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Staying in Ski Shape through summer

#62
I have started a rowing class. I have never gotten into spin classes, every time I tried that it seemed like the most boring thing on the planet, and although rowing is similar, a bunch of people, each on their own rowing machine increasing and decreasing speed by the beat of music, for some reason this does not seem boring at all. It is definitely a competition with myself to increase total number of meters rowed each time I do it. It is a total body workout. I noticed a marked improvement in stamina and strength after just two weeks. Midway during class we are off the machine and doing weight work, then back on the rower. The group I water ski with really notice the difference after just a couple of weeks and I am down 15 lbs just by cutting out sugar and flour and weighing food to become more in touch with my portion sizes. I feel so much better!
 

kiki

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#63
I am still playing golf everyday. Walking 9 holes during the week and riding the cart for 18 holes on weekends. Water aerobics starts next week, twice a week until Sept. then I will switch to pilates reformer until ski season begins in November.
Do you find the golf enough? I too have been golfing but the course i play is very flat. Planning to return to yoga.
 

SkiBam

Angel Diva
#66
I too try to golf 9 holes once a week. (I like to think I get more exercise at this than someone who hits 200 yd drives as I get to do more swings!) It's a decent walk so I'm sure counts for something fitness-wise. Also dragon boating one evening a week, and kayaking (in a race kayak) another evening. And trying to walk as much as possible (except for the past few days when it was over 30 degrees C! (Better today.)
 
#69
That alone sounds like a lot of work
Not nearly as much work as I thought. It is called Bright Lines Eating. The theory is that flour and sugar are very addictive, and after a few days of not eating them, I really wasn’t missing them. The other lines that you don’t cross are 3 meals per day and nothing in between. And weighing/ measuring your food. I was quite successful with weight watchers many years ago when the program was much stricter than it is today, and the more lenient it became with “free” foods, the less it worked for me. When I tried to eat 5 or 6 small meals, I found I was never really satisfied, and I thought about food all day long. Three meals per day hooked me and the rest just fell into place. To me the hard part is when I work late, and really don’t feel like cooking, there is no just stopping by the local pizza place and picking up a couple of slices. But there are ways around that...take out sushi, couscous takes almost no time or effort, and a stop at the salad bar gives me grilled chicken and a variety of veggies to make the meal.
 
#70
Love couscous, always in my pantry as a quick fix any season. That and cans of black beans and chick peas. Take a can of black beans, slice an avocado, some cherry tomatoes and frozen corn and that’s a summer dinner around here. But couscous is semolina- is only processed flour out? I also did well on WW at one point — a few plans ago. Not so much since then.
 
#71
Love couscous, always in my pantry as a quick fix any season. That and cans of black beans and chick peas. Take a can of black beans, slice an avocado, some cherry tomatoes and frozen corn and that’s a summer dinner around here. But couscous is semolina- is only processed flour out? I also did well on WW at one point — a few plans ago. Not so much since then.
Couscous or quinoa, sautéd onion and garlic, artichoke hearts and beans (Black, cannelloni, red or chick peas) are my go to. Yes only processed flour. And as far as sugar, artificial sweeteners, honey, agave etc all are forbidden.
 

Susan L

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#72
Do you find the golf enough? I too have been golfing but the course i play is very flat. Planning to return to yoga.
My home course has 27 holes and is definitely not flat. I’d say for each 9, 5 holes are uphill climbs. All the greens are raised and using a push cart adds extra work. It is about a 3.5mile walk and I usually finish 9 in less than 90 minutes. I think it is enough exercise for me...I tried yoga too but I tend to get bored and fall asleep zzzz. I enjoy pilates more because it seems more “physical”. I Zumba and Barre too if I can fit them in my schedule.
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
#73
I tried yoga too but I tend to get bored and fall asleep zzzz. I enjoy pilates more because it seems more “physical”. I Zumba and Barre too if I can fit them in my schedule.
I also much prefer pilates over yoga.

What do you do for balance? Or does Barre cover that aspect of ski fitness? For me, I find that if I do something related to 1-leg balance every day, then it's much more effective in the long run. Doesn't need to be for very long. Even a few minutes standing on one leg a couple times a day makes a difference.
 

Susan L

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#75
I also much prefer pilates over yoga.

What do you do for balance? Or does Barre cover that aspect of ski fitness? For me, I find that if I do something related to 1-leg balance every day, then it's much more effective in the long run. Doesn't need to be for very long. Even a few minutes standing on one leg a couple times a day makes a difference.
Barre definitely helps with balance and strengthens calves and quads. Golf actually requires core and lower body strength for balance and power so I get that covered in my daily routine too!
 
#76
I have started a rowing class. I have never gotten into spin classes, every time I tried that it seemed like the most boring thing on the planet, and although rowing is similar, a bunch of people, each on their own rowing machine increasing and decreasing speed by the beat of music, for some reason this does not seem boring at all. It is definitely a competition with myself to increase total number of meters rowed each time I do it. It is a total body workout. I noticed a marked improvement in stamina and strength after just two weeks. Midway during class we are off the machine and doing weight work, then back on the rower.
This sounds awesome! I have used a rowing machine in a previous HIIT class I used to do that had it at one of the stations. I've never seen it as a full class though, my gym definitely doesn't have it..


I also much prefer pilates over yoga.
What do you do for balance? Or does Barre cover that aspect of ski fitness? For me, I find that if I do something related to 1-leg balance every day, then it's much more effective in the long run. Doesn't need to be for very long. Even a few minutes standing on one leg a couple times a day makes a difference.
Years ago I tried yoga and couldn't stand it, however in the past say 4 or 5 years I have taken it up with much more enthusiasm. For me it's taken some trial and error with the types of yoga I like and finding really great instructors versus really monotonous boring ones. I don't like the restorative slow types of classes, and luckily my gym has some fantastic options available with classes and instructors that make the classes physically challenging and mentally stimulating at the same time. I also LOVE outdoor classes in the summer and frequent an early morning one in a park on the water on Fridays when the weather allows. This past weekend I also had the immense pleasure of doing my first class at the top of Stratton mountain on a huge freestanding deck you ride the gondola up to, it was pure heaven!
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
#77
Barre definitely helps with balance and strengthens calves and quads.
Looks like there are Barre routines that are good for hamstrings too. Don't look too much different than the usual exercises, but I can see why Barre can be appealing. I did a fair amount of ballet before middle school so it seems pretty familiar.


Video on this webpage is using a chair, up on toes the entire time!
https://www.canadianliving.com/section/video/3878687081001
 
#78
have started a rowing class.
I signed up for sculling this summer. I like it a lot, lots of leg work. We practice on the Potomac river, with view of National Monument and Capital Hill as backdrop, can't get better than that. I kicked myself why I waited this long to start, since the boathouse is only 1 mile from my home.
When the weather is bad (e.g. thunderstorm / lightening, water is rough), we practice on the rowing machine indoor. My only complain: I picked another sport that's weather dependent !!!:frown: Our 3-week introductory session, we spent ~50% class time indoor due to bad weather.

I continue to do the Indoor carpet skiing with my Liberty instructor, I signed up for 12 sessions this time. As I find it very helpful to work on the techniques to ski on carpet, it pays off when I am skiing on real snow. My another classmate thought the same and she is doing the lessons with me again this year.
 
#79
For anyone wondering how their current fitness matches up with ski fitness, Bumps for Boomers has a self-test that's pretty straightforward to do at home. Takes 15-20 minutes. Helps to watch the entire video first before actually doing the test.

I found the Bumps for Boomers series of fitness videos towards the end of doing knee rehab. Was a good way to get started with ski conditioning before I found a personal trainer and started learning what worked best for me physically as well as what would keep me interested.

https://www.bumpsforboomers.com/ski-fitness/self-test-fitness-screening/
 

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