• Women skiers, this is the place for you -- an online community without the male-orientation you'll find in conventional ski magazines and internet ski forums. At TheSkiDiva.com, you can connect with other women to talk about skiing in a way that you can relate to, about things that you find of interest. Be sure to join our community to participate (women only, please!). Registration is fast and simple. Just be sure to add webmaster@theskidiva.com to your address book so your registration activation emails won't be routed as spam. And please give careful consideration to your user name -- it will not be changed once your registration is confirmed.

Question: Ski binding brake width?

elephantseal2

Diva in Training
Hi, just wondering what the minimum and maximum binding brake width should be in comparison to the skis waist? For example, would a ski with an 80 waist work with either one of an 85mm binding or 90mm binding? Is one better than the other?

Thanks so much!
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I'm not sure. I've always had trouble finding brakes in different widths. It sounds like you've found a treasure trove of options. You could ask over at the SkiTalk forum and I bet you'd get a bunch of answers there.
 

elemmac

Angel Diva
Thank you, I was worried they'd be too close to waist of the ski. So in saying that, would that mean closer is better? Could I go even closer, like with an 83mm brake width if I wanted to?
Rule of thumb…
Ideal brake width is 0-5mm (wider than your ski). Industry standard generally says 0-10mm. Many people will tell you 5mm +/-. But going smaller than your ski will often require bending the brake out a bit, cutting off the “nubs” of rubber to smoothly put the skis together, base-to-base. Some people won’t have any issues going a bit smaller, but it’s completely dependent on the specific ski and binding.

Personally I try to stay around 0-5, but I have skis that are 10mm wider (110mm brake on a 100mm ski) and have no issues.
 

fgor

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Thank you, I was worried they'd be too close to waist of the ski. So in saying that, would that mean closer is better? Could I go even closer, like with an 83mm brake width if I wanted to?
Absolutely. I've had two pairs of skis that are 88mm wide with 90mm bindings. No issues at all with the binding brake width.
 

elephantseal2

Diva in Training
T
Rule of thumb…
Ideal brake width is 0-5mm (wider than your ski). Industry standard generally says 0-10mm. Many people will tell you 5mm +/-. But going smaller than your ski will often require bending the brake out a bit, cutting off the “nubs” of rubber to smoothly put the skis together, base-to-base. Some people won’t have any issues going a bit smaller, but it’s completely dependent on the specific ski and binding.

Personally I try to stay around 0-5, but I have skis that are 10mm wider (110mm brake on a 100mm ski) and have no issues
Thank you, I guess i'll probably go with the 83mm bindings.

Do bindings of the same model from different years go off the indemnification list at the same time? (e.g. salomon L10 2017 bindings vs a model of salomon L10 bindings released in 2021)

Just asking because I noticed indemnification lists will list the name of a binding model (without being specific of the year), even though that model has a new release every year? Is there even a difference in between the bindings released each year?
 

elemmac

Angel Diva
Do bindings of the same model from different years go off the indemnification list at the same time? (e.g. salomon L10 2017 bindings vs a model of salomon L10 bindings released in 2021)

Just asking because I noticed indemnification lists will list the name of a binding model (without being specific of the year), even though that model has a new release every year? Is there even a difference in between the bindings released each year?
Yes and no.

The models will come off of the list at the same time if they were not changed. However, most manufacturers will occasionally change the design (minor changes) without changing the model name. Sometimes you need to dig a bit to figure out what the different models have been, and if they've changed.

Let's take your L10 for example. If you look up the current indemnification list for Salomon for 2021 (note that this is the 20-21 list, not 21-22), you will find the E L10 GW (current), N L10 (current), E L10 Easytrack (non-current), and J L10 (final season) all on the list.

Then looking up the indemnified list for 2017 the N L10 falls onto the current list. This would lead me to believe that the L10 has not changed between those years. Most models will stay on the list for approx. 10 years. You can go back to older years to approximate how much longer you'll have with that binding 'making the list'.

If you're purchasing the 2021 binding, you may want to consider the L10 GW version depending on your boot soles. The other version (2017 or 2021) will not accept a GripWalk sole.
 

Staff online

Members Online



Top