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what counts as fast?

Cantabrigienne

Certified Ski Diva
#22
It's definitely why I haven't been shy with she ski shops about how & where I ski. So type iii skier is how I get classed. Part of the reason I started having the angst is because I was on another ski forum, mostly guys, and they all talk about going 50mph. And I definitely do not go that fast. Then I read a study conducted at a ski resort where they used speed guns and then asked skiers how they classed how fast they were going... The women mostly classed slow as 8-15 mph. Moderate as 15-25, fast as 25+. The slow women averaged about 10mph, the moderate around 20, the fast just above 30. The men on the other hand, put slow at 15-25mph, moderate at 25-35, and fast as 40+, and averaged speeds that matched (I think a lot of them them hit 50mph too). The point of the study was actually about whether DIN settings should take into account gender when defining ski style. (Personally, instead of second guessing individuals, it seems smarter to me to just use a definition based on actual speeds).
That's fascinating. I have only just started using a tracker app, so can finally match up my actual speed with how fast it felt to me - and those categories sound about right to me. I am definitely a slow skier & my top speed (empty roads, coming in hot to the chairlift) is consistently around 50km/h or about 30mph. The other little aha! is realizing that my sense of speed while cycling is about the same as when skiing
 

lisamamot

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#23
In terms of speed...lower 40s is my max and it feels quite fast to me and my "mom brain". I am most comfortable in the mid to upper 30s. Others go faster and that is fine as long as they are skiing in control. What bothers me is when I see people who seem to equate speed with being a strong skier but they don't have the skill to handle the speed.

@novium , 8.5 is quite a high DIN but perhaps you have a very small BSL. When you use a DIN calculator, what do you get?
http://www.mechanicsofsport.com/skiing/equipment/bindings/din-calculator.html

I'm sure you know that DIN should be set so skis will come off when you need them off: A crash. Weight, height, skier aggressiveness and what terrain is being skied factor into DIN setting. If DIN Is too low a premature release can be catastrophic. I disagree at least for me the 'chart' takes me down a number because of my age..
Agreed!

When using a chart and my true age:
Skier type 2 = 4.5
Skier type 3 = 5.5 DIN
Skier type 3+ = 6.5 DIN

When using a chart being < 50 years old:
Skier type 2 = 5.5 DIN
Skier type 3 = 6.5 DIN

I am not a Skier type 3+ nor am I under 50 years old but I have pre-released more than once with my DIN set at 5.5; most recently at Big Sky when I had to get my skis worked on at Bridger Bowl after realizing my AFD was loose on both skis after flying out with them. They did the whole work-up on the ski but used the chart and set my DIN at 5.5 since I didn't lie about my age. The next day I came over the side of a mogul and landed a little enthusiastically and there went a ski which caused me to fall. It wasn't a big fall but if I had been on a steep it could have been. I whipped out my handy dandy tool and set my DIN to 6 and did not have another issue. I did have one fall after that and a ski popped off which I was fine with. I just don't want the ski coming off to be the cause of the fall!

I either sign off on a different DIN or change it myself afterwards - some shops will not allow you to sign off on a different DIN which is frustrating. At this point I feel unsafe with a DIN below 6. I am now 49 forever until I cannot get away with it anymore and then I will either sign off on a higher DIN, or change it myself.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#24
49 forever! Yes! Me too! I also set my DIN higher than recommended, also around a 6 or 6.5.
 

novium

Certified Ski Diva
#25
In terms of speed...lower 40s is my max and it feels quite fast to me and my "mom brain". I am most comfortable in the mid to upper 30s. Others go faster and that is fine as long as they are skiing in control. What bothers me is when I see people who seem to equate speed with being a strong skier but they don't have the skill to handle the speed.

@novium , 8.5 is quite a high DIN but perhaps you have a very small BSL. When you use a DIN calculator, what do you get?
http://www.mechanicsofsport.com/skiing/equipment/bindings/din-calculator.html


Agreed!

When using a chart and my true age:
Skier type 2 = 4.5
Skier type 3 = 5.5 DIN
Skier type 3+ = 6.5 DIN

When using a chart being < 50 years old:
Skier type 2 = 5.5 DIN
Skier type 3 = 6.5 DIN

I am not a Skier type 3+ nor am I under 50 years old but I have pre-released more than once with my DIN set at 5.5; most recently at Big Sky when I had to get my skis worked on at Bridger Bowl after realizing my AFD was loose on both skis after flying out with them. They did the whole work-up on the ski but used the chart and set my DIN at 5.5 since I didn't lie about my age. The next day I came over the side of a mogul and landed a little enthusiastically and there went a ski which caused me to fall. It wasn't a big fall but if I had been on a steep it could have been. I whipped out my handy dandy tool and set my DIN to 6 and did not have another issue. I did have one fall after that and a ski popped off which I was fine with. I just don't want the ski coming off to be the cause of the fall!

I either sign off on a different DIN or change it myself afterwards - some shops will not allow you to sign off on a different DIN which is frustrating. At this point I feel unsafe with a DIN below 6. I am now 49 forever until I cannot get away with it anymore and then I will either sign off on a higher DIN, or change it myself.

I get DIN 6 on type 1, din 7 on type 2, DIN 8.5 on type 3, DIN 10 type 3+.

How tricky is it to adjust your DIN yourself? Is it just changing the dial to the appropriate number on the front and back?
 

nopoleskier

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#26
I get DIN 6 on type 1, din 7 on type 2, DIN 8.5 on type 3, DIN 10 type 3+.

How tricky is it to adjust your DIN yourself? Is it just changing the dial to the appropriate number on the front and back?

Yes you can adjust DIN yourself. Suggest go to ski shop or to a buddy that mounts bindings & have them show you.

Wow 10+ DIN IMO is for extreme skiers, racers over 185LBs who DON"T want their skis to release- Most of us Do want our skis to Release when needed. It's the pre-mature (in bumps) like @lisamamot mentioned.. been there done that, Not good. But I do want them to release if needed.
 

novium

Certified Ski Diva
#27
Yes you can adjust DIN yourself. Suggest go to ski shop or to a buddy that mounts bindings & have them show you.

Wow 10+ DIN IMO is for extreme skiers, racers over 185LBs who DON"T want their skis to release- Most of us Do want our skis to Release when needed. It's the pre-mature (in bumps) like @lisamamot mentioned.. been there done that, Not good. But I do want them to release if needed.
Me, too. I just listed the whole range to demonstrate where I fall for my weight/boot/height/etc.
 

Pequenita

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#28
I get DIN 6 on type 1, din 7 on type 2, DIN 8.5 on type 3, DIN 10 type 3+.

How tricky is it to adjust your DIN yourself? Is it just changing the dial to the appropriate number on the front and back?
Forward pressure goes into binding release, too, not just DIN. You could set your own DIN, but the visual indicator is not always accurate and it’s better to go by “turns of the screwdriver” than the visual indicator if you’re going to DIY.
 

Serafina

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#29
I go with skier type iii+ because anything else gives me a din that will cause my skis to pre-release. I didn't have to do that until I turned 50. This "turn 50 and lose a DIN" thing is pure bull$$it.

As far as fast goes, it's 100% a function of
1. your skill
2. your skis
3. snow conditions
4. light conditions
5. how many people are sharing the run with you

A few weeks ago, I got lucky and hit the trifecta: bluebird skies, fresh cord on solidly packed powder/frozen gran, and first tracks with no one behind me. I made it down the run at 50mph (clocked, not an app) and felt like I was flying, but didn't feel "fast" to me, because it was perfect conditions on an extremely familiar run. I might have been comfortable with more speed, but this was all I could get out of the terrain.

A few days later I was skiing in flat light, limited visibility, on variable conditions, with other people on the run, and anything over 25mph felt "fast", and I backed it down.
 

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