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New boots or new liners??

KKL2018

Diva in Training
#1
I got my boots seven seasons ago. I average about four to five hundred miles per season. Question is how much life is left in the boot?

The power strip Velcro is weak, the boots have been stored and kept appropriately so they seem to be in good condition with no cracks, aren't brittle. Padding however is a different story. Even if I ratchet down there still some movement in the heel and I can feel that the padding is packed down.

Question is do I get new boots or do I get new liners?
Issue I have is that boot fit is complicated with my feet.i have a high arch, high instep and wide (ee) small foot, typically wear a boy's four-and-a-half tennis shoe...which translated to a 6.5 in a woman's ski boot (23-23.5 mondo). I currently have the 13 Atomic Hawx 100 (80 flex). Took a lot of alterations, pain, and a custom footbed to finally have a boot that I can go all day in comfortably. Not looking forward to starting that process over again LOL.

My biggest concern of course is safety after I saw a guy's boot blow tab it's going down the hill Full Tilt. How do you know when the end of the life is close with a boot. If replacing the liner is appropriate at the stage where on Earth do you get those?
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
#2
I sympathize. It's never easy to get new boots, so I understand your wanting to hang onto your old ones as long as possible. Seven years, though, is a long time for boots.

I've never heard boot wear described in terms of mileage, so I can't address your wear based on that. Ussually, however, boots last between 150-200 full skiing days, liners somewhat less. The liners can be easily replaced or remolded (if they're moldable), if that's the problem. The velcro boot strap can be replaced, too.

A bigger problem is if the boots are cracked or brittle, in which case they will shatter. I've seen it happen, and the entire boot essentially deconstructs. Also, the toe and heel may become rounded because of wear, which means your boots won't fit into your bindings securely. And that can be a real safety issue.

Another issue: people's feet do change over time, so that's something you might want to consider, as well. The boots you have, though right for you seven years ago, might not be right anymore.

Have you brought them in anywhere to have them evaluated?
 

KKL2018

Diva in Training
#3
I sympathize. It's never easy to get new boots, so I understand your wanting to hang onto your old ones as long as possible. Seven years, though, is a long time for boots.

I've never heard boot wear described in terms of mileage, so I can't address your wear based on that. Ussually, however, boots last between 150-200 full skiing days, liners somewhat less. The liners can be easily replaced or remolded (if they're moldable), if that's the problem. The velcro boot strap can be replaced, too.

A bigger problem is if the boots are cracked or brittle, in which case they will shatter. I've seen it happen, and the entire boot essentially deconstructs. Also, the toe and heel may become rounded because of wear, which means your boots won't fit into your bindings securely. And that can be a real safety issue.

Another issue: people's feet do change over time, so that's something you might want to consider, as well. The boots you have, though right for you seven years ago, might not be right anymore.

Have you brought them in anywhere to have them evaluated?
All great points. That's my next step, taking them in....
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#4
Seven years is a long time for boots. The plastic degrades over time, with or without use. As awful as starting over is, that is probably your best bet. Believe me, I feel you on this. I am really hard to fit also.

Do you have a good boot fitter? If not, let us know where you are located and someone might be able to make a recommendation.
 

snoWYmonkey

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#6
I order my heat moldable wrap liners from intuition liners. They have saved my on-snow career. Warm, and adaptable with extra foam butterfly padding and other parts literally cut away.

Guilty of over 600 days in the same shells! Metal buckles almost worn through, plastic crack across front, white plastic now yellow. I fully empathize with dreading the new boot process (mine should be at the post office today).

I would have a boot fitter that does not focus on selling boots evaluate their viability. You may, or may not, be able to just get new liners.
 

badger

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#7
Agree with @snoWYmonkey , New liners --the stock ones---are not available most of the time. Intuitions are a potential fix. Caveat: Boot molds do change from time to time for the same model boot. You won't know it, it's not something consumers would be aware of. I found that out the hard way; I tried to replace liners in my not so old Dalbello boots, and the new ones couldn't even get into the boot at all. ( Dalbello used Intuition for their stock liner in many of their boots. )

Have the boot evaluated.
 

dloveski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#9
I have such weird, deformed feet that my comments can't be considered. But just don't scrimp on boots.

My story is extreme, I have been assured I am an outlier on three levels.

I have to get the shell that best can adapt to my narrow heel, low angle ankle AND have a toe that can be ground out to accommodate my huge bunion and HUGE mortons/long toes. Last boot fitting took 2 guys four hours to modify the shell, do the footbeds, etc. Getting into the boots on a cold day, especially first days of season, is the hardest part of the day---millimeter by millimeter moving into the tight shell.

But once in, after initial shock, they fit like a glove and my skiing has improved as I can actually control my ski with my feet (years of sloppy boots led to sloppy skiing).

So---Chris an Inkline and my SIL---masters of the craft. What can I say but no one else (not even Earl) could do it!!!!
 

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