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You don't have to drink to ski.

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
#1
That's the title of an article on Powder.com.

What do you think? Do you think there's too much of an emphasis on drinking/weed in skiing? Or do you think this isn't an issue at all?

I'm not much of a drinker, at least while I'm skiing. It just doesn't work well for me. What about you.
 

SallyCat

Moderator
Staff member
#3
I think the pressure to "partake" depends pretty heavily on your age group, but I am prepared to be wrong in that I have not lived in a ski town. I can imagine the age-of-peer-pressure might extend upward a bit more in those environments. And/or that people who don't want to drink may find that it's easier to just relocate to a non-ski-town.

I love a good-quality craft beer after skiing and mountain biking. I don't hang out with people who drink to excess or put pressure on others to drink (as far as I know or can tell).

I have several siblings who have been in AA for years and are happy and doing great in the program, as well as some close friends who gave up drinking as part of their athletic training plans, so it would actually be uncommon for me to be in a group of people who are all drinking. It just never seems like an issue; but then we are in our forties and fifties.
 

racetiger

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#4
I can say probably every day I skied I smelled weed in the air when Id pass by some trees. Why can't people just plain Ski? Drink water!
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#5
I know folks who "stop at the tree" to smoke weed and also folks who carry a flask. I don't have the skill set to ski under the influence so I don't. Après has always been a huge part of the ski scene and I would not expect that to change any time soon. It's part of the vacationing, partying scene. I used to enjoy participating more when I was young.
 

2ski2moro

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#6
I don't drink while skiing, as a rule, but I have been known to have a swig of Fireball from a friend's flask on the Gondi. If I am driving home, I won't drink apres because I believe in the 0.0% philosophy. I don't understand the people who feel the need to drink* while boating, either.

I am truly afraid of the drunks* on the hill. Some "liquid courage" combined with the entitlement attitude (she cut into my line) is a formula for disaster.

*Alcohol or cannabis.
 

SqueakySnow

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#7
I feel like, in any discussion of recreational impairment, it's important to use common sense. Don't do anything under the influence if you could possibly injure/kill someone or yourself. Skiing has inherent risks, so it's not something you should do if your judgment is impaired. That said, there's nothing wrong with a beer or glass of wine with lunch, but use your judgment. If you want to get hammered or couch locked in your condo after you leave the hill, that's your choice.
 

MissySki

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#8
I have no problem with others using alcohol or marijuana when skiing, as long as it isn’t to the extent that they are putting others at risk. I mean there are so many people on strong pharmaceutical drugs driving around everyday, and you are none the wiser.. Just because you can smell alcohol or weed on someone, doesn’t mean they are super intoxicated, and just because you can’t smell anything doesn’t mean they aren’t either. Especially nowadays with more states legalizing recreational marijuana and edibles etc. being readily available. That’s probably the more scary scenario, new people taking stuff they aren’t used to versus people who have always done it and have a much higher tolerance already.

There is a radio show I listen to that was discussing some article awhile back about how many people go to work high everyday, and the amount of people who called in to say they did so was astounding.
 

Ski Sine Fine

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#10
I am very boring. I don’t drink or smoke. I hate crowds and loud music. After skiing, I ice my knee, soak in the tub, take a nap, watch TV or read, maybe sightsee. Rinse & repeat. Apres has never been a thing for me. Yes, I am very boring. It’s always been mystifying to me why people need alcohol or drugs to have a good time.
 

2ski2moro

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#11
There is a radio show I listen to that was discussing some article awhile back about how many people go to work high everyday, and the amount of people who called in to say they did so was astounding.
I don't mean to hijack this thread, but I have a quick question. In a state where cannabis is legal for adult recreational use, what happens if your employer tests for drugs and or alcohol?
 
#12
Here's the policy for the California State University, where I work, on the subject:

The Chancellor’s Office Drug-Free Workplace Policy
In accordance with Executive Order 930 the CSU is committed to maintaining a workplace environment free from the unlawful manufacture, possession, distribution, dispensation or use of any controlled substances. Employees violating this policy are subject to discipline up to and including dismissal. In addition to, or in lieu of discipline, CSU may require employees violating the policy to participate in a drug-use rehabilitation program.

Proposition 64 Does Not Alter Policy
The passage of Proposition 64 by California voters does not alter the Drug-Free Workplace Policy. Marijuana remains a controlled substance under federal law. Nothing in Proposition 64 changes the obligations of CSU to maintain a drug-free community, prevent illegal drug use, and discipline employees who unlawfully manufacture, possess, distribute, dispense or use illegal drugs on university property or activities.
 

Tvan

Angel Diva
#13
I can barely ski sober... no way I’d ski under the influence of either alcohol or drugs. I’d prefer to not ski with anyone who is impaired, in the same way that I’d prefer that everyone on the highway was sober, well rested, and had their cell phones stashed in the backseat. I know that’s not likely, but in a high risk sport, the more that people are functioning on all cylinders seems like it makes for much safer and more fun ski days.
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#14
That’s probably the more scary scenario, new people taking stuff they aren’t used to versus people who have always done it and have a much higher tolerance already.
That is the reason that I NEVER go out on either New Year's Eve or St. Patrick's Day. I cocktail waitressed and bartended while in college. We called them the "amateur drunks." They didn't know enough to stay off the road and would have fought to the death over their car keys. They are out in huge abundance on the party holidays.

I don't mean to hijack this thread, but I have a quick question. In a state where cannabis is legal for adult recreational use, what happens if your employer tests for drugs and or alcohol?
To the best of my knowledge no employer tests for alcohol because it's pointless. It's out of your system in a matter of hours, including your blood. Possibly professional drivers are randomly tested? As for drugs, any employer who receives federal funds could certainly deny employment based on THC in the blood - the US military for example. It's still illegal federally speaking. Also, anyone who signs a no marijuana clause for employment would be bound by that. Other than that, I think there is great potential for a lawsuit. The employer would have to prove the employee was under the influence at work and that is pretty impossible because it remains in the blood stream for a few days. I am sure there will be some test cases in the future. IMHO - it's not worth the hassle. I was a teacher and we weren't drug tested, but I valued my career more than being a test case - we were bound by a moral turpitude clause. Try defining that!
 

DeweySki

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#15
I remember reading this article when it came out in Powder and thinking, "Wow, this is not at all what I experience in ski culture." It was also around the time the author appeared on the Safety Third podcast. Both the episode and podcast are highly recommended.

After the article and podcast, I guess I realized I am either:
a) outside of this demographic by way of age (I am mid-thirties)
b) outside of this demographic by way of seriousness about skiing (I and everyone I ski with limit or abstain from alcohol/drugs before big ski days), or
c) not experiencing this due to geographic location (totally normal in Northern California to be surrounded by people who don't drink at all, whether it's heath, athletic performance, addiction, religion, etc.)
 
#16
I remember reading this article when it came out in Powder and thinking, "Wow, this is not at all what I experience in ski culture." It was also around the time the author appeared on the Safety Third podcast. Both the episode and podcast are highly recommended.

After the article and podcast, I guess I realized I am either:
a) outside of this demographic by way of age (I am mid-thirties)
b) outside of this demographic by way of seriousness about skiing (I and everyone I ski with limit or abstain from alcohol/drugs before big ski days), or
c) not experiencing this due to geographic location (totally normal in Northern California to be surrounded by people who don't drink at all, whether it's heath, athletic performance, addiction, religion, etc.)
Well said! That was exactly my reaction to the article. The implication is that the author's experience is universal. I've skied in multiple regions in recent years at destination resorts and small ski areas. Mostly midweek but also some weekends. I think the author's worldview of "ski culture" is too narrow and a bit biased by his personal history with alcohol and drugs before discovering the joy of skiing in Utah and outdoor activities in general.

I've had little trouble finding friends for skiing and ski trips in more than one region who have good fun without drinking more than a beer or glass of wine with dinner. Midweek, many locals are gone by lunch time. That can even happen at Alta on a powder day.
 

MissySki

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#17
I don't mean to hijack this thread, but I have a quick question. In a state where cannabis is legal for adult recreational use, what happens if your employer tests for drugs and or alcohol?
I’m not sure honestly, there isn’t a universal policy at this time, that’s for sure! My company didn’t come out with anything specific after things were legalized in MA, but I know some companies have come out with similar policies to yours. Though there was something that came out at my job before recreational sales had even started in MA about company spending when traveling for work to states where it’s legal. As in you may not expense this item as if it were a drink with dinner etc., I was quite taken aback that this even needed to be said, but well I guess there is always that person who tries to push the limits.. Seems like companies I’ve seen with specific policies against it for their employees tend to have federal ties for funding, at least in some cases. At my company they do a drug test as a condition of employment when starting, I’m not sure whether this would be a problem on hire now or not. I agree that it seems a bit of an overreach to tell your employees they can’t do something that’s legal (at the state level anyway) as long as it isn’t on company time. Will be helpful when they have a test that can prove intoxication at a certain time..

Overall I’m amazed that the federal government hasn’t taken any sort of action. I believe that if they are going to turn a blind eye for the most part then they need to unschedule the drug allowing for more research to occur as well as current companies being able to do business in an appropriate manner with banking etc. There is enough traction now that it seems it will only continue to spread and I just don’t understand what is gained by keeping it illegal federally. Either that or shut it all down, one way or the other. Now that there are also two states that have legalized mushrooms, which really blows my mind, I’m very curious where things will be in the next ten years overall.
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
#18
With cannabis legal in Canada, it still is controlled. Impaired is impaired whether alcohol, cannabis or any other drug. I don't know of any employers that test regularly for substances in Canada. Sport Canada does for sure. It's straightened out a friends son. He's been named to the national slopestyle team, so any friends that use, are gone from his life!!

As for alcohol and my skiing....that's what apres is for. I know you can get beer and wine in the lodge at the top of the mountain, but....I prefer to have all my senses working when I'm skiing.
 

Jenny

Angel Diva
#19
WalMart has fired at least two people for using medical marijuana - one here in Michigan before we passed the recreational use but after we passed the medical use law and one in Arizona that was more recent. WalMart won the Michigan case, although it looks to me like it was for want of a comma in the wording of a part that specifically prohibited business and other entities from taking disciplinary action for legal use, but they lost the Arizona case. And both of those were in regards to medical marijuana, not recreational.
 
#20
I remember reading this article when it came out in Powder and thinking, "Wow, this is not at all what I experience in ski culture." It was also around the time the author appeared on the Safety Third podcast. Both the episode and podcast are highly recommended.

After the article and podcast, I guess I realized I am either:
a) outside of this demographic by way of age (I am mid-thirties)
b) outside of this demographic by way of seriousness about skiing (I and everyone I ski with limit or abstain from alcohol/drugs before big ski days), or
c) not experiencing this due to geographic location (totally normal in Northern California to be surrounded by people who don't drink at all, whether it's heath, athletic performance, addiction, religion, etc.)
Ditto. There's no activity that I do where it would be strange if someone didn't drink. Even book club lol, which is sorta just an excuse to get together with neighborhood women and drink wine. But one of the group doesn't drink and it's so not an issue that I have no idea why. It doesn't matter.
 

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