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Tell me about your ski quiver!

Elizabeth.I

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I love talking gear so tell me about your quiver! And better yet, are you buying any new skis this season?? Which ones?? I do almost 50-50 between resort and backcountry so my quiver is:

Resort:
Moment Wildcat 116 (179cm)
Moment Deathwish 112 (174cm)
Volkl Mantra 102 (177cm)

Backcountry:
Moment Wildcat Tour (174cm)
4FRNT Raven (177cm)
Moment Sierra (172cm)

I plan on buying the Moment Sierra tours this year to replace my current full weight sierras for ski mountaineering missions! It'll be nice to lighten up the set-up for those huge days.

I ski kicking horse for resort (Lake Louise in fall and spring) and Rogers Pass/Canadian Rockies for backcountry.

Looking forward to hearing from others!
 

martitheparty

Diva in Training
Hi! I love gear research and gear talk too and really appreciate the discussion and feedback on this forum. About me: 37 years old skiing since a wee bebe, 5’5”ish tall, 145 lbs, about 50/50 resort (Red Mountain Rossland) and touring (mainly all over the Kootenays). Aiming for more touring this season with the help of a new-to-me sled (VERY junior sledder).

Here's the quiver (happy to give more detailed impressions):
Resort:
2013 Rossi S7 women’s (178 cm) with Marker Barons
2018 Icelantic Nomad 105 (171 cm) with Telemark 7TM bindings for some knee-dropping silliness
Resort boots are Lange XT 130 Freetour LV for alpine and BD Stilleto for tele.

Touring:
2015 Dynastar Cham107 women’s (175 cm) with Dynafit ST rotations
Old ass Movement Goliath Sluff (174 cm) with even older Dynafits – originally my lighter touring ski (ha!) and now a back up/rock ski (considering slapping some non-touring bindings on them).
Touring boots are the La Sportiva Vanguard women’s

2015 Yamaha Viper SR – 4 stroke pony called Black Beauty mostly for touring/hut access.

Looking to purchase a new touring set up to add to the quiver because….if you buy it, snow will come? Skis I am considering and would love input on are:

Icelantic Natural 111 (171 cm)
Moment Deathwish and Deathwish Tour 112 (174 cm)
Moment Wildcat Tour 116 (174 cm)
Black Crows Atris Birdie 21/22 version (169 cm)
Black Crows Ferox Freebird (171 cm)
Faction Agent 3.0x (172 cm)
RMU Valhalla 107 and Valhalla Tour (172 cm)
WNDR Alpine Intention 110 curious about the camber and reverse camber models
 

martitheparty

Diva in Training
Elizabeth: meant to quote you but forgot... very interested in your impressions of the Moment skis. How do the Wildcat Tour's compare to the Deathwish? I know there are lots of comparison's on Blister but I just still can't get a clear read on how they ski. Does the Deathwish feel more "planted" given the camber profile as opposed to the Wildcat's significantly more rockered tip and tail?
 

chasinghorizons

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Yay for more gearheads! I also love talking skis :D I'm 5'1" (155cm) / 115lbs. Haven't started touring yet, but hopefully will in the next season or two! In the meantime, my resort quiver is...


Faction Dictator 2.0x in 155cm. I have it mounted on the traditional line but plan to move it +2 so it doesn't need so much of a forward driving stance. I find it best for crowded groomer days, and early & late season when can't go off-piste. Good carver & great energy out of turns. (I do wish now that I had bought the 163cm though and that is the ski I am most likely to add to my quiver next - if I do get it, I'll mount it +3 due to the longer length and I'll sell the 155).

Liberty Genesis 101 in 158 (21/22 version with VMT): my tight terrain ski (trees & bumps) but also really good at everything else.

Faction Dictator 3.0x in 164, mounted on progressive line: love it for steeps/going fast & charging, although I sometimes wish it was skinnier when I'm on hard snow, which is why I long for the 2.0x in 163... Starting to feel like I could've mounted then even more forward, even though I'm happy with the progressive line too since it helps powder performance. Not good for mellow slopes or crowded days.

Line Sakana in 166: I haven't really skied these yet (only did 1-2 runs), but I suspect these will be good on smooth snow, and not so good in chop. Honestly I got these because I loved the fishtail idea and my husband got the Pescados. I plan to use for light/cold champagne pow. But for heavier pow...

Faction Candide 3.0x in 169 (20/21 version): there is a very long thread on skitalk forums devoted to the '21 CTs. They are supposedly amazing at practically everything (a true unicorn ski). Honestly I bought them because they are a steal on Sierra.com and Faction may never make them like this again - supposedly the '21 models are way heavier than any other year and thus exceedingly damp and smooth but also exceedingly maneuverable and fun due to the twin tip and also very good & energetic at carving. Looking forward to trying them this year. If I love them as much as I hope I will, I might also add the '21 CT 1.0 next as there are a bunch still available on skis.com and the-house.com and good sales come around frequently.


I also want to demo some Moment skis this winter! My husband loves his Deathwish 104 and wants me to get a Sierra to match :laughter:.
 

Elizabeth.I

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Elizabeth: meant to quote you but forgot... very interested in your impressions of the Moment skis. How do the Wildcat Tour's compare to the Deathwish? I know there are lots of comparison's on Blister but I just still can't get a clear read on how they ski. Does the Deathwish feel more "planted" given the camber profile as opposed to the Wildcat's significantly more rockered tip and tail?
Hmm...I'd say that the Wildcats actually feel like a more traditional ski than the Deathwish despite the rocker. The Deathwish is it's own magical, special thing! The Deathwish does feel more locked in when carving for sure but, interestingly enough, it is way slarvier and smearier than the Wildcats in soft snow. The Wildcats are very good for power carves in the powder but they don't really smear the same way. The Deathwish is just a very playful ski. Super fun to noodle around and just pop off random lumps and bumps you find along the way!

Both Moment skis you're looking at in the 174cm are quite nimble and can be skied at slow speeds (the 179cm full weight Wildcats actually feel more like my Volkls for stability and charginess!). I find the Deathwishes to be more fun tree skis just because you can smear between the trees rather than making "proper" turns. The Wildcat has a bit more float than the Deathwish but it's not that significant. My boyfriend has the Deathwish tours and he has skied them on incredibly deep days in Rogers Pass without any trouble!
Elizabeth: meant to quote you but forgot... very interested in your impressions of the Moment skis. How do the Wildcat Tour's compare to the Deathwish? I know there are lots of comparison's on Blister but I just still can't get a clear read on how they ski. Does the Deathwish feel more "planted" given the camber profile as opposed to the Wildcat's significantly more rockered tip and tail?
Sure! So Wildcat Tour vs full weight Deathwish...

I'd actually say that the wildcat feels more planted than the deathwish on everything but groomers/hardpack. It skis much more like a traditional ski overall. On groomers, the deathwish definitely carves better and bites in more (although the wildcat is surprisingly good for its width). Off piste, the deathwish is just its own magical ski. I've never been on anything like it! You can slarve and smear easily. It likes to just pop off any little lump or bump you may come across. Very playful and fun. The wildcat skis much more traditionally. You can drive the tips harder in deep snow than on the deathwish (you want to be slightly more centered on the deathwish in powder- even mounted at -1 from recommended as I did). Ive never used my wildcat tours in bounds, but between my resort wildcats (longer) and deathwish, I find I need to be more of a light and active skier on the deathwish in chop. It doesnt get deflected but it doesn't do well planted, whereas my wildcats just charge and destroy chop (but longer and different core than the tour version). The wildcats are for sure more planted in chop and powder. Sometimes I even use the resort wildcats instead of the deathwishes in bounds in shallow chop if I want to ski fast and aggressively rather than more chill and playful. Overall, I'd expect the same characteristics between the tour versions of both.

Despite other reviews I don't find the wildcats particularly smeary. It's really good for power carves in the powder. Float is surprisingly only a bit better than the deathwish. While both skis are responsive, nimble, and can be skied slowly, the deathwise is a more fun trees ski due to the aforementioned smearing abilities and is even more nimble. Both release from turns really easily due to the rocker.

You really can't go wrong between the 2 and I love them both. If you do decide to go deathwish, just get the tour version. My boyfriend has it and loves them. They're softer than the resort version but he really only notices it when the snow is hard and chunky (which is generally not what one is skiing in the backcountry). Don't bother with the extra weight of the full deathwish.

So summary, wildcats: they do have better float, can ski more traditionally, not smeary but still very responsive and nimble.

Deathwish: decent float, ski more centered and with a more active style if the snow is rough. Smeary and buttery, great tree ski and even more nimble than the wildcat.

I chose the wildcat for my powder ski (over the deathwish) as I wanted more float in the powder and the ability to drive the tips a bit harder in deeper snow. It's also pretty fun to do power carves in the powder. I really do prefer the wildcats in deeper snow although boyfriend uses his deathwishes on deep days in the backcountry just fine.

Hopefully that makes sense. It's mostly a bunch of random thoughts strung together. I'm always happy to answer more questions if you have any!
 

Elizabeth.I

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
@martitheparty , ignore my first reply. My second reply is the revised version that makes more sense since I didn't write it when I was tired haha

Also, I meant to say that the wildcat float is noticeably better but not significantly better (if that makes sense) than the deathwish. Also, wildcats are a great tree ski, just not as smeary and quick.
 

Elizabeth.I

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Yay for more gearheads! I also love talking skis :D I'm 5'1" (155cm) / 115lbs. Haven't started touring yet, but hopefully will in the next season or two! In the meantime, my resort quiver is...


Faction Dictator 2.0x in 155cm. I have it mounted on the traditional line but plan to move it +2 so it doesn't need so much of a forward driving stance. I find it best for crowded groomer days, and early & late season when can't go off-piste. Good carver & great energy out of turns. (I do wish now that I had bought the 163cm though and that is the ski I am most likely to add to my quiver next - if I do get it, I'll mount it +3 due to the longer length and I'll sell the 155).

Liberty Genesis 101 in 158 (21/22 version with VMT): my tight terrain ski (trees & bumps) but also really good at everything else.

Faction Dictator 3.0x in 164, mounted on progressive line: love it for steeps/going fast & charging, although I sometimes wish it was skinnier when I'm on hard snow, which is why I long for the 2.0x in 163... Starting to feel like I could've mounted then even more forward, even though I'm happy with the progressive line too since it helps powder performance. Not good for mellow slopes or crowded days.

Line Sakana in 166: I haven't really skied these yet (only did 1-2 runs), but I suspect these will be good on smooth snow, and not so good in chop. Honestly I got these because I loved the fishtail idea and my husband got the Pescados. I plan to use for light/cold champagne pow. But for heavier pow...

Faction Candide 3.0x in 169 (20/21 version): there is a very long thread on skitalk forums devoted to the '21 CTs. They are supposedly amazing at practically everything (a true unicorn ski). Honestly I bought them because they are a steal on Sierra.com and Faction may never make them like this again - supposedly the '21 models are way heavier than any other year and thus exceedingly damp and smooth but also exceedingly maneuverable and fun due to the twin tip and also very good & energetic at carving. Looking forward to trying them this year. If I love them as much as I hope I will, I might also add the '21 CT 1.0 next as there are a bunch still available on skis.com and the-house.com and good sales come around frequently.


I also want to demo some Moment skis this winter! My husband loves his Deathwish 104 and wants me to get a Sierra to match :laughter:.
Nice quiver! I've heard very good things about the Factions. I'd love to demo them! Moments are amazing and the Sierras are fantastic. There is a reason the deathwish basically has a cult following!

Unpopular opinion here, but regarding touring skis...I am a HUGE fan of twin tips in the backcountry, and this is coming from someone who both chases powder, does ski mountaineering, and skis big technical lines in the backcountry. You'll always encounter funky snow at some point in the backcountry and it's nice to have skis that release from turns easily and have good rocker for float. People always say go for traditionally shaped skis, but really the only place they out perform a twin tip ski is in firm couloirs (they'd also be good on open alpine faces in firm snow, but I don't think they significantly out perform the twin tips and the benefits of the twin tips outweigh these discrepancies). Nothing worse than coming across breakable crust (which is not particularly uncommon at some point in your day) and trying to ski it on a traditional and stiff ski. Goodbye knees! Also, don't go too light and stiff. These skis just ding all over the place and it is terrible. I'd highly recommend the Sierra tour for a backcountry ski. They are amazing with float abilities well beyond what you'd expect from that width. They are nimble, nice turning radius, and the triple camber does help on firm surfaces anyway. There is a reason I'm choosing them as a ski mountaineering ski over say a blizzard zero G. If you get the Sierras mount them at -6 (-1 from recommended). I actually really disliked them at -5 but love them at -6! I believe a reviewer at Blister said the same thing (if I remember correctly).

My boyfriend and I both have deathwishes for the resort. Although I made sure to buy mine in the spring before he bought his in the fall so we weren't twinsies with the top sheets haha
 

Elizabeth.I

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Well, my quiver is quite small....

Rossi Hero ST Ti
Nordica Santa Anna 88's.

Rock skis - Rossi Hero ST Ca

At the moment I have no need for anything wider or really any other skis.
Great skis, especially if you're based in the east! Also, it's good you don't spend any extra money on skis you don't need, unlike me! Maybe I'd have more in my retirement savings if I didn't buy skis I don't need.....
 

chasinghorizons

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Nice quiver! I've heard very good things about the Factions. I'd love to demo them! Moments are amazing and the Sierras are fantastic. There is a reason the deathwish basically has a cult following!

Unpopular opinion here, but regarding touring skis...I am a HUGE fan of twin tips in the backcountry, and this is coming from someone who both chases powder, does ski mountaineering, and skis big technical lines in the backcountry. You'll always encounter funky snow at some point in the backcountry and it's nice to have skis that release from turns easily and have good rocker for float. People always say go for traditionally shaped skis, but really the only place they out perform a twin tip ski is in firm couloirs (they'd also be good on open alpine faces in firm snow, but I don't think they significantly out perform the twin tips and the benefits of the twin tips outweigh these discrepancies). Nothing worse than coming across breakable crust (which is not particularly uncommon at some point in your day) and trying to ski it on a traditional and stiff ski. Goodbye knees! Also, don't go too light and stiff. These skis just ding all over the place and it is terrible. I'd highly recommend the Sierra tour for a backcountry ski. They are amazing with float abilities well beyond what you'd expect from that width. They are nimble, nice turning radius, and the triple camber does help on firm surfaces anyway. There is a reason I'm choosing them as a ski mountaineering ski over say a blizzard zero G. If you get the Sierras mount them at -6 (-1 from recommended). I actually really disliked them at -5 but love them at -6! I believe a reviewer at Blister said the same thing (if I remember correctly).

My boyfriend and I both have deathwishes for the resort. Although I made sure to buy mine in the spring before he bought his in the fall so we weren't twinsies with the top sheets haha
Thanks for the advice! I had heard that twin tips are harder on the uphill, so it's good to hear a contrasting opinion! The Sierra Tour or WNDR Vital were my top contenders for getting started with a backcountry ski, but I was a little worried about sliding backwards a lot haha (if only the Sierra Tour graphic was nicer... it's been one of my least favorite graphics for the past two years). I've also been really curious about Faction's new La Machine line of touring skis, but I do worry they might be too light/ding-y like you said. Plus a 4th Faction ski makes me feel like a fangirl... I feel like I need to diversify! Although the Dictator 2 feels like my soulmate ski :laughter:. Have you ever toured with a reverse camber ski? I heard those are more difficult on the uphill too.

I also remember reading that Blister review! I do wish the female reviewers played with mount point more in general. That's something I noticed the male reviewers always do. The Faction Dancer X reviews in particular criticize the ski needing a strong forward stance, but that is seriously mitigated by just moving the mount point forward (even their newschool line is still almost -8 from center!). And if you talk to Faction, they always recommend the progressive line over traditional anyway.
 

Elizabeth.I

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Thanks for the advice! I had heard that twin tips are harder on the uphill, so it's good to hear a contrasting opinion! The Sierra Tour or WNDR Vital were my top contenders for getting started with a backcountry ski, but I was a little worried about sliding backwards a lot haha (if only the Sierra Tour graphic was nicer... it's been one of my least favorite graphics for the past two years). I've also been really curious about Faction's new La Machine line of touring skis, but I do worry they might be too light/ding-y like you said. Plus a 4th Faction ski makes me feel like a fangirl... I feel like I need to diversify! Although the Dictator 2 feels like my soulmate ski :laughter:. Have you ever toured with a reverse camber ski? I heard those are more difficult on the uphill too.

I also remember reading that Blister review! I do wish the female reviewers played with mount point more in general. That's something I noticed the male reviewers always do. The Faction Dancer X reviews in particular criticize the ski needing a strong forward stance, but that is seriously mitigated by just moving the mount point forward (even their newschool line is still almost -8 from center!). And if you talk to Faction, they always recommend the progressive line over traditional anyway.
I find it so funny when people poo-poo certain skis because it's harder to skin on the uphill. Also always the recommendation to go shorter because kick turns are harder on longer skis. Honestly, you get used to what you have. With good technique, which you develop with practice, you can get up anything with any ski. Even on traditional skis, when learning you'll be sliding backwards! There are a few good videos on YouTube talking about skinning technique and with those principles, you can skin on any ski. I have zero trouble with my twin tips on the uphill. My 4frnt ravens are reverse camber and they're fine too. I've taken them on steep skin tracks and super sketchy, exposed side-hilling traverses. As I said, just work on your skinning technique and it's not a big deal. Same thing with ski length. Don't size down, choose the length of skis you want to ski. You'll just get used to kick turning a long ski. Again, just develop good technique! Kick turns on any ski are super hard at the start. Yes, it's not as effortless on longer skis but you get used to it and it's not a big deal!

I find these uphill opinions so interesting because people will compromise on their downhill enjoyment for things that can easily be overcome with skinning practice. I do huge (2000m+) days in the backcountry on all types of snow conditions and manage just fine on all shapes of skis. That being said, for everyone, there are still frustrating moments where you slide backwards but that's just going to happen no matter the ski haha. Even my friend who is a skinning wizard and uses traditional skis slides backwards sometimes on steep tracks!

Also, I'd advise against high traction skins. They are gripper on the uphill but makes sliding your foot forward really tiring. A mohair mix skin is better. Less grippy, but again, you'll just learn to have better technique when skinning. It also saves a ton of energy on long days because you aren't facing a ton of resistance everytime you try to slide your ski forward. I noticed it helped to save my legs and energy levels switching from high traction to mohair mix. That being said, if you don't mind buying a second pair of skins after you use the high traction skins to learn, nothing wrong with that either!
 

fgor

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
My quiver, based mostly at Mt Hutt, New Zealand (sometimes great offpiste but often very icy offpiste and hardpack groomer skiing, low annual snowfall and said to be similar to Eastern NA skiing):

- Augment Performance Carving 70
- Nordica Santa Ana 88 (2021 version)
- Line Pandora 104

Because I'm able to swap skis during the day if I want to, I start almost every day on the Augments, because there's seldom anything worth skiing except groomers until the sun starts softening the offpiste a bit. If it starts getting really choppy or I want to ski some ungroomed stuff I switch to the Santa Anas. The Pandoras are for the occasional powder day and I also pull them out for the very slushy spring days :smile: They get the least use but I'm still happy to have them in my quiver!
 

Elizabeth.I

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
My quiver, based mostly at Mt Hutt, New Zealand (sometimes great offpiste but often very icy offpiste and hardpack groomer skiing, low annual snowfall and said to be similar to Eastern NA skiing):

- Augment Performance Carving 70
- Nordica Santa Ana 88 (2021 version)
- Line Pandora 104

Because I'm able to swap skis during the day if I want to, I start almost every day on the Augments, because there's seldom anything worth skiing except groomers until the sun starts softening the offpiste a bit. If it starts getting really choppy or I want to ski some ungroomed stuff I switch to the Santa Anas. The Pandoras are for the occasional powder day and I also pull them out for the very slushy spring days :smile: They get the least use but I'm still happy to have them in my quiver!
Sounds like a great quiver for your ski hill! My skinny touring skis don't get a lot of love either but it's nice to have them when the appropriate conditions arise! Sounds like at Mt. Hutt it's like canadian spring skiing all season long!
 

scandium

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
My quiver, skiing mostly groomed and sidecountry in the South Island of New Zealand (this year so far has been Hutt, Dobson, Remarks, Coronet) which is like the East Coast of the US, but not as crazy solid as the North Island fields.

- Volkl Flair SC Efficiency 2018 - usually my early season ski and for mornings on the spring. The snow was good enough this year that I haven't been on them yet!
- Volkl Kenja 2019 - my daily driver that charges through everything but does ski me when I'm less confident. Main weak point is the width making them tiring / knee fatigue on cold groomer days, and carrying them uphill SUCKS.
- (occasionally) Volkl Yumi 2019 - technically now mum's, but an easy turning ski and probably my preferred ski for a lazy slushy afternoon.
 

martitheparty

Diva in Training
@martitheparty , ignore my first reply. My second reply is the revised version that makes more sense since I didn't write it when I was tired haha

Also, I meant to say that the wildcat float is noticeably better but not significantly better (if that makes sense) than the deathwish. Also, wildcats are a great tree ski, just not as smeary and quick.
Thank you so much! That's really great intel on the Moments. Now to day dream ("visualize") about all the sweet sweet pow turns to come.
 

kmb5662

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Primarily east coast US skier with a trip or two out west each year.

- Atomic Redster X9 WB - got these last year but they've become more or less my "daily driver" for days at home in the east.

- Blizzard Sheeva 9 - this is my "powder ski" (some may laugh, but works for me lol), bump ski, and tree ski. Not demanding or tiring and handles most conditions well. Always have a blast when I'm on these! As I've taken a lot of lessons over the years and improved my technique I kind of wish I had the next size up as they ski very short, although the length I have is great for in the moguls.

- Blizzard Black Pearl 88 (the '21/22 model) - I demoed these last year and really enjoyed them. Don't get me wrong, I love my Sheevas, but these are a lot less squirrely on the groomers and at higher speeds compared to my Sheevas while still being versatile enough to have a great time in the bumps, trees, and a few inches of soft snow. I just purchased a pair of these on sale and don't have them mounted yet, but planning to take these skis with me when I travel as I find them to be a good well-rounded ski whether conditions are firm and I'm spending a lot of time on groomers or venturing off-piste. If there's a major unexpected dump of snow then I'd likely just rent a wider powder ski or take my Sheevas if the forecast is calling for a lot of snow.

I don't have any plans to buy skis, but you just never know... I really fell in the love with the Volkl Secret 96 last year when I demo'd them but I really don't need them nor have the space. LOL. Would also love to get a pair of XC skis.
 

volklgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
in approximate waist width order:

Volkl Racetiger World Cup 155
Volkl Racetiger SL 165
Volkl Racetiger GS World Cup 180
Atomic Redster X9s 175
Volkl V-Werks Code 175
Fischer Progressor 9+ 165
Fischer Hybrid 8.0 168
Volkl RTM 84 177
Hart Lady Twin 176
Volkl Karma 177
Secret 92 170 with Marker F12
Volkl Mantra M6 170
Volkl Secret 102 with Marker F12
Coalition Snow SoS 173
Volkl Kiku 178 with Marker Duke
Coalition Snow SoS 180
Volkl Shiro 184
Coalition Snow Abyss 180
Volkl Kuro 175

2 prs Canon Snowblades

Volkl Vertigo G20w 178 for retro days

K2 She’s Piste 167 with Rottefella Chilis for Tele

Rossignol BC 65 195 XC
Rossignol Delta skate skis

3 snowboards
 

AJM

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
in approximate waist width order:

Volkl Racetiger World Cup 155
Volkl Racetiger SL 165
Volkl Racetiger GS World Cup 180
Atomic Redster X9s 175
Volkl V-Werks Code 175
Fischer Progressor 9+ 165
Fischer Hybrid 8.0 168
Volkl RTM 84 177
Hart Lady Twin 176
Volkl Karma 177
Secret 92 170 with Marker F12
Volkl Mantra M6 170
Volkl Secret 102 with Marker F12
Coalition Snow SoS 173
Volkl Kiku 178 with Marker Duke
Coalition Snow SoS 180
Volkl Shiro 184
Coalition Snow Abyss 180
Volkl Kuro 175

2 prs Canon Snowblades

Volkl Vertigo G20w 178 for retro days

K2 She’s Piste 167 with Rottefella Chilis for Tele

Rossignol BC 65 195 XC
Rossignol Delta skate skis

3 snowboards
That is one heck of a quiver !!!
 

Mudgirl630

Angel Diva
in approximate waist width order:

Volkl Racetiger World Cup 155
Volkl Racetiger SL 165
Volkl Racetiger GS World Cup 180
Atomic Redster X9s 175
Volkl V-Werks Code 175
Fischer Progressor 9+ 165
Fischer Hybrid 8.0 168
Volkl RTM 84 177
Hart Lady Twin 176
Volkl Karma 177
Secret 92 170 with Marker F12
Volkl Mantra M6 170
Volkl Secret 102 with Marker F12
Coalition Snow SoS 173
Volkl Kiku 178 with Marker Duke
Coalition Snow SoS 180
Volkl Shiro 184
Coalition Snow Abyss 180
Volkl Kuro 175

2 prs Canon Snowblades

Volkl Vertigo G20w 178 for retro days

K2 She’s Piste 167 with Rottefella Chilis for Tele

Rossignol BC 65 195 XC
Rossignol Delta skate skis

3 snowboards
Are some of these skis old?
How do you have this many?
 

Mudgirl630

Angel Diva
Primarily east coast US skier with a trip or two out west each year.

- Atomic Redster X9 WB - got these last year but they've become more or less my "daily driver" for days at home in the east.

- Blizzard Sheeva 9 - this is my "powder ski" (some may laugh, but works for me lol), bump ski, and tree ski. Not demanding or tiring and handles most conditions well. Always have a blast when I'm on these! As I've taken a lot of lessons over the years and improved my technique I kind of wish I had the next size up as they ski very short, although the length I have is great for in the moguls.

- Blizzard Black Pearl 88 (the '21/22 model) - I demoed these last year and really enjoyed them. Don't get me wrong, I love my Sheevas, but these are a lot less squirrely on the groomers and at higher speeds compared to my Sheevas while still being versatile enough to have a great time in the bumps, trees, and a few inches of soft snow. I just purchased a pair of these on sale and don't have them mounted yet, but planning to take these skis with me when I travel as I find them to be a good well-rounded ski whether conditions are firm and I'm spending a lot of time on groomers or venturing off-piste. If there's a major unexpected dump of snow then I'd likely just rent a wider powder ski or take my Sheevas if the forecast is calling for a lot of snow.

I don't have any plans to buy skis, but you just never know... I really fell in the love with the Volkl Secret 96 last year when I demo'd them but I really don't need them nor have the space. LOL. Would also love to get a pair of XC skis.
I love my Atomic X9 wb. They became my daily driver also. I also have two pairs of Kenja, 2020 and 2021. I love them also.
I demoed two models of BP a few years back.
Both times, I could not wait to get off them after 30 ft. Haha.
 

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