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Lunchtime in the COVID era?

QCskier

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#1
How do you Divas intend to navigate lunch time this winter with all the COVID craziness? Will you just ski shorter days and eat when you get home or will you have something on the fly? I am not comfortable eating inside the chalet with the risk of COVID so I am trying to figure out how to make this part of the ski day work. Eating outside will be an option on warmer days but in Quebec where I ski those are few and far between until March arrives.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#2
I tend to not ski full days anyway since I can ski most days, so will pack something in my pocket, or my home mountain is setting up big heated tents with a lot of grab n go items, so I might do that occasionally, too. I'm with you--sitting in the lodge with masks off is NOT on my list of good ideas.
 
#3
I always usually ski from opening until like 2pm or so. I then do apres’, which will mostly be at my own accommodations this year depending on what the outdoor offerings will be. So I don’t anticipate any logistical changes for me. If I were driving from the mountain I’d probably just do the same schedule and pack some snacks for my drive home etc. I’m not one to really like to take breaks in the middle of the day normally. I do when I’m on vacation with friends because usually then I’m skiing longer days so I need more energy replenishment midday and also like to socialize of course.
 
#4
I tend to not ski full days anyway since I can ski most days, so will pack something in my pocket, or my home mountain is setting up big heated tents with a lot of grab n go items, so I might do that occasionally, too. I'm with you--sitting in the lodge with masks off is NOT on my list of good ideas.
I've found that PB&J sandwiches make a great pocket lunch for skiing...will probably do a lot of that this season.
 

Boston girl

Certified Ski Diva
#5
I always make my own and bring it because I am an athlete and eat every 2 to 3 hours anyway. Covid-19 makes no difference.
In winter its easy to keep things cold. Nutrition is important for staying well and muscle recovery. I keep my metabolism high and love to eat outside or the jeep. I love PB and Jelly too.
 

VTsnowflower

Certified Ski Diva
#8
Hurrah for big pockets! PB&J on a homemade sourdough roll - can take a lot of squishing in the pocket and still be good. Keeps the furnace fueled with carbs, sugar, fats and protein. I also like Lara bars in the pocket. They're soft enough to eat even when cold/frozen, with no crumbs or nuts falling around. In the morning, I always make a (Zojirushi) travel mug of milky sweet tea (I use one black tea bag and one ginger tea bag with whole milk and honey or maple syrup.) I leave this in the car, and it's still warm when I get back hours later. It is a great restorative at the end of the day.
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
#14
Wraps are good too. I'm planning on eating back at the condo. So soup and sandwich mostly. Years ago when we as a family took our own lunch, Mom made a soup of beef consomme and tomato soup mixed. Gave the tomato soup a kick.
 
#15
Ugh as someone who hates peanut butter.. I dread the thought of everyone packing this and pulling it out to eat all over the mountain. Hate the smell so much! :laughter:
Also not a fan of PB&j, though sometimes I can do an almond butter and honey. Generally I do a very basic cheese sandwich--just good bread and good cheese. I don't want anything messy for obvious reasons. String cheese in the pocket is good too. I keep more food in the car for the ride home.

I've always meant to try to do this thing I saw on the Tour de France, that the riders were eating. It was essentially a frittata with a lot of rice. I think theirs had prosciutto, rice, mushrooms, parmesan and eggs. It cut up nicely into squares and they ate it while riding. I'd skip the meat but the rest sounds good to me, especially if I added some other veggies. As you can eat frittatas at room temp I think it would be fine in a pocket.

ETA: here's the American version I guess.
https://www.velopress.com/sick-of-sweet-try-savory-bacon-and-egg-rice-cakes/
 
#16
Also not a fan of PB&j, though sometimes I can do an almond butter and honey. Generally I do a very basic cheese sandwich--just good bread and good cheese. I don't want anything messy for obvious reasons. String cheese in the pocket is good too. I keep more food in the car for the ride home.

I've always meant to try to do this thing I saw on the Tour de France, that the riders were eating. It was essentially a frittata with a lot of rice. I think theirs had prosciutto, rice, mushrooms, parmesan and eggs. It cut up nicely into squares and they ate it while riding. I'd skip the meat but the rest sounds good to me, especially if I added some other veggies. As you can eat frittatas at room temp I think it would be fine in a pocket.

ETA: here's the American version I guess.
https://www.velopress.com/sick-of-sweet-try-savory-bacon-and-egg-rice-cakes/
This makes me weirdly happy, it’s not often I find others who share my distaste for peanut butter. Lol Most people find it weird since so many seem to like it. As a kid I was always the problem guest who was like no no can I please have just jelly or just fluff if PB&J or PB&F were on the lunch menu at a friend’s house etc..

I like the cheese sandwich idea since I love cheese and bread.. Have definitely skied with, squares of cheese and pepperoni, the little round babybel cheese, string cheese, etc. they’re great easy snacks. I like bringing clementines on hikes/skins as well, they are a great size to pack if you have a backpack anyway.
 
#17
ME, TOO! I wish I didn't, because a PB&J sandwich is easy to make, easy to carry, and good for you, too.
I agree, I do wish I liked it because it always seems so easy and like people really enjoy it.

I’m not a big fan of any nut butter. Well, I actually don’t mind certain ones as a dip to veggies, pretzels, bread sticks etc., but something about the texture in sandwich form is unappealing to me.
 
#18
What do you eat for a ski day?
I usually try to eat a hearty breakfast and that keeps me full and energized until I eat a late lunch/Apres’ snack around 2pm when I’m done skiing. I have a couple of go tos that I planned out with my nutritionist last year for this purpose. 1) 2 Eggs, 3 links of breakfast sausage, and 2 slices of raisin bread or sourdough toast or 2) Steel cut oatmeal with assorted fruit, nuts, and chia seeds mixed in. This works well for me because I have a seasonal rental on mountain so I can cook while I do my morning stretching and then eat and head out the door on my skis in time for lifts opening. When I was a day tripper or rented off mountain I’d just grab a pre-made breakfast sandwich or something quick like that because my timing didn’t work as well. I’m really not a morning person but love skiing fresh tracks, so something has to give.

If I’m skiing out west or skinning here I usually carry protein bars, meat and cheese, small fruit, etc. as easy snacks.
 

Abbi

Angel Diva
#20
I usually try to eat a hearty breakfast and that keeps me full and energized until I eat a late lunch/Apres’ snack around 2pm when I’m done skiing. I have a couple of go tos that I planned out with my nutritionist last year for this purpose. 1) 2 Eggs, 3 links of breakfast sausage, and 2 slices of raisin bread or sourdough toast or 2) Steel cut oatmeal with assorted fruit, nuts, and chia seeds mixed in. This works well for me because I have a seasonal rental on mountain so I can cook while I do my morning stretching and then eat and head out the door on my skis in time for lifts opening. When I was a day tripper or rented off mountain I’d just grab a pre-made breakfast sandwich or something quick like that because my timing didn’t work as well. I’m really not a morning person but love skiing fresh tracks, so something has to give.

If I’m skiing out west or skinning here I usually carry protein bars, meat and cheese, small fruit, etc. as easy snacks.
if I eat that much food for breakfast before skiing I‘d need a nap! I don’t exercise well with much in my stomach. Usually I would have coffee and a protein bar. Or sometimes a small amount of oatmeal Or yogurt. Or toast with your dreaded peanut butter on it! Some fuel with protein but not enough food to load me down.
 

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