said about nice packed groomers that are easy to learn on. Thick bumped up snow is tough until you know how to ski it. Heck, even just the other day was a bit tough with piles of soft granular that you sunk into right next to hard, crusty slick snow. It took concentration to stay centered and balanced to avoid sliding out or catching a ski in the piles. There's something to be said about smooth groomers to cruise on and work on drills.
 

Members Online

Latest posts