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Inspiration for skiers over 50, or 60, or 70+

marzNC

Angel Diva
#1
As 2017 approaches, I'm looking forward to my first season over 60. Not quite old enough for senior discounts on lift tickets yet because those usually require being 62+ or older. However, there is still plenty of inspiration to be found in stories about older Divas learning to ski, working to improve, or continuing to ski at a high level as seniors. My goal is to join the Wild Old Bunch at Alta as often as possible when the time is right. They are over 70, or 75, or 80, or even 85+.

Here's some inspiration to get the ball rolling. Any stories about senior women who aren't about to slow down on the slopes? Could be other women you've skied with or your own experience.


For intermediates who haven't seen it, check out this discussion in Ski Tips that began several years ago:

Tips for intermediates over 40 planning to ski until 70+
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
#2
I can hardly believe it, but I'll be 62 next month. So yeah, I am O-L-D.

Around here, most senior ski discounts don't kick in til 70, so I'm not looking at saving any money just yet. So in that regard, there's nothing to be gained from my advanced age.

I often ski with a group of people who are my age and older, and most ski every (week)day -- granted, not from first chair to last, but from 9 til 1. For me, that's enough. During the week you can get a ton of runs in, and I've noticed that my stamina isn't what it used to be. I definitely get tired more easily.

I think my attitude toward skiing has changed over the past few years. I don't feel like I have to push myself to ski the toughest, steepest, gnarliest terrain anymore. I mean, I like a challenge, but I don't feel like it's something I have to do -- or even aspire to doing. And while I'd love to become better and better, I'm not so sure that's in the cards any longer. I may just have to accept that my skiing is what it is, and that's that.

I think I'm also a little more aware of staying injury-free. Sure, an injury can be a problem at any age. But I think it could be more of one for someone older. And that may feed into my unwillingness to do anything too crazy.

Generally, I just want to have a nice time out there. And really, I don't think there's anything wrong with that.
 
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Abbi

Angel Diva
#3
I can hardly believe it, but I'll be 62 next month. So yeah, I am O-L-D.

Around here, most senior ski discounts don't kick in til 70, so I'm not looking at saving any money just yet. So in that regard, there's nothing to be gained from my advanced age.

I often ski with a group of people who are my age and older, and most ski every (week)day -- granted, not from first chair to last, but from 9 til 1. For me, that's enough. During the week you can get a ton of runs in, and I've noticed that my stamina isn't what it used to be. I definitely get tired more easily.

I think my attitude toward skiing has changed over the past few years. I don't feel like I have to push myself to ski the toughest, steepest, gnarliest terrain anymore. I mean, I like a challenge, but I don't feel like it's something I have to do -- or even aspire to doing. And while I'd love to become better and better, I'm not so sure that's in the cards any longer. I may just have to accept that my skiing is what it is, and that's that.

I think I'm also a little more aware of staying injury-free. I mean, sure, an injury can be a problem at any age. But I think it could be more of one for someone older. And that may feed into my unwillingness to do anything too crazy.

Generally, I just want to have a nice time out there. And really, I don't think there's anything wrong with that.
You are NOT O-L-D!!!

There are lots of older (than us, even) skiers out on the weekdays and I can't keep up with most of them! I am more aware of my own mortality and avoid ego driven decisions. I'm with you: I don't have to ski all day, and with a pass, don't have that 'make the cost worth the expense' feeling one might get with a day ticket. I quit when I'm tired or something is aching (stupid neuroma) or the crowd gets annoying. And it's all good! Any day on the snow beats most of the ones I used to spend in the office!
 
#4
I met a man considerably older than me (I'm 63, and a beginner) last week and this week again at Berkshire East. Today he helped me to my feet after a fall, and modeled a nice set of linked wedge turns for me to follow. That helped me get going again.

I think those of us getting on in years carry a certain calm about us. This man was very pleasant and easygoing, clearly with nothing to prove. He liked the idea of encouraging another not-so-young person to ski.

I certainly don't have any ego-driven needs to ski above my level. I would like to learn to ski through trees, but that's a long way off, if coming at all.
 

dloveski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#5
I'm inspired by all of the older skiers around resorts here in Utah. My locker neighbor, Harriet Wallis, is a darn good skier and two total hips and two total knees have given her new mojo. She skis most days and writes for local ski pubs and has a blog at senior skiing.com. She gives me sage advice about my cranky knee. I just adore her.

Author: Harriet Wallis
Harriet Wallis has been a ski writer, editor and photographer forever. She learned to ski on a dare when she was in her mid 30s and has been blabbing about it ever since. Her work appears in regional and national print and online publications. Ski Utah named her Journalist of the Year. She's a senior-age skier based in Salt Lake City and she enjoys nearly a gazillion ski days each winter. She also enjoys two stainless steel knees. Harriet loves to be outdoors, so during other seasons she swims, bicycles and kayaks. She also single handedly rips up her yard, converting it to an arid and low water landscape with indigenous plants that she propagates. Skiing is a lot easier!



4 Comments
 
#6
I'm another approaching my 60. What?? how did this happen??? was just saying to a friend who turned 60 the 23rd. we're the old people now.. I don't feel as old as I imagined 60 would be when i was younger.. yes I get tired but skiing is so much fun I'm thankful I'm still at it I can still do much of what I did younger but not jumping off cliffs or dropping in.. I'm glad I don't have to do a run to prove anything to anyone. I just want to have fun and be safe.

My biggest fear is getting hit or hurt.. I know it takes much longer to recover at my age. I do know of a couple of 90+ still skiing on super nice days and I hope I'm one of them too..
 
#7
I’ll concur with @ski diva and @nopoleskier on wanting to avoid hits or injuries - and no longer having anything to prove, to myself or anyone else. This is now purely for enjoyment.

But age is such a mind-set. Stop and smell the roses, enjoy your life. It can all turn on a dime. Which is why I no longer make long-range plans. I can’t. I learned last year how fast that can all change. Today is what counts.

I’ve got some years on all of you, for the record. But skiing weekdays at Sugarloaf, I’m one of the “junior” seniors.

I use my discounts freely and proudly. Earned ‘em. :becky:
 

Mariem

Diva in Training
#8
I'll be 60 next May. We are fortunate in that we live in New England and ski Loon and Sunday River regularly, but now can afford to go out west once a year.

New equipment in the past few years has given me a new lease on my ski life. Two years ago I did the Women's Clinic at Loon, and I'd do it again this year, but I have conflicts. (One of the sessions is the week after I run the Disney Princess half marathon. ; ) Inspiration is everywhere!

My four kids would be sad if I stopped skiing. No matter how crazy our lives our, we always find at least one day in a season to ski together. And now I get to ski with my grandkids!
 
#9
I'm mid 60's (yikes is right) and am more cautious than in my 20's etc. due mostly to bone density issues and just in general! Going to Austria and Switzerland in mid February with a good friend and an awesome skier who is 74..... My BF is late 60's and another good skier! I hope to continue skiing for years to come if all my body parts are all working!
 

mojo

Diva in Training
#10
I'm inspired by all of the older skiers around resorts here in Utah. My locker neighbor, Harriet Wallis, is a darn good skier and two total hips and two total knees have given her new mojo. She skis most days and writes for local ski pubs and has a blog at senior skiing.com. She gives me sage advice about my cranky knee. I just adore her.

Author: Harriet Wallis
Harriet Wallis has been a ski writer, editor and photographer forever. She learned to ski on a dare when she was in her mid 30s and has been blabbing about it ever since. Her work appears in regional and national print and online publications. Ski Utah named her Journalist of the Year. She's a senior-age skier based in Salt Lake City and she enjoys nearly a gazillion ski days each winter. She also enjoys two stainless steel knees. Harriet loves to be outdoors, so during other seasons she swims, bicycles and kayaks. She also single handedly rips up her yard, converting it to an arid and low water landscape with indigenous plants that she propagates. Skiing is a lot easier!



4 Comments
 

mojo

Diva in Training
#11
I'm inspired by all of the older skiers around resorts here in Utah. My locker neighbor, Harriet Wallis, is a darn good skier and two total hips and two total knees have given her new mojo. She skis most days and writes for local ski pubs and has a blog at senior skiing.com. She gives me sage advice about my cranky knee. I just adore her.

Author: Harriet Wallis
Harriet Wallis has been a ski writer, editor and photographer forever. She learned to ski on a dare when she was in her mid 30s and has been blabbing about it ever since. Her work appears in regional and national print and online publications. Ski Utah named her Journalist of the Year. She's a senior-age skier based in Salt Lake City and she enjoys nearly a gazillion ski days each winter. She also enjoys two stainless steel knees. Harriet loves to be outdoors, so during other seasons she swims, bicycles and kayaks. She also single handedly rips up her yard, converting it to an arid and low water landscape with indigenous plants that she propagates. Skiing is a lot easier!



4 Comments
 

mojo

Diva in Training
#12
I also went to Dr. Beck for my knee replacement. Had it done in May 2014 and back skiing November 2014 with a 112 day season. Dr. Beck encouraged me to get back to my passion. I worked with Danny at Canyon Sports Therapy, he understood my goals and got me back on the slopes enjoying skiing more than I have in years.
 
#13
I also went to Dr. Beck for my knee replacement. Had it done in May 2014 and back skiing November 2014 with a 112 day season. Dr. Beck encouraged me to get back to my passion. I worked with Danny at Canyon Sports Therapy, he understood my goals and got me back on the slopes enjoying skiing more than I have in years.
My PT and the PTA who also works with me are both skiers, and are both excited that I'm taking up skiing (age 63). They're really helpful with exercises and stretches (even though I'm there for my shoulder at this point in time - it's always something!). Such support!

I feel cautious and a little fragile, learning a sport like this, but I've never thought of myself as an athlete, and I've always been timid. So it's nothing new. I'm actually less timid as I get older (but still pretty cautious physically!).
 

dloveski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#15
I also went to Dr. Beck for my knee replacement. Had it done in May 2014 and back skiing November 2014 with a 112 day season. Dr. Beck encouraged me to get back to my passion. I worked with Danny at Canyon Sports Therapy, he understood my goals and got me back on the slopes enjoying skiing more than I have in years.
Dr Beck is the one who did Harriet's knees! She interviewed a handful of docs first. One was an overweight doc and she was skeptical but his staff said, he's not a skier but he does have a house in Park City! Harriet ditched that one.
 

Mariem

Diva in Training
#16
I feel cautious and a little fragile, learning a sport like this, but I've never thought of myself as an athlete, and I've always been timid. So it's nothing new. I'm actually less timid as I get older (but still pretty cautious physically!).
I took up running at the age of almost-58. I'm not fast, but I did run my fourth half marathon with a time of 2;39, which is respectable. I also started a bootcamp regimen at my gym at that point. I've never been much of an athlete, but I need to stay healthy, and these things help with that, plus keep me happy!
 
#17
I took up running at the age of almost-58. I'm not fast, but I did run my fourth half marathon with a time of 2;39, which is respectable. I also started a bootcamp regimen at my gym at that point. I've never been much of an athlete, but I need to stay healthy, and these things help with that, plus keep me happy!
Hi Mariem,

Another late-blooming athlete!

I took up ice hockey at 48. I never got very good at it, and when my somewhat younger teammates started "retiring" because they reached their mid-forties and were afraid of injuries, they were replaced by 20-somethings who had played in college! And not just on our team, but all through the league. It got kind of scary quickly.

When I caught the bug for skiing I knew I had to do it. I'm unlikely to exercise at all if I'm not doing something that I'm passionate about, and as you know, we have to exercise or old age is going to be miserable. I love hiking in the summer, and I love to ice skate, but there are so few opportunities to skate outside in the winters we have now. So skiing it is. I'll progress cautiously and slowly, but it's certainly a workout!
 
#18
@MaineSkiLady "But age is such a mind-set. Stop and smell the roses, enjoy your life. It can all turn on a dime. Which is why I no longer make long-range plans. I can’t. I learned last year how fast that can all change. Today is what counts."

My motto is "life is not a dress rehearsal" We should all be lucky to die all used up with no regrets :-)
 

tesdavis

Diva in Training
#19
My BFF and I are early 50's and still rocking the slopes in all kinds of weather. However, we too want to avoid the chance of injury. We ski fast and aggressive, yet have no problem saying "I'm done" when its time to go in for a break or for the day. We also avoid ski areas and runs where other skier or boarders are out of control or where its just too crowded. And I personally have to issue telling another skier or boarder when they are causing a hazard for others. Just today a young man almost ran me over and I told him so in the lift line. "I'm so sorry Mamn" he said. Correct response.
 

mojo

Diva in Training
#20
Agree with avoiding runs crowded with skiers going too fast for ability/lack of skills for turning and stopping, especially after being hit from behind 2 years ago. My trust in other skiers was destroyed when that happened! Tougher to rebound from that sort of thing in my 60s.
 

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