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What is your bootfitting prep?

MissySki

Angel Diva
I’m going to be heading to the bootfitter in a couple of weeks. I’m certainly not new to this, but always a bit anxious because I’ve had a lot of bad experiences with boots in the past. Just search for one of my boot sagas here if you’d like an example of everything that can go wrong going wrong lol.

I’ll be getting a new pair of downhill boots which will be the main focus to my trip. I expect this to be a lengthy process as I definitely want to deal with the alignment issues I have and ignored with my last pair. Secondary will also be an assessment of my hybrid AT boots for an aftermarket liner. I should say that my current bootfitter has always fixed my boot issues that I got from other fitters but has never fit me into a pair to start. I’m super excited to work with him on this as he’s been the only fitter who has ever made my feet happy in problematic boots. He’s an awesome bootfitter and also a pedorthist which is what led me to him years ago.

I’m curious, what do you usually do before a fitting? Do you have models in mind you want to try, completely leave it to your fitter, something else? I’m an over thinker and also very excited to be getting new boots for the first time in around 6 years. So of course I’ve been obsessively reading whatever I can about some current boot models and how materials and technology have changed. Really though this is probably useless and maybe even detrimental as I think I’d rather not have any self created biases ahead of time.

What do you do or recommend doing ahead of a bootfitting?
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
....
I’m curious, what do you usually do before a fitting? Do you have models in mind you want to try, completely leave it to your fitter, something else? I’m an over thinker and also very excited to be getting new boots for the first time in around 6 years. So of course I’ve been obsessively reading whatever I can about some current boot models and how materials and technology have changed. ....
First, I make an appointment ahead of time with my trusted bootfitter. I've found my guy, finally. He works in a ski shop with a race room, so he works on racers as well as recreational skiers. This means he knows how to adjust boots to fit extremely well.

The best time of year is when the stock is at its highest, in late fall/early winter, just after all the new stock has arrived. When I call to make the appointment I ask about the stock. My feet are hard to fit so I want as many boots as possible available to my bootfitter to choose from. He told me to always do this when I need new boots.

The best day of the week is one that won't be clogged with customers. I don't want my bootfitter rushed. The racer kids who get fitted very early in the season, before the recreational skiers start thinking about boots, will know to show up at this time of year when the stock is highest. But they tend to come in at night after their parents are done with work, or on weekends. So a weekday morning is best.

Second, I take my thinnest boot socks with me to wear when I get fitted. One pair, my thinnest pair.

I wear shorts, or if it's cold out, long pants with shorts under them, so I can peel off the long pants when I get in the shop. This is because the bootfitter will need to be able to see my bare knees when checking boot sole canting needs.

That's it. The bootfitter will do all the measurements and movement analysis needed in the shop to choose which boots will fit my feet best.

Oh, if this were a bootfitter who did not know my skiing, a video on my phone of me skiing would be helpful.
 
Last edited:

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
If it's a new fitter, I might take my old boots with me. You have a history already, so no need for that. Otherwise similar to @liquidfeet. Shorts, thin socks.

Right now with Covid we have to make appointments for just about anything. Even to adjust your eye glasses.
 

Iwannaski

Angel Diva
#1:
So of course I’ve been obsessively reading whatever I can about some current boot models and how materials and technology have changed. Really though this is probably useless and maybe even detrimental as I think I’d rather not have any self created biases ahead of time.
I resemble this remark deeply. @MissySki …I have also been watching the Patriot Footbeds Bootorials for extra fake knowledge.
:wink:

#2: @Jilly … I hadn’t thought about taking my old boots (DUH), and I’m so glad you said that, because I do know exactly where those are going wrong. Common sense is not always common practice!
 

RachelV

Administrator
Staff member
...

The best time of year is when the stock is at its highest, in late fall/early winter, just after all the new stock has arrived. When I call to make the appointment I ask about the stock. My feet are hard to fit so I want as many boots as possible available to my bootfitter to choose from. He told me to always do this when I need new boots.

...

+1

Last time I got new boots the stock was quite low, and it was really just luck that they had a few choices in stock that worked for me.
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
First, I make an appointment ahead of time with my trusted bootfitter. I've found my guy, finally. He works in a ski shop with a race room, so he works on racers as well as recreational skiers. This means he knows how to adjust boots to fit extremely well.

The best time of year is when the stock is at its highest, in late fall/early winter, just after all the new stock has arrived. When I call to make the appointment I ask about the stock. My feet are hard to fit so I want as many boots as possible available to my bootfitter to choose from. He told me to always do this when I need new boots.

The best day of the week is one that won't be clogged with customers. I don't want my bootfitter rushed. The racer kids who get fitted very early in the season, before the recreational skiers start thinking about boots, will know to show up at this time of year when the stock is highest. But they tend to come in at night after their parents are done with work, or on weekends. So a weekday morning is best.

Second, I take my thinnest boot socks with me to wear when I get fitted. One pair, my thinnest pair.

I wear shorts, or if it's cold out, long pants with shorts under them, so I can peel off the long pants when I get in the shop. This is because the bootfitter will need to be able to see my bare knees when checking boot sole canting needs.

That's it. The bootfitter will do all the measurements and movement analysis needed in the shop to choose which boots will fit my feet best.

Oh, if this were a bootfitter who did not know my skiing, a video on my phone of me skiing would be helpful.

Thanks, this is pretty much exactly what I've done. Found out when stock would be in and set an appointment for a weekday morning start bright and early. My bootfitter also does a ton of racer bootfitting which is comforting. He was previously a racer himself and was well known by one of my past bootfitters at Sunday River who was also in that world but went elsewhere for work now. It's funny how small the ski world really is in New England.

I definitely plan to wear shorts and my thinnest ski socks (threadbare Smartwools lol).

I do NOT have any recent videos of my skiing so that does kind of stink. I didn't think of that, otherwise I would have tried to get some last season.. Will keep that in mind for the future.
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
If it's a new fitter, I might take my old boots with me. You have a history already, so no need for that. Otherwise similar to @liquidfeet. Shorts, thin socks.

Right now with Covid we have to make appointments for just about anything. Even to adjust your eye glasses.

He actually asked me to bring my old boots for comparison and the skis I use most to look at my alignment when on skis and match that up with my thoughts on what is lacking in my alignment and balance with these boots. Also allows for taking binding ramp angle into account and adjusting bindings if necessary if there is a bsl change.
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
#1:

I resemble this remark deeply. @MissySki …I have also been watching the Patriot Footbeds Bootorials for extra fake knowledge.
:wink:

#2: @Jilly … I hadn’t thought about taking my old boots (DUH), and I’m so glad you said that, because I do know exactly where those are going wrong. Common sense is not always common practice!

Ohhhhhhhh well those videos are a rabbit hole I'll be falling down now, thanks! lol
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
+1

Last time I got new boots the stock was quite low, and it was really just luck that they had a few choices in stock that worked for me.

Absolutely! I definitely need t go with a lot of stock, my feet are a total pain..
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
Don't forget we have a thread in the Gearpedia section!! Review that and go "armed and dangerous!!"
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
Honestly, my only concern is my darn uber low instep.. I know that everything else is possible to get right. Length is easy, width is doable the way this bootfitter does it for me, alignment is a pain but doable.. the one thing I've NEVER had is good instep contact. I'll get kind of a feathery light contact, and that's as good as it's ever been. I really want to get stronger contact there, I just don't know if it's possible with my foot dimensions since it never has been yet regardless of sizing down as much as possible.
 

elemmac

Angel Diva
Honestly, my only concern is my darn uber low instep.. I know that everything else is possible to get right. Length is easy, width is doable the way this bootfitter does it for me, alignment is a pain but doable.. the one thing I've NEVER had is good instep contact. I'll get kind of a feathery light contact, and that's as good as it's ever been. I really want to get stronger contact there, I just don't know if it's possible with my foot dimensions since it never has been yet regardless of sizing down as much as possible.
This is 90% of the prep (IMHO)...knowing what you want, where you can make sacrifices in fit, and where you need better. Express this to your boot fitter, make sure he knows a better instep fit is your primary focus and end goal. It's up to him to determine what boot will fit those needs.
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
This is 90% of the prep (IMHO)...knowing what you want, where you can make sacrifices in fit, and where you need better. Express this to your boot fitter, make sure he knows a better instep fit is your primary focus and end goal. It's up to him to determine what boot will fit those needs.

Thanks! I did emphasize this to him, so we'll see what he comes up with. I mean, it might end up that I need some type of aftermarket liner etc. since I've never found a boot small enough in that area. We'll see though, I'm so curious to see what he tries putting me in. I was even thinking today, hmmmm could I ever fit into a 22.5?? lol I really doubt it though.
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Thanks, this is pretty much exactly what I've done. Found out when stock would be in and set an appointment for a weekday morning start bright and early. My bootfitter also does a ton of racer bootfitting which is comforting. He was previously a racer himself and was well known by one of my past bootfitters at Sunday River who was also in that world but went elsewhere for work now. It's funny how small the ski world really is in New England.

I definitely plan to wear shorts and my thinnest ski socks (threadbare Smartwools lol).

I do NOT have any recent videos of my skiing so that does kind of stink. I didn't think of that, otherwise I would have tried to get some last season.. Will keep that in mind for the future.
Yes, the competent New England bootfitting world is very small. Who is this bootfitter? I may know him, or of him. Have fun getting new boots!! :thumb:
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Honestly, my only concern is my darn uber low instep.. I know that everything else is possible to get right. Length is easy, width is doable the way this bootfitter does it for me, alignment is a pain but doable.. the one thing I've NEVER had is good instep contact. I'll get kind of a feathery light contact, and that's as good as it's ever been. I really want to get stronger contact there, I just don't know if it's possible with my foot dimensions since it never has been yet regardless of sizing down as much as possible.
I also have a non-existent instep. I've had bootfitters tell me that volume measurement they do with the tape measure that starts behind the heel, goes up and around the ankle, then back down to where it started is extremely small. Grrr.

My bootfitter raised up my foot by adding a shim under the bootboard, then had to modify the shell around my foot in spots to provide appropriate space for my knobby parts.
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Thanks! I did emphasize this to him, so we'll see what he comes up with. I mean, it might end up that I need some type of aftermarket liner etc. since I've never found a boot small enough in that area. We'll see though, I'm so curious to see what he tries putting me in. I was even thinking today, hmmmm could I ever fit into a 22.5?? lol I really doubt it though.
When I got my last boots I planned ahead to toss the original liner and replace it with a Zip Fit on day one. My guy ordered that liner ahead of time so it would be there. That liner worked. Have you considered something like this? Expensive, but that issue doesn't hurt as much as a poorly fitting boot.
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
Nope, I don't know many people over in that part of the ski world. Are you an Okemo skier?

No, I actually ski at Sunday River in Maine (I know total opposite direction from me in MA lol, not as far though.. 2.5 versus 4 hours each way).. But I've continuously made the trek to go back to Torin whenever I have an issue now because I haven't found anyone closer that has been anywhere near as good or better where I live or ski. Literally other bootfitters CANNOT figure out how to deal with my forefoot. Torin has dealt with that on 3 pairs of boots for me now perfectly when I was left in immense pain from everyone else who couldn't fix me after repeatedly trying to. It is SOOOOOOOO weird to me that others can't do this for me. Shame on me for not going to him sooner to start fresh versus having him be the fixer only. Hopefully we can get it right on this one. He's always been very patient with my antics and didn't even charge me the last few times I was there. I think he's just been waiting until I came to my senses and actually did this with him lol.

When I announced that I was finally ready to get new boots (would have been last year if it weren't for the Covid travel restrictions in VT) his response was that he couldn't wait to build me a pair of boots. I found that such an interesting way of putting it. Build.. And then when I was trying to figure out a time to head up he was like the earlier the better, it's going to be a long day! It all just gives me confidence that we are not going to leave any stone unturned and that we are both aware that out of the box is not anything that will ever work for me. It's going to take a bunch of work for sure.
 

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