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Standing still...

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
#22
Smatty - try standing in boots like you would be if you were bouncing ball. Or if you play tennis - ready position. This is what SkiSailor is saying about your shoulders.

Also check for that spoiler. Also check and see if there is one in the tongue.
 

Smatty

Diva in Training
#23
No spoilers front or back; I’m definitely leaning into the tongue. That has been my way of trying to compensate for my upright torso, as I’m trying to put at least some of my weight on the gear.

Ready- position makes sense. That might also explain why I’m fine when actually skiing, but not on flat roads. To me it always looks like people are “standing up” when on cat tracks
 
#24
Okay, after a couple of long shifts, I present you: me standing in boots. Two different stances, both cause thigh burn, even standing there indoors. I can squat over 200#, strength better not be the issue.
@snoWYmonkey , I would really appreciate your, and of course anyone else’s input. Gotta figure this out. This is my year
You should be able to stand around and be on flat cat tracks without having your thighs constantly burn. It sounds like your feet might be causing part of the issue if you currently don't have supportive insoles. I would suspect when you're sqatting you have some type of supportive shoe that helps prevent your arches from collapsing.

My guess would be:
a) New supportive footbeds will solve most of your problems
b) Your boots have too much forward lean for your body's geometry.
c) Your boots have too much ramp angle for your body's geometries.

B or C would pitch your center of gravity forward, and your thighs are constantly working trying to bring you back to neutral. Working with a good boot fitter you should be able to dial in a, b and c.

But if you want to try some experimentation... try putting a magazine under your toes...how does that feel? Better/worse? Try different heights under your toes, find what feels best. Now with what feels best just "standing around", get into your ready position...does it still feel balanced? The downside of this is you are effectively changing your forward lean and your ramp angle together, so you can't get them dialed in separately.
 

BMR

Certified Ski Diva
#25
Interesting... I thought I was the only one. I hate cat tracks, especially long ones. I can never quite figure out whether to straghtline them or make little turns. It feels weirdly uncomfortable to just sled down, but turns can sometimes slow you down too much or cut off crazy banshees zipping by on all sides. I much prefer runs with actual pitch. And yes, my legs can feel like I am in a barre class.
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
#26
Can you post a pic of the back of that boot? You don't need to be in it. I want to see what all that stuff is on the spine. That's a K2 boot?
 
#28
Ready- position makes sense. That might also explain why I’m fine when actually skiing, but not on flat roads. To me it always looks like people are “standing up” when on cat tracks
Interesting... I thought I was the only one. I hate cat tracks, especially long ones. I can never quite figure out whether to straghtline them or make little turns. It feels weirdly uncomfortable to just sled down, but turns can sometimes slow you down too much or cut off crazy banshees zipping by on all sides. I much prefer runs with actual pitch. And yes, my legs can feel like I am in a barre class.
Yep, most people stand up and aren't in the best stance when cruising down cat tracks. During my first few lessons with very experienced instructors out west, I was shown ways to use cat tracks to practice proper stance. First lesson at Alta, my instructor told me to do the drill he showed me all the time on groomers for the rest of the day, especially on the long cat track called Collins Return. Feels a little silly at first, but makes a difference in the long run. If you look, most people on cat tracks don't have their hands and arms in optimal positions. It's not necessary but practicing good form there helps a great deal when on more challenging terrain, whether that is a steeper blue or a black with bumps and/or trees. More likely to move "down the hill" instead of into the backseat after developing good habits on easy terrain.

On flat cat tracks, learning how to do "railroad tracks" properly is very useful. Harder than it looks when an instructor demonstrates. I wasn't doing it correctly for a couple seasons after my local coach first started me on the idea. (Home mountain has less than 100 acres, 100% manmade snow, no off-piste terrain.)
 
#29
No spoilers front or back; I’m definitely leaning into the tongue. That has been my way of trying to compensate for my upright torso, as I’m trying to put at least some of my weight on the gear.

Ready- position makes sense. That might also explain why I’m fine when actually skiing, but not on flat roads. To me it always looks like people are “standing up” when on cat tracks
Leaning on the tongue with an upright torso is precisely the problem. We shouldn’t lean on the equipment. Stand on your feet and back your shin off a bit. Then bring shoulders forward a bit.

People ARE always standing up on cat tracks. AND standing up when they ski downhill as well. It’s a recipe for having to hit the bar at 1:30 because your legs are tired . . .
 

Smatty

Diva in Training
#31
Another day, another photoshoot:
Orange buckles: dynafit hoji, at boots. Silver buckles: lange rx downhill boot

I tried different stances, with and without magazine, same instant thigh burn.
I also tried to not lean on my tongue; If I do, I really bend the boot. 8B3B180C-3AD9-4283-AF29-E2D7225B1E27.jpeg 090CA2DF-76B9-40A2-9943-D4F9E50C5C87.jpeg E2707F91-4EE0-4F54-AB53-F0F952392CA7.jpeg
 
#33
Another day, another photoshoot:
Orange buckles: dynafit hoji, at boots. Silver buckles: lange rx downhill boot

I tried different stances, with and without magazine, same instant thigh burn.
I also tried to not lean on my tongue; If I do, I really bend the boot. View attachment 12271 View attachment 12272 View attachment 12273
Great pics. It just looks like you have too much knee bend (relative to ankle flex) - see how far back your hips are? That’s like a mini partial wall squat. I know I wouldn’t last half a run in that position without thigh burn.

Stand taller in your legs - by bending your knees less. NOT by straightening your spine and moving your shoulders back.
 

snoWYmonkey

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#35
Sorry, late to reply. I agree with skisailor and all the previous comments. Thanks for all the photos. Do you get the burn when standing in the go ski position with bare feet? What about bare feet with a wedge under heels? Just continuing to explore cause and effect.
 
#36
Sorry, late to reply. I agree with skisailor and all the previous comments. Thanks for all the photos. Do you get the burn when standing in the go ski position with bare feet? What about bare feet with a wedge under heels? Just continuing to explore cause and effect.

. . . . or a wedge under the forefoot (a gas pedal). This is something you could experiment with in front of the mirror. (Try putting small wedges under you boot heels, then under the front of your boots and see which one feels better and how it looks in the mirror). IMHO, a "gas pedal" would be more likely to help you bring your hips forward over your feet.
 

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