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Help Needed: What Kinds of Women's Programs Would You Like To See?

badger

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I am not writing to add any suggestions. They have all been excellent.

I just wanted to share my experience:
Several years ago I had signed up for a Women's weekly day clinic. This clinic was held mid-week. The advertisement said that any newcomers were welcome on any day and of any level. The price was good for a daylong event. I showed up to clinic and met the ladies . Well,. Long story short, they decided to head off to ski powder somewhere on the mountain and took off without me, and another non-local registrant.
This Clinic was basically a group of friends/locals and obviously did not want newcomers. No matter how welcoming the brochure made it sound.

I had a nice day skiing with the other outsider, and got tips from an instructor who saw what happened.
 

SallyCat

Moderator
Staff member
Why no advanced lessons btw?
I believe that was an issue of instructor allocation and uncertainty about who would participate. We're a small mountain with more intermediate than advanced terrain, and committing instructors for three different levels of groups was a challenge in terms of profit-cost ratio. So for now, in order to keep the price attractive, we just kept the clinics at two levels. I definitely think there's room for growth if there's interest from more advanced skiers, though.
 
I believe that was an issue of instructor allocation and uncertainty about who would participate. We're a small mountain with more intermediate than advanced terrain, and committing instructors for three different levels of groups was a challenge in terms of profit-cost ratio. So for now, in order to keep the price attractive, we just kept the clinics at two levels. I definitely think there's room for growth if there's interest from more advanced skiers, though.
Makes sense . I'm not familiar with any resorts in the East TBH.
 
Makes sense . I'm not familiar with any resorts in the East TBH.
Even for the northeast, Suicide Six is one of the smaller ski areas. It's been around since 1934, starting with a rope tow. A lot of history and innovation to the place, including embracing snowboarding and telemark skiing early on. Not too much of a surprise that they are looking to explore innovative ways to encourage women who would like to improve their skiing/boarding. Really does not take much terrain to work on technique at any level.
 

SallyCat

Moderator
Staff member
Even for the northeast, Suicide Six is one of the smaller ski areas. It's been around since 1934, starting with a rope tow. A lot of history and innovation to the place, including embracing snowboarding and telemark skiing early on. Not too much of a surprise that they are looking to explore innovative ways to encourage women who would like to improve their skiing/boarding. Really does not take much terrain to work on technique at any level.
Yes, just 650 feet of vertical drop; it's charming and well-loved and has been undergoing significant upgrades lately (new main chairlift, more powerful snowmaking, etc.). The ski area is actually owned by the Woodstock Inn and Resort and is just outside a beautiful small town (Woodstock, VT). So it really has to capitalize on its unique offerings. I'm very much enjoying being part of the process.
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
Sounds great and having been through a few clinics, I just wanted to add one suggestion. For the apres, have a table or 2 reserved for your group. That way they can sit together. Some may not want to, but it's a great way to end the event.
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
Yes, just 650 feet of vertical drop; it's charming and well-loved and has been undergoing significant upgrades lately (new main chairlift, more powerful snowmaking, etc.). The ski area is actually owned by the Woodstock Inn and Resort and is just outside a beautiful small town (Woodstock, VT). So it really has to capitalize on its unique offerings. I'm very much enjoying being part of the process.
Suicide Six may be small, but it’s charming and loaded with ski history. I love it.
 
Yes, just 650 feet of vertical drop; it's charming and well-loved and has been undergoing significant upgrades lately (new main chairlift, more powerful snowmaking, etc.). The ski area is actually owned by the Woodstock Inn and Resort and is just outside a beautiful small town (Woodstock, VT). So it really has to capitalize on its unique offerings. I'm very much enjoying being part of the process.
650 whole feet?! Sigh. I wish we had 650' closer to us than a 5.5 hour drive!
 

SallyCat

Moderator
Staff member
Sounds great and having been through a few clinics, I just wanted to add one suggestion. For the apres, have a table or 2 reserved for your group. That way they can sit together. Some may not want to, but it's a great way to end the event.
That is perfect! Thank you for the suggestion; we're going to plan on it.
 

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