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Will skiing be safer because of COVID?

#21
PS I had no idea drunk skiers was such a big thing!
Guess you haven't gone night skiing near a university. :wink:

In the midwest, there are places where traditionally night skiing on weekends can go on until midnight or 1am. I imagine a good percentage of the skiers/boarders have stopped for a beer or two during breaks to warm up.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#23
Along the lines of drunk skiers - I'm curious if the uptick in reckless driving incidents in the US during COVID will have a similar effect on things like skiing. I'm not sure if we know if it's driven more by people who are like "woohoo, fewer people on the road, I'm driving 100mph!" or if it's driven more by pent up frustration or what. If it's the latter - are people going to be better behaved or worse on the slopes?

I know yesterday, there was a post in a women's mountain biking group on Facebook asking people to consider wearing body armor and biking a little more cautiously now that our local hospitals are facing overflowing ICUs and Utah was just yesterday getting approval on the plan to ration care and decide priorities on who gets the ICU room in various situations, which is a horrifying thing for medical professionals to have to deal with, I'm sure. In the women's group, the poster was lauded for her thoughtfulness and people thought it was a good idea and were thankful for the reminder. She cross-posted in the non-women's-specific group and was basically told to shut up, mind her own business, and just stay home if she's such a snowflake and moderators deleted her post.

I know that's just anecdotal and not even the same sport, but I feel like that does not bode well for expecting thoughtful/safe recreation this winter.

And also reminds me how lucky we are to have this forum. :hug:
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
#24
I know yesterday, there was a post in a women's mountain biking group on Facebook asking people to consider wearing body armor and biking a little more cautiously now that our local hospitals are facing overflowing ICUs and Utah was just yesterday getting approval on the plan to ration care and decide priorities on who gets the ICU room in various situations, which is a horrifying thing for medical professionals to have to deal with, I'm sure. In the women's group, the poster was lauded for her thoughtfulness and people thought it was a good idea and were thankful for the reminder. She cross-posted in the non-women's-specific group and was basically told to shut up, mind her own business, and just stay home if she's such a snowflake and moderators deleted her post.
Holy crap. I feel like inconsiderate, uncivil behavior is becoming more and more common and more and more accepted. It's awful.

And also reminds me how lucky we are to have this forum. :hug:
Yes, I agree. We're not always perfect, but there's a lot worse out there.
 
#25
I know yesterday, there was a post in a women's mountain biking group on Facebook asking people to consider wearing body armor and biking a little more cautiously now that our local hospitals are facing overflowing ICUs and Utah was just yesterday getting approval on the plan to ration care and decide priorities on who gets the ICU room in various situations, which is a horrifying thing for medical professionals to have to deal with, I'm sure. In the women's group, the poster was lauded for her thoughtfulness and people thought it was a good idea and were thankful for the reminder. She cross-posted in the non-women's-specific group and was basically told to shut up, mind her own business, and just stay home if she's such a snowflake and moderators deleted her post.
It’s amazing how being asked to be considerate of the world outside a beloved sport can be so “triggering” to these people who are presumably adults and have other people in their lives.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#28
Along the lines of drunk skiers - I'm curious if the uptick in reckless driving incidents in the US during COVID will have a similar effect on things like skiing. I'm not sure if we know if it's driven more by people who are like "woohoo, fewer people on the road, I'm driving 100mph!" or if it's driven more by pent up frustration or what. If it's the latter - are people going to be better behaved or worse on the slopes?

I know yesterday, there was a post in a women's mountain biking group on Facebook asking people to consider wearing body armor and biking a little more cautiously now that our local hospitals are facing overflowing ICUs and Utah was just yesterday getting approval on the plan to ration care and decide priorities on who gets the ICU room in various situations, which is a horrifying thing for medical professionals to have to deal with, I'm sure. In the women's group, the poster was lauded for her thoughtfulness and people thought it was a good idea and were thankful for the reminder. She cross-posted in the non-women's-specific group and was basically told to shut up, mind her own business, and just stay home if she's such a snowflake and moderators deleted her post.

I know that's just anecdotal and not even the same sport, but I feel like that does not bode well for expecting thoughtful/safe recreation this winter.

And also reminds me how lucky we are to have this forum. :hug:
I saw that post and responded. I'm surrounded by SO much covid denialism here in Morgan County, it was very nice to see I'm not alone in my worries.
 
#29
Which mtb group (FOMO< thought I was in all them lol)

I am so on the fence about resort skiing this year, AND nordic, at least anything that involves the lodge. Hub may take a medical leave from Patrol this year so that solves that problem for the most part.
 

Olesya Chornoguz

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#30
As @NewEnglandSkier said those of us who work from home don't have infinite flexibility to ski. I am also expected to work be online during normal office hours so I can't exactly get up and go ski. And I work long hours some times too so it's not conducive to skiing at all.

Almost all people I know that WFH is a similar situation. They have to work during regular 9-5 hours. Besides from what I have seen most ski resorts are instituting capacity limits. They have to enforce them, having a reported case contracted at the resort would generate bad publicity for the resort. I don't think they would want that. As for season pass sales going up I think it has more to do with people trying to make sure they have priority access to slopes.

As for NE, yes sure there are some high density population areas but there are also stringent travel restrictions and fo NH and VT they are quite strict. I don't really have much interest in skiing in NE other then NY and maybe ME because of the travel restrictions.
 
#31
As @NewEnglandSkier said those of us who work from home don't have infinite flexibility to ski. I am also expected to work be online during normal office hours so I can't exactly get up and go ski. And I work long hours some times too so it's not conducive to skiing at all.

Almost all people I know that WFH is a similar situation. They have to work during regular 9-5 hours.
Almost everyone I know is doing their job during the same hours as when they went into the office, so I've been confused as to why there are so many people out hiking on weekdays. I do have flexibility, and the weekday crowds have been shocking. I thought it would ease up once kids went back to school but it's still super busy. My best guess is:
*The unemployed
*People who are now living in their vacation homes and managing to get out on weekdays
*Local people whose other vacations were canceled so they are using vacation days on outdoor activities
*Tourists replacing their other canceled trips with outdoorsy vacations
*FWIW I know 3 people that retired early due to everything going on. Not sure if that is a trend
* ??

I have been thinking about these groups, and how many of them I'm going to have to compete with for weekday skiing. You wouldn't think the unemployed would want to spend their money on skiing, but most passes aren't all that expensive anymore, and I wonder how many people used their stimulus check to buy one. Or maybe they'd already bought one, or maybe their parents got them one.
 

WhyKnot

Certified Ski Diva
#32
Guess you haven't gone night skiing near a university. :wink:

In the midwest, there are places where traditionally night skiing on weekends can go on until midnight or 1am. I imagine a good percentage of the skiers/boarders have stopped for a beer or two during breaks to warm up.
Ha!! Well, now I know to stay away from Bolton Valley on their $ 25.00 all day and into the night ski days!

I live in an area it gets really cold so night skiing is not appealing to me, at least most of the winter. It's funny, I am such a safety first person that drinking and skiing does not compute, kind of like drinking and driving. I am now wondering -- Is... drinking allowed on the slopes ? I mean I am asking seriously, are there rules about drunk skiing -- like will Patrol/the resort ban skiers? Or if people are drinking from flasks on the slopes, etcetera?
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#33
Which mtb group (FOMO< thought I was in all them lol)

I am so on the fence about resort skiing this year, AND nordic, at least anything that involves the lodge. Hub may take a medical leave from Patrol this year so that solves that problem for the most part.
It's a local Utah based group.

Almost everyone I know is doing their job during the same hours as when they went into the office, so I've been confused as to why there are so many people out hiking on weekdays. I do have flexibility, and the weekday crowds have been shocking. I thought it would ease up once kids went back to school but it's still super busy. My best guess is:
*The unemployed
*People who are now living in their vacation homes and managing to get out on weekdays
*Local people whose other vacations were canceled so they are using vacation days on outdoor activities
*Tourists replacing their other canceled trips with outdoorsy vacations
*FWIW I know 3 people that retired early due to everything going on. Not sure if that is a trend
* ??

I have been thinking about these groups, and how many of them I'm going to have to compete with for weekday skiing. You wouldn't think the unemployed would want to spend their money on skiing, but most passes aren't all that expensive anymore, and I wonder how many people used their stimulus check to buy one. Or maybe they'd already bought one, or maybe their parents got them one.
This is what I've witnessed here, too. A lot of people who already had second homes here who either retired, or have flexible schedules. It's been nuts, and depressing as the trails have been busy, and also chewed up terribly because of the number of bikers and lack of precipitation. So, I anticipate weekdays to be busier than ever. They were already busier than ever for the past two seasons, so I'm truly not sure what to expect.
 
#35
As @NewEnglandSkier said those of us who work from home don't have infinite flexibility to ski. I am also expected to work be online during normal office hours so I can't exactly get up and go ski. And I work long hours some times too so it's not conducive to skiing at all.

Almost all people I know that WFH is a similar situation. They have to work during regular 9-5 hours. Besides from what I have seen most ski resorts are instituting capacity limits. They have to enforce them, having a reported case contracted at the resort would generate bad publicity for the resort. I don't think they would want that. As for season pass sales going up I think it has more to do with people trying to make sure they have priority access to slopes.

As for NE, yes sure there are some high density population areas but there are also stringent travel restrictions and fo NH and VT they are quite strict. I don't really have much interest in skiing in NE other then NY and maybe ME because of the travel restrictions.
While NH might have strict guidelines for those outside of New England, those of us up here are not restricted from there at all. So I actually think they have the least rules in New England in terms of travel restrictions and then even what is allowed to be open and at what capacities. I think MA people make up a big majority of the out of state NH skiers and many can just do it as a daytrip even if there were restrictions added for lodging. Given the fact that I've heard that popular hiking trails have been very crowded there even on weekdays, I expect skiing to be the same. Some people must just have more flexibility or aren't working, or work nights, or who knows haha. I'm hoping being in ME that I'll have more luck on the weekdays I get to ski since we are not as close to a population center, but we'll see..
 
#36
*FWIW I know 3 people that retired early due to everything going on. Not sure if that is a trend
Local government here offered some pretty sweet retirement incentives and many took advantage. Keep in mind that many municipalities offer full retirement at 55 so if offered a lump sum or medical insurance paid for a few years could be worth it to some.
 

Olesya Chornoguz

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#37
While NH might have strict guidelines for those outside of New England, those of us up here are not restricted from there at all. So I actually think they have the least rules in New England in terms of travel restrictions and then even what is allowed to be open and at what capacities. I think MA people make up a big majority of the out of state NH skiers and many can just do it as a daytrip even if there were restrictions added for lodging. Given the fact that I've heard that popular hiking trails have been very crowded there even on weekdays, I expect skiing to be the same. Some people must just have more flexibility or aren't working, or work nights, or who knows haha. I'm hoping being in ME that I'll have more luck on the weekdays I get to ski since we are not as close to a population center, but we'll see..
I know NH allows New Engand people in. But I still can't go, I'm not in New England. :smile: It's true that MA is populous though and Boston and surroundings have large populations and I can see how NH ski areas have a lot of MA clientele.
 
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liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#38
I know NH allows New Engand people in. But I still can't go, I'm not in New England. :smile: It's true that MA is populous though and Boston and surroundings have large populations and I can see how NH ski areas have a lot of MA clientele.
If NH continues to be easier for MA, RI, and CT skiers to get to than ME or VT, then NH ski areas will certainly benefit. What that means for crowding remains to be seen.
 
#40
If NH continues to be easier for MA, RI, and CT skiers to get to than ME or VT, then NH ski areas will certainly benefit. What that means for crowding remains to be seen.
Do you think that in the last few seasons that most people in New England were season passholders or bought day tickets?

My understanding is that day tickets will be severely limited, especially on traditionally busy days such as Saturdays. No walk up tickets in most cases, only advanced purchase, few if any discounted tickets. Many places have a cap, or will, on the number of 1-location season tickets. Even without RFID, I would certainly hope that ski industry managers have a pretty good idea how many people were skiing on a given day in the last few years. Normally the goal is to sell as many day tickets as possible. This will not be a normal season.

The best example I've come across of using past guest numbers to come up with a plan for limiting capacity by changing the approach to day tickets and season passes is Mt. Hood Meadows.

Sept. 21, Mount Hood Meadows blog
Managing visitation by spreading out demand to responsibly accommodate the most skiers and snowboarders possible
https://www.skihood.com/about-us/me...-demand-to-responsibly-accommodate-the-most-s

For the resorts that opened up by July 2020, there was clearly demand. However, the places that charge admission weren't nearly as crowded as usual on weekends. That was because ticket sales were severely limited because of capacity limits. If season passes existed, it was actually better than usual since there was little need to avoid a Saturday. That's what I experienced first hand at the Biltmore Estate and Gardens in Asheville, NC. Seems to be the case for Disney World and Big SNOW as well.

I think the issue may be more for backcountry skiing in all regions. Meaning having more people going who are not experienced and who may get themselves into trouble.
 

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