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TheSkiDiva's Rules of Skiing

#21
Zipper Check before you leave the lodge.
I like this one, too.
DEDICATED POCKETS! NEVER open the car keys pocket. NEVER open the money/credit card pocket until needed.

OMG, what I see beneath the chairs some days....:eek: One day, we rescued THREE smart phones in one fell swoop! Same chairlift.
 

MaryLou

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#22
1 - When dressing for ski day think about what it would be like if you were stuck on the chairlift for an hour. Under-dressing always backfires.

2 - No breaks unless 100% necessary. On cold days a lodge/beer break is okay, but otherwise, no breaks. Okay...last week at Mad River Glen, soft bumps from 9:30-4:30...we took 20 mins for lunch (actually, that was our limit, it was 19).

3 - If it's a cold, crusty, icey groomer type day, in the name of body preservation, take the day off.

4. Assigned pockets, try to keep same stuff in same pockets every day.

5. Ski until it's not humanly possible or kids don't allow it (except for #3 days above lol).
 
#24
Beacons: "on at the car, off at the bar." (or car for the last one too...)

Pole straps off in the backcountry.

at the top of a skin: zippers up, boots down - pocket zippers closed, ventilation zippers closed, boots in ski mode and buckled down.
 

bounceswoosh

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#25
1 - When dressing for ski day think about what it would be like if you were stuck on the chairlift for an hour. Under-dressing always backfires.
LOL. I do the opposite - if I'm not sure, I dress to be a little cool, rather than a little warm. Otherwise I sweat like a pig when I'm moving, and then I'm cold and wet, rather than just cold. But I sang a different tune when I was skiing on the east coast. And I have a lot of, er, natural insulation. And if I were skiing with little kids or anyone else with whom I expected to stop a lot, I'd probably dress warmer.

As for skiing itself, my number one rule is to have fun. Whatever that means on that day. Some days, the best fun is to sleep in and have a late, big, restaurant breakfast rather than skiing in the morning =P
 

MaryLou

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#26
LOL. I do the opposite - if I'm not sure, I dress to be a little cool, rather than a little warm. Otherwise I sweat like a pig when I'm moving, and then I'm cold and wet, rather than just cold. But I sang a different tune when I was skiing on the east coast. And I have a lot of, er, natural insulation. And if I were skiing with little kids or anyone else with whom I expected to stop a lot, I'd probably dress warmer.

As for skiing itself, my number one rule is to have fun. Whatever that means on that day. Some days, the best fun is to sleep in and have a late, big, restaurant breakfast rather than skiing in the morning =P
Don't know what it is like in the West, but my house 6 miles from the ski area can be vastly different than the mountain. And it can be vastly different from top to bottom of mountain. And from AM to PM. Can't ever predict. I find if I get sweaty on a run, I can cool down on the lift ride up.
 

theBuff

Certified Ski Diva
#27
Don't know what it is like in the West, but my house 6 miles from the ski area can be vastly different than the mountain. And it can be vastly different from top to bottom of mountain. And from AM to PM. Can't ever predict. I find if I get sweaty on a run, I can cool down on the lift ride up.
This is an interesting one for me. I can't decide if I'd rather be warmer on a run and comfortable on the lift or cool on the lift and comfortable on the run. I think it depends on the mountain I'm skiing. I live in Western PA, so I think I go for chair comfort here because the runs aren't long enough for me to really break a sweat. However, skiing big mountains, I want to be comfortable on those longer runs, so I take the chill on the lift . . . and pack a layer in the ol' backpack. :eyebrows:
 

MaryLou

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#28
This is an interesting one for me. I can't decide if I'd rather be warmer on a run and comfortable on the lift or cool on the lift and comfortable on the run. I think it depends on the mountain I'm skiing. I live in Western PA, so I think I go for chair comfort here because the runs aren't long enough for me to really break a sweat. However, skiing big mountains, I want to be comfortable on those longer runs, so I take the chill on the lift . . . and pack a layer in the ol' backpack. :eyebrows:
If you have a backpack, you are good. It truly is a fear of mine to be stuck on a chairlift and freezing for an hour or two. Happened to me last winter, only for 20 mins but it was a very wet snow, and I became miserable quickly and cursed myself for assuming I'd be fine. So I don't mind a chill for a quick chairlift ride, it's the breakdowns that scare me! But I don't carry a backpack (but usually always hand warmers in pocket).
 
#29
at the top of a skin: zippers up, boots down - pocket zippers closed, ventilation zippers closed, boots in ski mode and buckled down.
I need to learn that one.

I have a lot of things I do habitually when I ski. But I don't think of them as "rules". Like, I dress for the chair ride rather than the bus ride (or the walk in the parking lot). And put on sunscreen even when the sun is not out...

If I count all the things I do in preparation to skiing, it'll take up the whole page (and some)!
The time spent driving should not exceed the time spent skiing.

Broke this one when we drove to Åre for 3 days. 30 hours of driving, only 21 hours of skiing.
I have a similar rule which I often violate! :wink:

Am about to do that later today: drive 10 hours round trip to ski (at most) 6 hrs!
 

mahgnillig

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#30
Quit when the conditions deteriorate.

This is something I've been doing more lately as I find skiing in the unpredictable grabby spring slush to be more worrying than fun. I don't mind cold or windy or blizzard conditions... the weather deteriorating is fine as long as I know I can get home at the end of the day. It's when the snow deteriorates that I quit... I'd rather not blow out a knee on a slushy traverse.
 
#31
Quit when the conditions deteriorate.

This is something I've been doing more lately as I find skiing in the unpredictable grabby spring slush to be more worrying than fun. I don't mind cold or windy or blizzard conditions... the weather deteriorating is fine as long as I know I can get home at the end of the day. It's when the snow deteriorates that I quit... I'd rather not blow out a knee on a slushy traverse.
OK, I have one rule I rarely violate: "Quit when it's no long fun!"

Whether it's due to deteriorating condition or just poor condition from the start, or my getting tired, or just weather I'm not dressed to enjoy, I quit.

Like last Sunday, condition was decent and I was having fun for a few hours. But because I bike (hard) the day before, I simply didn't have the normal stamina as usual. My legs were toast at 3 o'clock. So, although there's still an hour left in the day, and even the condition were still fine, I left when I was ahead. I hate to end the day with a string of "bad" runs simply because my legs were no longer working...
 

litterbug

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#32
OK, I have one rule I rarely violate: "Quit when it's no long fun!"
Corollary: Try not to get stuck at the top of a long hard run (or an OK run in bad or bumpy condition) when it becomes no more fun.

I never want to leave even when I'm completely gumby, but late in the day I try to stop for a minute at the bottom of the lift, no matter how wonderful it's been, and evaluate my legs, blood sugar, etc. to see if a) I need to break out a snack for the lift or b) I am going to become unhappy with my skiing halfway down. I'm not sure how much oomph I have left, I become one of those people who do quick laps on the green runs because the consequences of my legs going out are much lower.
 
#33
I like this one, too.
DEDICATED POCKETS! NEVER open the car keys pocket. NEVER open the money/credit card pocket until needed.
My car key goes into an internal pocket, with zipper!

Outside pockets are for trail map, tissue and other stuff I might want access any time of the day.

Phone doesn't get answered unless I'm on the ground! That's partly because I'm not familiar with how long each lift takes so I have this fear I might have to unload half way through the call. (I know a lot of people answer their phone on the chair. I don't know how they do that)
 

litterbug

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#34
No phone. Lift pass in right ski pant pocket which is never unzipped unless I'm washing the pants. Lip balm with car valet key and ski rack key in left pocket, always zipped. Debit card & driver's license in rear pocket, always zipped except when in use. Everything else is optional. No pack because I will fill it up if given the opportunity!
 
#35
OK, I have one rule I rarely violate: "Quit when it's no long fun!"

Whether it's due to deteriorating condition or just poor condition from the start, or my getting tired, or just weather I'm not dressed to enjoy, I quit.
That's one of my newer ones. I used to think that if I've driven all the way there and paid for my lift ticket, I needed to squeeze every bit of skiing out of the day as I could. No more. Now I cut my losses if it's crappy conditions. We only skied 2 hours last Sunday due to the mashed potatoes.
 

drjoyous

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#37
My rule that ALWAYS comes true:
"Whatever you THINK you can't do you WILL do by the end (or middle) of the season. And wonder why you thought you couldn't do it."

E.v.e.r.y single year this is true.
 

dloveski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#38
1. Try something new/challenging each ski day.
2. Don't use cell phone on the lift, ever, or answer--let 'er ring.
3. Don't go out of bounds with my host jacket on (not my rule--but one I abide by).
4. Don't get discouraged with my gaper days---and don't get cocky when I nail it. Just ski and appreciate whatever me shows up that day.

5. On occasion----dare to take that last run----some of the best adventures for me have been on runs I almost did not take. (I know I'll take some Diva blowback on this one---but it's true for me).
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
#39
2. Don't use cell phone on the lift, ever, or answer--let 'er ring.
I'm with you on this. I'd probably end up dropping it, so I don't bother.

The "don't take a last run" thing doesn't bother me. At least it hasn't yet. :D

My rule is this: No skiing in the rain.

I know, I know, the snow is nice and soft. My problem is twofold; 1) I hate getting wet. Even if I'm wearing Gore-Tex. Yuk; and 2) I can't see when there's rain on my goggles. Maybe if I had windshield wipers? :D
 
#40
My rule is this: No skiing in the rain.

I know, I know, the snow is nice and soft. My problem is twofold; 1) I hate getting wet. Even if I'm wearing Gore-Tex. Yuk; and 2) I can't see when there's rain on my goggles. Maybe if I had windshield wipers? :D
That's one of those "broken" rules of mine. :wink: It happened when I thought I'd do "just one more run before the rain gets real heavy". Well, the rain never got heavy and the skiing was just too fun to quit. So the "one more run" turned into the whole afternoon! :smile:

So I change my rule to "no skiing in heavy downpour". I'll see if this rule gets broken:rolleyes:

The water in the goggle part I just got used to. To ski when it's snowing is to have snow on the goggle and the need to stop half way to clear it. Rain is the same issue.

I think I broke the "no skiing in rain" rule mostly because of the newer tech wears. I really don't get wet INSIDE of me even when the outside of my jacket is quite wet.
 

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