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Tips for intermediates over 40 planning to ski until 70+

gardenmary

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#81
So Cal Divas, I reread this thread in the gym today.
It definitely contains some good advice.

We should plan on a Women's Clinic next season.
I'm definitely setting one up at Snowbasin during Diva Week. Also, Womens' Edventures does one at Summit and also at Homewood at Tahoe. I've done that clinic 3 times and loved it. There's always the stuff at Mammoth too.
 
#82
bump since there is already snow to be seen on North American mountain tops.

Quite a few people have mentioned lessons as useful. For those who haven't compared prices of lessons between large destination resorts and smaller ones in the same vicinity, you may be surprised at how much difference can exist. It's more a function of a ski resort's primary target market, not the quality of a ski school. Meaning a ski school that charges $100+/hour for a private lesson is not necessarily better than one that charges $50/hour. For example, Big Sky and Bridger both have excellent ski schools but completely different pricing because they are different types of ski areas. Big Sky is a large destination resort with relatively high lift ticket prices and plenty of very nice ski in/out accommodations. Bridger is a non-profit ski area with essentially no lodging closer than a 20-min drive and caters more to locals or those who know how good the terrain is there. Similar situations for the destination resorts vs "local" ski areas around Tahoe, Colorado, Vermont, or even the mid-Atlantic.

Beginners who are renting equipment should look for package deals. Sometimes lessons are essentially free with a package that includes lift ticket and ski rental. Even a few places that offer a season pass after a certain number of beginner lessons.

Intermediates who can make it to the slopes midweek once or twice a season may find that group lessons are a great deal. A midweek group lesson can turn into a private lesson at smaller places or have only 2-3 students at a destination resort. Going during early or late season increases the chance of fewer students.
 

CMCM

Certified Ski Diva
#83
I have it and like it....I love everything Lito has done. I have 3 of his videos and have almost worn them out watching them. I'll add they are the most beautifully done and watchable ski videos I've yet seen. Every year just before the season starts, and begin watching them and even after a gazillion viewings, I'm always pickup up new things I'd missed before. Then when I'm up skiing, I often try things I saw him do and I remember what he said, and I can't emphasize enough how much I've learned and improved from what I've seen on his CD's. They are worth every penny!
 
#84
Love the Lito stuff as well . . .
And he seems like a nice guy. I emailed him once about a problem . . . and he actually replied! With a thoughtful and very helpful response.

Think he's retired now but what a great thing he did with his books and videos. He improved my skiing tremendously.
 

marta

Angel Diva
#85
Lito's pointers about skiing bumps are spot on. You don't need to bang your way down. Just dance softly between them. Skiing bumps doesn't need to be harsh or only for young knees.
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#86
I'm not a great bump skier myself, but I think the "dance" idea nails the concept. Really great bump skiers have a level of finesse that makes it look easy.
 

marta

Angel Diva
#87
Once you learn to dance, it's more like a slither, you stop avoiding bump runs and start wanting them... He says don't pick a zipper line, travel all around and wherever you feel like turning turn.
 

annetteski

Certified Ski Diva
#88
Women's ski weeks rock!
Would also advocate for mixing in some cross country skiing. No matter how old you get, if you can walk, you can ski.
Avoid ice.
 

MI-skier

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#89
While I learned to "ski" as a teenager, it wasn't until I was into my 50s that I took it seriously. Now, late in my 60s I ski better than ever. I can ski about anything. Some things look better than others!
My advice:
Stay fit.
Ski often and long. back-to-back days are better for improving. Take a trip with a club for a week.
Take lessons. Spend more on lessons than equipment.
Ski with people better and fitter than you.
Use decent equipment.
Have a great time, every time. When someone says, "act your age!" Tell them you ARE acting your age. Give a Rebel yell getting off the lift. That is always invigorating; and it keeps the lift operators on their toes.



That just made me laugh MAO!!! Your women rock!


 

SkiBilly

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#90
This thread is a great read! I stared skiing when I was 38...so coming up 10 years.
I plan to retire as a ski bum and ski until the 'end'.

I also endorse staying fit all year round; not just for the ski season. I live in a hilly place and there are three sets of steps intersecting the suburban roads that lead to the train station. There are 220 steps in total and I do them 5 times (it takes 30 mins) on 5 days of the week. I will also swap jogging to mix it up a bit. I'm also joining a gym so I can do a weight training program...as I'm nearing 50 I think regular weights is needed to maintain my muscle mass for my whole body.

And for those ladies who are "going through the change", I have some menopausal tips too...

Do other Divas have problems with getting incredibly over heated? I sweat heaps so I usually only wear one layer. I find polypropylene works best...wool just gets too hot. However I wear wool socks as my toes do still get cold, but I spray antiperspirant on my feet so they don't sweat. My hands sweat too, so I start with liners and have a spare dry pair for after lunch, but usually I don't use them...just shove my hands into my leather gloves. Mittens are too hot and the leather works well to keep my hands warm on the chair lift (mostly, sometimes the tips freeze a bit, but it's not long into a run before they warm up). Needless to say I look like a dishevelled mess when I go in for lunch but the beauty of being a 'mature' skier is that I don't care one bit as I reach for the menu to fan myself!

Hope this helps anyone who is in my situation ;-)
 

Dianna

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#92
This is a great thread!!! So much great advice. Many resorts are finding offering Seniors clinics are a good thing and have reduced rates for the clinic with lift tickets and rentals also.

Learning to ski not only changed my life, it gave it back to me and opened up a world of possibilities!
I took my very first ski lesson at age 48 and 4 years into recovery from being a pedestrian run over by a 1-ton dually pulling a gooseneck trailer. Yep, they both ran over me. I always loved SNOW and found out about the Adaptive program at the local mountain and my very first lesson was hooked for life. Skiing isn't only great for physical fitness but also great for mental fitness. I was 50% still in my wheelchair when I started skiing. Now five years later I almost solely use my forearm crutches and ski/board with outriggers. I may be a lame duck in the parking lot, but I am a swan on the slopes and pretty much an advanced level on both. But in the summer you have to keep active and fit or the slopes can feel like a brutal work out. I live in a hilly area on the lake in Mo. During the off season. The road around our house is 1 mile of up down hills and a great work out for me and I canoe on the lake with kayak paddles for upper body and core.
I also use ankle weights sometimes especially in the fall to get use to the weight of having ski boots on. I am a firm believer in lessons and no matter how good you get there is always something to learn to make you better and improve your enjoyment of snow sports.
 

Serafina

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#93
Rock on, honey!! I love it when I get smoked on some run by a skier accompanied by AbilityPlus staff (our adaptive ski program). Last winter I kept getting lapped by a guy with one leg. Every time he blasted past me on the run it made me think about just how wonderful life is.
 

NZfarmgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#95
Gotta love adaptive. I can't help but laugh to myself when someone tells me they can't ski because there knee bothers them a bit.
I love seeing people get out on the mountain regardless of their physical limitations. I know just how much better the mountains make me feel about everything, and I'm sure it's very mentally healing after such a serious injury to be able to go fast down that beautiful, swishy white snow.
 

soliloquy72

Certified Ski Diva
#97
I'm quite similar to the OP.

I "learned" to ski (self-taught) as a teenager on ski hills in WI. I saved up to buy my own skis and went as often as I could. I took a few trips out west (Beaver Creek and Heavenly) in my late teens and early twenties but due to school, funds, and time constraints didn't ski all that much.

Fast foward to my 40th year. We move to northern Idaho. A short drive from Schweitzer. YEAH! Holy cow, skis aren't straight sticks anymore! What are those fat things? Lol.

I've still never had a professional lesson (planning on it, but getting my 4 kids all outfitted and in lessons consumed the budget) and am trying to learn what I can from youtube and talking to my kids' instructors. (And yes, I do slow down and eavesdrop when I happen to pass someone having a private lesson.) I try to challenge myself every week to focus on one aspect of my form or to tackle a new type of terrain.

I do hope to ski as long as possible. I was not kind to my body for a number of years. Marathon runner, not eating enough, etc. I'm working on rebuilding and strengthening so I'll keep going for a long time.

And I'm hoping to learn a lot here. I enjoy all the ski chatter. :smile:
 
#98
When booking a private lesson in the U.S., try to get a personal recommendation for a PSIA Level 2 with 5+ years of experience or better yet, a Level 3 with 10+ years of experience. If can't get a name, start by asking for a Level 3 instructor.

Recently saw advice given to a newly minted Level 1 instructor. Gives some insight into the dedication that goes into passing the Level 2 or 3 exams (teaching, skiing).

"Now, hone your craft... Teach, teach & teach some more. Ski, ski & ski some more, ideally with the best you can find. If not go solo, go before line up, go at the end of the day & go in between. Ski while you teach & teach while you ski.

Watch, listen, learn... Practice!"
 
#99
Gotta love adaptive. I can't help but laugh to myself when someone tells me they can't ski because there knee bothers them a bit.
Dianna, I've got a great story similar to that. I hope to tell it to you on the slopes some time, maybe next season if California gets some decent snow.
 

Ski Junkie

Diva in Training
I'm quite similar to the OP.

I "learned" to ski (self-taught) as a teenager on ski hills in WI. I saved up to buy my own skis and went as often as I could. I took a few trips out west (Beaver Creek and Heavenly) in my late teens and early twenties but due to school, funds, and time constraints didn't ski all that much.

Fast foward to my 40th year. We move to northern Idaho. A short drive from Schweitzer. YEAH! Holy cow, skis aren't straight sticks anymore! What are those fat things? Lol.

I've still never had a professional lesson (planning on it, but getting my 4 kids all outfitted and in lessons consumed the budget) and am trying to learn what I can from youtube and talking to my kids' instructors. (And yes, I do slow down and eavesdrop when I happen to pass someone having a private lesson.) I try to challenge myself every week to focus on one aspect of my form or to tackle a new type of terrain.

I do hope to ski as long as possible. I was not kind to my body for a number of years. Marathon runner, not eating enough, etc. I'm working on rebuilding and strengthening so I'll keep going for a long time.

And I'm hoping to learn a lot here. I enjoy all the ski chatter. :smile:

I haven't been able to afford lessons yet either and love YouTube videos too for instruction. Eventually, I'll take a lesson, but for now those videos really are helpful. It's fun to learn a new skill online and then try it out in the real world. I love the eavesdropping tip. Thanks for that. ;) I also have a balance board as part of my training regime now.

That's fantastic to be so close to a resort. Season pass!!
 

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