• Women skiers, this is the place for you -- an online community without the male-orientation you'll find in conventional ski magazines and internet ski forums. At TheSkiDiva.com, you can connect with other women to talk about skiing in a way that you can relate to, about things that you find of interest. Be sure to join our community to participate (women only, please!). Registration is fast and simple. Just be sure to add webmaster@theskidiva.com to your address book so your registration activation emails won't be routed as spam. And please give careful consideration to your user name -- it will not be changed once your registration is confirmed.

What to ask for / how to benefit from a private lesson

Pixie Perfect

Certified Ski Diva
#21
Fantastic advice from everyone. Very helpful. I forgot to add I also have a new torn meniscus to contend with. I assume I should mention that as well to the ski school and definitely the instructor.
I’m hard of hearing (have been since I was a child) and I always tell the point person organizing students into lessons and the instructors. That way they know if they try to yell instructions across the hill to me I’m most likely not going to understand. I’ve had great success with instructors accommodating my disability. In fact after one lesson last season another student told me they hadn’t experienced up close instruction because they were so used to instructors saying follow me and yelling directions from a distance. They appreciated it just as much as I did.

Last season I had group lessons almost everyday I skied. I’m lucky that I had a great experience with all but one. The one lesson I did not liked I filled out a comment card. Actually I make a point to always fill out comment cards about my instructors. The ones I loved I wrote specifically what I enjoyed about the lessons. The one I disliked I explained why I was disappointed with my experience. I think it’s important for the ski instructors to know what they can do better, but also for the ski school to know which instructors students are unhappy with.
 
#22
. . . In retrospect, I just had really bad luck with group lessons. I probably should’ve been more assertive and asked for more explanations of the why and more feedback in what I do wrong and what I do right.
By any chance did any of the instructors you've been with in the last couple years talk about the movement of your ankles? Knees? Placement of hands?

Remembered a summer thread about ankle flex. Fair to say that the comments from instructors varied.
https://www.theskidiva.com/forums/i...ex-a-key-factor-for-good-control.22645/page-2
 
#23
Thanks for the link. I’ll check it out. I remember some talk about using the foot or knee to initiate movement for a turn. I don’t remember much about the ankle. As for hand positions, I know I have a habit of dropping my right hand behind me when I turn, which pulls my body out of position. Still working on it!
 
#24
@Ski Sine Fine: same as you, i don't have much luck in group lessons, the instructors I got from group lessons were v. mediocre and underwhelming when I first started learning to ski. I've never done a private lesson because I found it hard to justify the cost. That's just me.

For my case, I think it is really a combination of reasons (besides instructors are "so-so"). I learned skiing at an older age, so there is lot of mental baggage (i.e. fear), often times I would not do things instructors told me to do coz of fear. This hinders learning and progression.

English is not my 1st language. When instructors using technical terms to explain movements, I found them to be abstract and unable to fully comprehend the concepts.

I am a visual learner, it is hard to "see" subtle body movements when they are in ski cloths, even though they told me they are "exaggerating" the moves to illustrate the points!

When I was a beginner, I had instructors told me at least 6 things I need to work on within the first hour of the lesson, I had info. overload and in the end, I got nothing out of it. I felt overwhelmed, all I remembered was how to avoid falling and not crossing my skis.... and forgot everything else I was supposed to do.

With all that said, some of the concepts / movements slowly sink in and I started to "get" it as I ski more (mileage) and took more lessons.

I've done different group lessons in many ski resorts, with the hope of finding the "one" instructor that can help me to understand everything about skiing in one lesson. But that's not realistic. What I learned instead, it would be a "successful" lesson if I could take away one thing from that lesson, and that "thing" would stick in my mind every time I encounter situation "x". For e.g., one successful lesson I'd consider was at Sugarbush, this instructor used ski poles to illustrate why I need to lean forward in steep slopes. (before that, all instructors told me I need to lean forward but I never understood why). After, I always consciously lean forward in steeper terrains because I understand his explanation and it "sticks".

With all that said, my point is, this kind of thing takes time. It takes time to sink in some of the concepts and it takes time for your body to remember certain movements.... mileage is important.
Some people are lucky that they are able to find a good instructor to work with early on. For me, it took a while but that's ok. As the saying goes, better late than never. I like my current Liberty instructor, so I am going to stick w/ her as long as she is teaching there. I have no plan to take lessons in other places, besides Taos....
 
#25
@Ski Sine Fine : reading your comments about lessons at Inside Ski, it seems like you think they have been helpful. I'm looking forward to skiing with you at Taos!

I did a 1-hr private lesson at Inside Ski back in Dec 2017, soon after they opened. It was definitely a workout. I managed a few parallel turns during the last 10-min session. I could understand why the instructor said that kids pick it up quicker, especially the racers who are used to carving.

Having skied with @alison wong over a few seasons, it's been very obvious that lessons from very experienced instructors can really speed up the learning curve for someone who doesn't live in ski country. Doesn't matter if it's on a rolling carpet, at a small hill, or at a destination resort like TSV or Alta.
 
#27
@Ski Sine Fine : reading your comments about lessons at Inside Ski, it seems like you think they have been helpful. I'm looking forward to skiing with you at Taos!
Yes, I find them very helpful. I am working on being aware of what my feet are doing and what the skis are doing, being subtle in movements, and being patient with turns. I’ve had four different instructors at Inside Ski, and while I learned from all of them, Evie is the best in explaining what I’m doing and what to change. Before I get on snow this season, she will discuss how what I do translates to what happens on snow. Not sure we’d cross paths at Taos, as you arrive about the same time I leave, but maybe we’d do so at Massanutten first.
 
#28
Not sure we’d cross paths at Taos, as you arrive about the same time I leave, but maybe we’d do so at Massanutten first.
Oops, forgot your Taos schedule. At least we'll get to talk about skiing when we get together in Nov.

I do hope you get to Massanutten when I'm there in January. I should here about the dates for the Demo Weekend soon.

Yes, I find them very helpful. I am working on being aware of what my feet are doing and what the skis are doing, being subtle in movements, and being patient with turns.
Experiencing the value of patience on turns is very helpful!
 
#31
Another question! I am interested to take Inside Ski group or private lessons as well. Do we use our own equipment (boots, skis, poles)?
 

snoWYmonkey

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#32
Excuse my ignorance, may I know what is "Taos"?
Taos ski valley is a ski area in New Mexico...it is also the name of the county where the resort is located.
 

snoWYmonkey

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#34
Another question! I am interested to take Inside Ski group or private lessons as well. Do we use our own equipment (boots, skis, poles)?
This all depends on the ski resort you are taking your lessons at. Most rent all the gear. Some offer rental discounts for students.
 
#36
. Do we use our own equipment (boots, skis, poles)?
Use your own ski boots (but can be rented if you don't have)
Skis will be provided
Poles - unless you are PhD level (or Post Doc) level of skiing on ski deck, you do not need poles. I 've taken 20+ lesson there and have not had a need to use poles.
You do need to wear helmet. either bike or ski helmet will do.

The shop offers 10 min. free session (last time I checked, but don't quote me for it) to newbies to try out.
 
#37
Use your own ski boots (but can be rented if you don't have)
Skis will be provided
Poles - unless you are PhD level (or Post Doc) level of skiing on ski deck, you do not need poles. I 've taken 20+ lesson there and have not had a need to use poles.
You do need to wear helmet. either bike or ski helmet will do.

The shop offers 10 min. free session (last time I checked, but don't quote me for it) to newbies to try out.
That's so helpful! Now I know only need to bring out boots & helmets.
I will call the store to find out about the 10 min free session. I'll feel bad to drag my entire family there but only I am on the slope.
 
#38
Another question! I am interested to take Inside Ski group or private lessons as well. Do we use our own equipment (boots, skis, poles)?
Most people don't use poles at all at Inside Ski. You use your own boots if you own them. You use short rental skis. The carpet isn't all that good for ski bases. Plus it helps not to have as much length.
 
#39
I will call the store to find out about the 10 min free session. I'll feel bad to drag my entire family there but only I am on the slope.
Having just observed the group lesson that Alison and SSF had today, what they did was switch every 10 min. Apparently when the third woman is present, then the rotation means 2 people on the carpet, followed by 1. They take turns getting the individual attention. Even for a 1-hr private lesson for just one person, the time is broken up in 10-min sessions on the carpet. I've done one private lesson just for the experience soon after Inside Ski opened. It's quite a workout!

If other members of your family are interested, talk to Inside Ski and see what they suggest.
 

Members Online