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TRX suspension training, what do you think?

#81
I just assumed this because yesterday we did a lot of planking exercises in class and the instructor kept specifying to have your feet directly under the anchor hanging point. Of course I haven’t tried it in any other way because I don’t have my own straps at home. Good to know you are still able to do these exercises without the ceiling mount.
It's a good question. My trainer assumed the same thing before I started using TRX at home with a door mount. She was usually surprised when I would try a new exercise at home that was based on being directly under the anchor and tell her later that it worked fine. While directing people to have feet directly under the anchor makes sense in a class with an overhead mount, it's not necessary for plank exercises.

Couldn't find a picture or video of using a TRX on a fence, but came up with a Canadian blog entry that lists all sorts of ways to mount a TRX.

https://www.aliveandwellfitness.ca/trx-band-setup/
1-6: indoor options
7-10: outdoor options
Screen Shot 2019-06-25 at 10.19.36 AM.png
 
#82
Came across a couple things related to TRX while looking for a picture of a fence mount. Note that the same exercises can be done with other suspension straps. The TRX business model goes beyond just selling quality hardware, so that's one reason it's all over fitness centers and online fitness websites. Cheaper variations of suspension straps are readily available.

https://www.pastemagazine.com/articles/2017/07/bodies-in-balance-trx.html
by Sara Lindberg, a freelance writer specializing in health, fitness and wellness

"The first time I set foot in a TRX class, I felt confident (and maybe even a bit cocky), about sweating it out for a 45-minute class. After all, I’ve spent decades pumping iron, so how hard could a set of straps hanging from the ceiling really be. Well, about 10 minutes in, my muscles were shaking, my core was on fire, and we were just finishing the warm-up. The instructor, who I desperately wished would have a bathroom emergency, reminded the class that a “full-body workout using a suspension trainer is a lot harder than it looks,” and I swear she was staring right at me.
. . .
Even though my first TRX class challenged every part of my body in ways I didn’t know were possible, I stuck with it, and returned the next week for another workout. And the next week and the next, until I finally ended up buying a TRX system for my house. I’ve been incorporating this style of functional training into my overall fitness program for the past two years and have discovered how easy (and beneficial) it is to mix things up with the TRX Suspension Trainer.

In fact, whether you’re a dedicated gym rat, like myself, and use it to complement your strength training workouts or a distance runner who makes it the main form of resistance training for your overall fitness, the countless exercises available, will help you attack your core, increase mobility and flexibility, and build strength. Frankel [former Navy Seal inventor] says that “using your TRX work as accessory exercises or as a stand-alone strength training modality will increase your results by addressing stabilizer and synergistic muscles.”

If you’re looking for a way to get a killer total body workout in without jumping back and forth between weight equipment and dumbbells, then you might want to give Suspension Training a try. Made for indoor and outdoor use, the portability of this workout system allows users to secure the straps to a sturdy structure in their house, or take their training outside and throw it over a tree branch, chain link fence, or even the monkey bars at your kids favorite playground. And the best part: Frankel says the TRX system weighs less than two pounds, fits into any travel bag and takes less than 30 seconds to set up. Quick and easy is always a bonus when it comes to committing to an exercise program.
. . ."

Introduction in the snow by a fencer, in Europe somewhere, 2 min
 
#83
During my PT last summer for a torn meniscus, they had me use the TRX for squats. I didn’t think that was much different than holding onto a counter, for example. Well, I got sent back to PT three weeks ago because the knee has been more painful lately. This time, they had me use the TRX for single-leg squats and eccentric single-leg squats. Wow, that is a whole another ball of no fun (in a good way!). It challenges both my core and balance while giving me support all at the same time. I can’t think of a single way I can do that at home. I tried holding onto a chair, for example, but it throws off my form and the chair is too stable. I might have to look into getting a setup at home.
Hope PT will help. Always good to learn new exercise options from a professional. I stretched out by PT sessions after my knee injury in order to learn as much as possible even after I stopped going weekly.

I'd stopped doing hamstring strengthening exercises as regularly in the last couple years. Doesn't make much difference for daily living, but I noticed a difference when skiing challenging terrain even though my technique is better than a few years ago. It's a priority to get back to the level I was at a year or two after knee rehab.

What I learned using TRX in the first year after knee rehab is how to vary the amount of support I was getting from TRX for exercises such as squats or 1-leg exercises facing forward (no feet in straps). My focus was general skiing conditioning while continuing to strengthen support for knees. A couple of my Over 50 fitness blog entries related to knees include TRX exercises.

Here's a 2 min video that shows how to learn good form for deep squats with help, but not always full support, from a TRX
 
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#84
Haven't looked around for videos about TRX and knee rehab for quite a while. Found the one that initially made me more curious about trying the TRX with a trainer.


The TRX was first sold in 2005. By 2012, it had become a standard piece of equipment for some physical therapy offices. I think the uses for the TRX and similar body weight straps continues to evolve because of how many different ways it can be used by people of all fitness levels.

 
#85
For anyone looking to take using a TRX to the next level for balance and stability training, here are ideas for combining TRX with BOSU. I've been looking over my fitness blog TRX entries and apparently I found this on the TRX website back in July 2016. Haven't tried the exercises yet. The progressions could be used without the BOSU to increase difficulty. I went from plank to crunch to atomic push up with my personal trainer a while back.

https://www.trxtraining.com/train/a-smart-approach-to-balance-training

TRX/Bosu Squat:
Strap Length will vary. Standing Facing your anchor point.
Level 1: Squat (Flat side up)
Level 2: Squat w/band (Flat side up)
Level 3: OH Squat (Flat side up)

TRX/Bosu Plank:
Strap Length will vary. Standing Facing away from your anchor point.
Level 1: Plank
Level 2: Crunch
Level 3: Atomic Push up

TRX/Bosu Split Lunge:
Strap Length will vary. Standing Facing your anchor point.
Level 1: Split Lunge
Level 2: Balance Lunge
Level 3: Crossing Balance Lunge
 
#88
Hope PT will help. Always good to learn new exercise options from a professional. I stretched out by PT sessions after my knee injury in order to learn as much as possible even after I stopped going weekly.

I'd stopped doing hamstring strengthening exercises as regularly in the last couple years. Doesn't make much difference for daily living, but I noticed a difference when skiing challenging terrain even though my technique is better than a few years ago. It's a priority to get back to the level I was at a year or two after knee rehab.

What I learned using TRX in the first year after knee rehab is how to vary the amount of support I was getting from TRX for exercises such as squats or 1-leg exercises facing forward (no feet in straps). My focus was general skiing conditioning while continuing to strengthen support for knees. A couple of my Over 50 fitness blog entries related to knees include TRX exercises.

Here's a 2 min video that shows how to learn good form for deep squats with help, but not always full support, from a TRX
I do those with my trainer!!!!
 
#90
Ooh...TRX is running 25% off on their website. Still a chunk of change though.
Well, I think of buying exercise gear for home use as an investment for the long term. Much in the same way as I'm willing to pay for semi-private ski lessons or better ski boots as my ski abilities evolve. The $100 I spent for a private lesson at Massanutten with the resident Examiner was well worth it. Same for the $100 I spent for the TRX.
 
#91
Which level of straps does everyone have at home?
I bought a kit originally designed for use by U.S. military off craigslist. (Met the seller in the parking lot outside REI.) The straps are slightly heavier weight than the older home version my personal trainer has. That's called Tactical on the TRX website. For travel, I also bought the lighter weight version TRX sold for a little while (grey, no longer available from TRX). Have also used the professional version at the gym. The only noticeable difference when actually exercising is the materials for the handle. HOME2 has foam while the more expensive versions are rubber. The foot cradles are adjustable even on the home version now.

The mechanism for changing the length of the straps has evolved. The current variation is slightly easier, but it's not a big deal.

I wouldn't hesitate to buy a used TRX if the price was low enough. Pretty easy to inspect the straps for wear before using. YMMV

Does that help?
 

MissySki

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#92
I bought a kit originally designed for use by U.S. military off craigslist. (Met the seller in the parking lot outside REI.) The straps are slightly heavier weight than the older home version my personal trainer has. That's called Tactical on the TRX website. For travel, I also bought the lighter weight version TRX sold for a little while (grey, no longer available from TRX). Have also used the professional version at the gym. The only noticeable difference when actually exercising is the materials for the handle. HOME2 has foam while the more expensive versions are rubber. The foot cradles are adjustable even on the home version now.

The mechanism for changing the length of the straps has evolved. The current variation is slightly easier, but it's not a big deal.

I wouldn't hesitate to buy a used TRX if the price was low enough. Pretty easy to inspect the straps for wear before using. YMMV

Does that help?

Yes, thank you! I was looking on Ebay and saw some pro models, but also a lot more “basic” models which are cheaper. So I was curious what people tended toward who have them at home already. Haven’t checked locally on Craigslist or Facebook yard sale groups, but I’ll do that first as it would be nice to inspect the condition in person before purchasing.
 
#93
After the discussion about using TRX with a door mount, I brought along my travel TRX on a short trip this week. (DD is doing college orientation for incoming freshmen, which includes staying overnight. :smile:) Turned out that the motel room I got has a connecting door. It's the set up where rooms next to each other have a door leading to the other room, so to connect both doors have to be unlocked. That made it easy to set up the TRX on a fully locked door with more than enough room.

TRX door.jpg
 

Ski Sine Fine

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#94
Okay, I’m convinced. I’m going to order directly from TRX. Apparently there are counterfeits floating around out there. I have a basement bathroom door that is perfect for this.
 
#95
Okay, I’m convinced. I’m going to order directly from TRX. Apparently there are counterfeits floating around out there. I have a basement bathroom door that is perfect for this.
One advantage of ordering direct is that you can get replacement parts that aren't sold separately. I lost the outdoor mounting strap for the Tactical version on a trip some how. Without a serial number, couldn't easily get that part replaced. That's one reason I decided to get the lightweight kit when it was on sale.
 
#96
@Ski Sine Fine let us know how the TRX works out for you!

I had one once, a long time ago, and ended up selling it to my personal trainer. Probably should've kept it.
 

Ski Sine Fine

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#97
The TRX came very quickly, which is a bit of a surprise for free shipping. I have it set up over a basement bathroom door with plenty of room in front. The straps are thick and heavy duty. The whole thing has a nice heft and quality feel to it. The box comes with a large fold-out poster of basic exercises. It also has a card with a code to activate a 1-year subscription to the TRX app. I’m not finding the app to be that useful yet. I was looking for how to vary the difficulty level and I couldn’t find it in the app but I did find it on their website via google. I can download exercise routines to the app, but I haven’t really checked any of them out yet.

I did a few exercises from the poster and from the internet. The setup feels very solid. The toughest one so far is hamstring curls. It just kills me. I’m going to sign up for the TRX class at the local county Rec Center to learn how to do the exercises correctly. All in all, a good choice for getting my legs ready for next season and just overall fitness.
 

VickiK

Angel Diva
#98
The reason I sold mine was because I felt it wasn't secure on a hollow core bedroom door in my condo (for me or the door).
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
#99
The reason I sold mine was because I felt it wasn't secure on a hollow core bedroom door in my condo (for me or the door).
You're in California, doesn't everyone exercise outdoors? :wink:

I've set up my TRX in a fitness center a few times. Usually at a resort or motel/hotel.
 
All in all, a good choice for getting my legs ready for next season and just overall fitness.
I decided to buy a TRX for home use after my trainer showed me how to stretch with it.


I’m not finding the app to be that useful yet. I was looking for how to vary the difficulty level and I couldn’t find it in the app but I did find it on their website via google. I can download exercise routines to the app, but I haven’t really checked any of them out yet.
I found most of the TRX exercises more than I was interested in doing. Meaning too hard. That's one reason I started a blog to store stuff that I find useful, especially short videos. Even though the title is Over 50 Ski Fitness for Skiing Adventures, some of the examples are good for younger adults, and a few are good for getting started with exercising after 60 or 70 even if skiing is not of interest. Developing and maintaining good balance is important for seniors over 80, 90, or 100.

All this discussion has prompted me to update the TRX and knee sections of my fitness blog (no ads).
 

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