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So what do you think of the plan to make Daylight Savings Time permanent?

snoWYmonkey

Angel Diva
As a morning person who functions well in the early daytime darkness but falls apart as soon as the sun sets, it would be fun to hear the type of person that favors lught in the morning. Do night owls prefer bright mornings to getvthem going? The same way this early bird prefers bright evenings? Genuinely curious if that impacts our personal preferences.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Apparently, healthwise, permanent DST would be bad for us. And while I'm not a fan of 4:17 sunsets (our earliest), I think I'm even less of a fan if 9 am sunrises.

Same. I can tolerate the sun going down early in the winter because I'm not outside except for skiing anyway. But not being able to ski until 10 a.m.? No thanks! I'd be on the hill sliding at 8 if I could!
 

shadoj

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
My body runs by the sun, so I don't really care what the clocks say, as long as I get my ~2hrs of daylight before I'm forced to do anything in an alert manner. Just depends on whether or not I can find a job with flexible start times. Currently do contract work from home in the winter, hourly in the summer. Would be extremely difficult to go back to a job/school that makes me arrive & leave when it's dark (SAD). Much more productive in the long MN summers (5:23am to 9:02pm longest day, vs. 7:44am to 4:35pm shortest).
 

Christy

Angel Diva
Do night owls prefer bright mornings to getvthem going?
Yes. It is SO hard to get up in the dark in any case, and the idea of getting up in the dark and no light for hours...Sunrise at 9 is a very unpleasant thought. I'm honestly shocked that one of WA's senators sponsored the bill.

What time would our ski areas start in that case? 10?

The issue of kids walking to school in the dark (yes kids walk here in the city) or standing on street corners in the dark waiting for the bus...That just sucks. It's not safe.
 

Abbi

Angel Diva
My choices on time are pretty much seasonal. In the winter when I ski I would rather be on standard time so it gets late earlier. I don’t mind it getting dark at 5 o’clock or earlier. As a aging skier I don’t stay out all day anyway! However since I sail in the summer I like the days as long as possible at the end of the day when I can get people who have to work to come sail and race with me. :noidea:
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
I guess as someone who regularly gets up to do things well before sunrise with no alarm, and who in summer, when the sun sets late, will go to sleep before sunset... I'm just not buying that it would have any affect on my sleep. But maybe I'm just weird.

The part i don't like is, as someone else stated, 'losing my competitive advantage' as a natural early riser. LOL.
 

mustski

Angel Diva
I suspect that kids walking in the dark is more high schoolers than youngsters. Even at school bus stops, I always see at least one adult waiting with the littles. It's kind of irrelevant though ... adults can be hit by a car in the dark as easily as kids, particularly when they are stupid enough to dress all in black.

Humans are pretty adaptable though. I think it will work out either way it goes.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I guess as someone who regularly gets up to do things well before sunrise with no alarm, and who in summer, when the sun sets late, will go to sleep before sunset... I'm just not buying that it would have any affect on my sleep. But maybe I'm just weird.

The part i don't like is, as someone else stated, 'losing my competitive advantage' as a natural early riser. LOL.
Yes, this!
Honestly, it seems that what maybe needs to happen is a rethinking of time zones. The locations on the western edges and northern edges of time zones will be impacted harshly in the winter with stupid late sunrises. Utah is one of those, and the ski resorts here are not particularly happy about it and have been pushing their representatives to not approve this.

I already struggle with the late sunrises in winter, whereas the early sunsets to me are just a temporary part of winter, where we're inside anyway.

Frankly, I'm fine with continuing with the change of the clocks twice per year. We have so many other pressing issues, and this is one that doesn't rank high on my list of big ones.
 

RachelV

Administrator
Staff member
...

I already struggle with the late sunrises in winter, whereas the early sunsets to me are just a temporary part of winter, where we're inside anyway.

Frankly, I'm fine with continuing with the change of the clocks twice per year. We have so many other pressing issues, and this is one that doesn't rank high on my list of big ones.

Totally, but - you don't really have particularly early sunsets, as someone who lives on the western side of a timezone. Looks like your earliest sunset in 2021 was 4:59pm. Compare that to someone in Boston, where the sun set at 4:11pm.

Conversely, you'd be really screwed on the sunrise front with this change, with your latest sunrise getting to a time that feels too late, whereas places like Boston would have sunrises that just feel a little late.

To me, that's what this change would do, in an overly-simplified nutshell: shift the suckiness burden during the shortest days from people that live on the eastern sides of timezones to people that live on the western sides of timezones.

All that said, I also think we should just keep changing the clocks. :smile:
 
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mustski

Angel Diva
Currently, both AZ and HI stay with standard time throughout the year. I believe each state can make it's own decision so as to best serve it's residents. I am in the early bird camp, but I can live with it either way. For me, I just need my sunshine or I become grumpy!
 

Eera

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Maybe not quite relevant as not in the US, but from another perspective. I live in the tropics in a state that doesn't have daylight saving, so in summer it's broad daylight at 4.30 in the morning and dark by 6.30 at night. I'd love it if they introduced daylight saving which would pull Queensland into line with the rest of the Eastern states and gave us some light at the end of the day.
There's multiple arguments either way, one of the largest is "why don't you all get up an hour earlier?", well, because businesses and schools and everything else aren't starting an hour earlier.
 

Christy

Angel Diva
Maybe not quite relevant as not in the US, but from another perspective. I live in the tropics in a state that doesn't have daylight saving, so in summer it's broad daylight at 4.30 in the morning and dark by 6.30 at night. I'd love it if they introduced daylight saving which would pull Queensland into line with the rest of the Eastern states and gave us some light at the end of the day.

Oh, interesting! A few years ago we went to Japan in early May and I didn't know they didn't do daylight savings--I'd never thought about if countries did or didn't, and I hadn't ever encountered surprises in Europe when I traveled. The first day I was VERY confused as to why, in May, it was getting dark at 6 (technically sunset was around 6:30 but it was pouring and the skies were dark before sunset). I remember riding the train from the airport and thinking, what is going on???
 

Scribble

Angel Diva
I start work at 6am and permanent daylight time would make for long, dark mornings in the winter.
An advantage would be having an extra hour of daylight to go "night" skiing. In the spring, I can get away for 3 hours after work and still be home before dark.
Its a nice perk for a few weeks, but its too easy for me to stay up late and wake up groggy the next day. Standard time is a lot easier to live in.
 

SkiBam

Angel Diva
But standard time year round would mean daylight where I live at 4 a.m. in summer (maybe earlier, not sure). To me, that's a total waste of daylight. Much rather have it in the evening. Maybe after all this, it's best to keep the time changes (unpleasant as they are).
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
I don’t really care either way personally..

That being said, I’m a night owl and would much prefer later sunsets to earlier sunrises. I think it’s “cozy” to wake up when it’s still dark, and now that I work from home it doesn't bother me at all when it’s dark in the morning. If I were still driving to work I did find it easier to “wake up” on my long commute in when it was lighter in the morning.

I’d love a little later start in the morning for ski days in particular though. I’m not a morning person, but I try and be out by 8am first chair which has me getting up earlier than weekdays all winter long so I can have a nice breakfast and do some yoga etc. ahead of time. Another hour to snooze would be greatly appreciated. It gets dark so early in ME during the really short days in the winter, it’d be lovely to have later sunsets as well.
 

MaineSkiLady

Angel Diva
It gets dark so early in ME during the really short days in the winter, it’d be lovely to have later sunsets as well.
Longitudinally, Maine is in the Atlantic Time Zone. Endless conversations and debates have happened over the years about the state switching to Atlantic time, always with defeat due to the obvious disruptions that this change would make in commerce, travel, etc.

As a result, Maine, unlike its neighbors Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, is an hour earlier. Depending on elevation (mountains obscure sunsets), winter solstice sunset is at/around 3:30 p.m., with total darkness just after 4. Conversely, summer solstice means 4:00 a.m. broad daylight, with sunrise before 4.

Anyone who lives in or near terrain will see an even earlier sunset in winter. Once the sun goes behind the mountain(s), it is locally considered “set.”

The far eastern portions of any time zone will benefit from DST. The western portions will not.
 

TrixieRuby

Diva in Training
I hope decisions are made in favor of having light in the morning--sunrise at 8-9 am sounds like a recipe for Seasonal Affective Disorder, children going to school in the dark, (as a Bostonian, my kids stood at the bus stop at 7:00 am in the dark in December, really, with standard time) more accidents, and challenges for farmers. No one talks about a 1/2 hour time shift--why not? Split the difference between DST and Standard time, and then just rename the time so as to match up with International time. I don't mind changing time--only the spring change is difficult, the fall one is easy!
 

SallyCat

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I suspect that kids walking in the dark is more high schoolers than youngsters. Even at school bus stops, I always see at least one adult waiting with the littles. It's kind of irrelevant though ... adults can be hit by a car in the dark as easily as kids, particularly when they are stupid enough to dress all in black.

Humans are pretty adaptable though. I think it will work out either way it goes.

It could, though, be an opportunity for s positive change for schools that could also solve the traffic-in-the-dark issue.
Permanent DST would allow schools to start later in the morning because it would allow sports to go later in the afternoon.
It's fairly accepted science (afaik/understand it) that pushing school start times back an hour or two has very positive health and learning benefits for kids; especially teenagers. But after-school sports schedules are often the reason start times have to remain early--so outdoor games have enough daylight.
 

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