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So I'm afraid of hills...

AliceH

<span style="color:#F89F07";">Angel Diva</span>
#41
gardenmary, I'm both shorter and larger than you - and that's after moving my set point down 12 pounds over the past year. srsly, I rarely see anyone larger than me skiing. I'm not quite a bowling ball, but I weigh more than I look like I weigh - I exercise regularly, including doing strength training/PT for a bad knee, and it ends up making me look deceptively smaller than my numbers.
 

whitewater girl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#42
hmmm, how about 5' 4" and 210-220 when I started? (at 41 yrs of age)...And I began on 140 cm Rossignol Bandits...

(btw, am much, much smaller now, though like you, I'm strong & still do weigh more than I look..skiing actually was a big part of that weight loss...)
 

AliceH

<span style="color:#F89F07";">Angel Diva</span>
#43
a bit taller, still larger - but I'm not going to play the guessing game any more, LOL.

The really unfortunate thing is, if I exercise vigorously, I just get bigger. Between the birth of my daughter and my son I hired a personal trainer for a month, went to the gym four times a week and did cardio 40 minutes both on gym days and non gym days, strength trained on gym days to the point where I was more sore than I'd ever been and stretched on my off days as much as I could just to get to the point where I could crawl back in to the gym the next day. That combined with a 1500-calorie-a-day diet (I just can't go any lower when I'm exercising regularly, everything starts looking like a cupcake including my kids' heads :drool: ) and limiting my fat to 20 grams a day, gave me a 3-pound weight gain. :eek: My personal trainer insisted that I was obviously eating 3,000 calories or more a day.

I've gotten myself on a food routine that's managed to bring where I hover down 12 pounds in the last year, and as long as I feel strong enough to do the activities I want to do and I'm not having to buy larger clothes, I'm pretty OK with my body size. Really, the only frustration I have with my weight on a personal level (outside of things like people making snap judgments) is that it's really hard on my knees. I climbed a 14er almost 4 years ago, and I'd like to take my kids up a short one this year, but this darned knee has me concerned that if something happened I wouldn't be able to carry them both down and I don't like to take them places where I can't put one on my back and one on my front and get them out of whatever situation I've gotten us in to. We were on track to do it last year (we were hoping to hit Mt Democrat and maybe combo with Cameron) but the hiking season ended up with us all getting bad colds one after another and it killed the last four possible weeks.

Playing the numbers game gets to be very dangerous for me, though - especially since a certain time of the month is an automatic 5 pound gain within a day. At a time when I want a pint of ice cream, no less. I have a scale, but I've learned to listen to the beeps and just look at which direction my body fat's moving in, and I only check my actual weight about once a month to make sure my set point's moving downward.
 

bounceswoosh

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#44
The really unfortunate thing is, if I exercise vigorously, I just get bigger. Between the birth of my daughter and my son I hired a personal trainer for a month, went to the gym four times a week and did cardio 40 minutes both on gym days and non gym days, strength trained on gym days to the point where I was more sore than I'd ever been and stretched on my off days as much as I could just to get to the point where I could crawl back in to the gym the next day. That combined with a 1500-calorie-a-day diet (I just can't go any lower when I'm exercising regularly, everything starts looking like a cupcake including my kids' heads :drool: ) and limiting my fat to 20 grams a day, gave me a 3-pound weight gain. :eek: My personal trainer insisted that I was obviously eating 3,000 calories or more a day.
This sets off warning bells to me - working out aggressively, eating 1500 calories a day, and limiting to 20g of fat?? That sounds like a recipe for disaster.

A few summers ago, I rode my bike every day, and also aggressively cut fat. I think the math in the book I read worked out to 40g, maybe 35g, but of course I was going to do it "better". Also 20-25g of fat. I ended up getting sick a lot, losing all my energy, and of course some chronic ailments.

Our bodies need fat, and more specifically, our brains need fat. And calories, too. Weight could be fat or muscle, so if you're increasing your exercise levels, there's every reason to think your weight gain was muscle. Which is *good*.

A lot of times, when I start working out harder, I gain weight before I lose it. That's just how my body does things - build up muscle, then slowly (if ever) drop the fat.

Sorry - don't mean to rant at you. I'm no expert, but I've read a lot on nutrition, and that game plan sounds flawed to me. Flawed in a way that I personally have experienced and would not recommend.
 

AliceH

<span style="color:#F89F07";">Angel Diva</span>
#45
It definitely wasn't good for me, but the personal trainer was very insistent that this was *the* way to go, and I was desperate in a way that I no longer allow myself to get. (That was six years ago.) And it's not the craziest thing I tried before I just realized that there's not a solution for me that's even close to what common nutritional education is regarding calorie intake and weight. The literature and calculators and doctors say I must be eating at least 5-700 calories a day more than I am, with a sedentary lifestyle, to be maintaining my weight, but spot journaling (a week here and there, with careful consideration toward taking mental notes when I'm eating weird things on non-journal weeks so I'm not letting a stolen chicken nugget here or a piece of buttered bread there derail me) indicates I'm nowhere close to that.

The only time my metabolism has approached doing what 'normal' people's does is when I'm breastfeeding. I swear, if I get pregnant again, the kid's going to be able to chew steak before he's gonna stop nursing!

I've been contemplating going to an endocrinologist for quite a while, I'm thinking it's probably time - I've eliminated just about everything that could be contributing to metabolism problems, with the exception of not wearing my CPAP as regularly as I should. My doc is very helpful, but I'm sure that a GP can't keep up on all the endocrine stuff that a specialist does.
 

Serafina

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#46
+1 on the endocrinologist and +1 on the CPAP.

If you need a CPAP and don't use it, your sleep is getting disrupted, and there are quite a few studies linking poor sleep with weight gain.

And it's time to get your thyroid checked out, by someone who knows what s/he is doing. The simple test that you're getting done (if you are) with your annual physical may not be sufficient to identify a thyroid problem (and those will DEFINITELY mess with your weight).

There also seems to be mounting evidence that weight is programmed genetically, and that efforts to change that programmed set point do not have a good success rate...that people can do this for the short term, but the body forces the issue in the long term. Could be genes for you, in which case you just have to focus on staying healthy & not worry about weight, but I would really suggest attending to the CPAP and getting checked out by an endocrinologist before arriving at that conclusion - especially since it's causing problems for your knees and going to interfere with your ability to stay active.

Best of luck, and enjoy the new skis!!
 

gardenmary

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#47
+1 on the endocrinologist and +1 on the CPAP.

If you need a CPAP and don't use it, your sleep is getting disrupted, and there are quite a few studies linking poor sleep with weight gain.

And it's time to get your thyroid checked out, by someone who knows what s/he is doing. The simple test that you're getting done (if you are) with your annual physical may not be sufficient to identify a thyroid problem (and those will DEFINITELY mess with your weight).

There also seems to be mounting evidence that weight is programmed genetically, and that efforts to change that programmed set point do not have a good success rate...that people can do this for the short term, but the body forces the issue in the long term. Could be genes for you, in which case you just have to focus on staying healthy & not worry about weight, but I would really suggest attending to the CPAP and getting checked out by an endocrinologist before arriving at that conclusion - especially since it's causing problems for your knees and going to interfere with your ability to stay active.

Best of luck, and enjoy the new skis!!
Strongly agree with Serafina. I am German/Scandinavian in ancestry, and apparently have a much stronger German gene than Norse. I am concentrating on being healthy. I once told my doctor I thought I was supposed to weigh 125, and he looked at me and said, if you weigh 125 you'll probably be in the hospital, if not dead. Then a friend's daughter told me what she weighed - at 5'5" she weighed 162 - and she looked AWESOME. Not skinny, but healthy.

And I'll never as long as I live forget the older German gentleman who came up to me long ago when I worked retail in a shop along the San Diego waterfront - he said he was SO GLAD to finally see an American woman with some meat on her bones. "These girls, they look like they would fall over in the slightest breeze. You at least look healthy!" It really opened my eyes.

If you get on the right skis, no matter what your body type, you'll have a much easier time of it - and it will be a lot of fun!
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#48
I will second that most "trainers" that you find at gyms and stuff have thoroughly idiotic ideas.

Last time I met with one he wanted me to be on an under 1200 calorie per day diet, minimal fat (totally agree that's about the worst idea ever), lots of exercise. When I count calories, I lose weight at 1900-2100 calories a day with just moderate exercise - 1200 would absolutely destroy my metabolism. If I paid any attention to that guy, I'd have been a mess. Even stupider, he used one of those little machines that's supposed to calculate out your metabolism and tell you how many calories you need per day- - guess what it came up with? about 2000. He said that was ridiculous, I'm a woman, so I need 1200 or less. Ugh. Idiots.
 

Serafina

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#49
Strongly agree with Serafina. I am German/Scandinavian in ancestry, and apparently have a much stronger German gene than Norse. I am concentrating on being healthy. I once told my doctor I thought I was supposed to weigh 125, and he looked at me and said, if you weigh 125 you'll probably be in the hospital, if not dead. Then a friend's daughter told me what she weighed - at 5'5" she weighed 162 - and she looked AWESOME. Not skinny, but healthy.
Quite true. I am 5'10" and currently about 190, which is about 15 lbs more than I wish to weigh. The year I finished my dissertation and got divorced, I was down to 160, and you could count every bone in my body at that weight. People kept asking me if I'd been ill. And even at that weight - where my collarbones, ribs, and spine were sticking out, I still wore a size 14.

Not everyone is going to be, or needs to be, a size 6!

FWIW, I ride 160s happily right now, but the skis I learned on were quite a bit shorter than that. I asked about their size at the ski school rental at one point (in the context of a conversation about acquiring my own gear) and the woman there just looked shocked and said she would NEVER recommend that I stay on this ski - it was only for learning how to turn and stop, and that she'd put me on anything from a 160-170. I think, technically, my Tierras are 161. It may be a smallish ski for my size, but I can flex it and turn it, and I enjoy them. Very likely once (if!) I get a lot better I will wish to ride a longer ski, but for now, this one works very well.
 

vickie

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#50
hmmm, how about 5' 4" and 210-220 when I started? (at 41 yrs of age)...And I began on 140 cm Rossignol Bandits...
a bit taller, still larger
AliceH -- based on this, you're 5'5" or taller. The 156 should be fine for you. I am 5'2" and normally ski on 152s. I demo'd the Lotta Luv in a 156 and it wasn't too long. I also demo'd the Free Luv in a 156 and it felt short.

Beginner skis help you learn. I think you're going to be so happy when you get out there and feel you have control of the skis! We want to hear about it!
 

whitewater girl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#51
yeah, I've gained weight on extreme diet/exercise programs where it "should" have been impossible (my ex-husband was sure I was sneaking food at work - co-workers swore I had to be pigging out at home :bag:)...as other's have said, it made a total mess of my metabolism (not to mention my self-esteme)...

..I've lost alot of weight since I started skiing, but I'm never going to be thin...I wasn't feeling healthy at the weight I was at; I'm now at a weight were I feel good...you need to be at the weight that's right for you, not what some formula (or worse, hollywood) says you should weigh....

oh, and make that another +1 on the endocrinologist and CPAP. You need to stay healthy for those little one's of yours...
 

AliceH

<span style="color:#F89F07";">Angel Diva</span>
#52
We're on top of my thyroid, I get TSH checked at least twice a year, with a full workup (free T3/T4, etc) at my annual physical. My doctor is actually pretty awesome, she picked up on my thyroid problem almost immediately that had gone undiagnosed through several different doctors (including two doctors that were insistent that although I had subclinical hypothyroidism, it certainly wasn't enough to treat). We've been very lucky with our doctors over the past several years.

It sounds like some of you have CPAP experience (and boy, have we gotten a ways from skiing, haven't we?) - does anyone else break out with acne around their mask, and how do you deal with it? I wash mine with Ivory, and wash my face before bed and when I get up, but I still periodically get a breakout that makes me not want to wear it for weeks. I tried the intracannular mask but just couldn't deal with it.
 

T

Certified Ski Diva
#53
I was 13 years old the first time that I skied. I took a weeks worth of lessons and haven't skied since until 2 years ago. I started snowboarding in my mid thirties with my preteen boys so that I could join them on the mountain until I had an accident and broke a couple of bones on a Black Diamond run at Lake Louise. I absolutely adored to board, but because of my fear of another injury I have not been on a board since. I met a wonderful man 2 years ago who is a phenomenal skier and has successfully got me back on the hill, but skiing now. Every run is a course in me pushing my limits because I want to get better and be able to keep up with him. I have to really push myself and overcome my fear of wiping out. It sounds silly, but I talk to myself on the way down....I remember what I have been taught and run it through my head each and every run. I spend a good portion of my day honing my skills. All I can offer you is for starters you are NOT too old, (I took skiing up again at age 41) continue to practice and take lessons, workshops etc. and most importantly ensure that your equipment is conducive to your level and ability.

As was said previously by another poster...the important thing is that you ARE skiing....enjoy yourself!:yahoo:
 

whitewater girl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#54
It sounds like some of you have CPAP experience (and boy, have we gotten a ways from skiing, haven't we?) - does anyone else break out with acne around their mask, and how do you deal with it? I wash mine with Ivory, and wash my face before bed and when I get up, but I still periodically get a breakout that makes me not want to wear it for weeks. I tried the intracannular mask but just couldn't deal with it.
no personal experience, but have several friends with apnea...my first though is to try different soaps/solutions for cleaning (I've had both a doctor & one of P&G's own researchers tell me Ivory is horrible for your skin...and I have very sensitive skin, so...)...hmmm, a quick search came up with this: http://www.cpap.com/productpage/remzzzs-full-face-cpap-mask-liners.html (probably not news, but in case you haven't come across them...site has some other options for skin problems as well and a large variety of mask styles)

If you find you simply can't tolerate the mask, do you know if sleeping on your side would help? There are a wide variety of pillows/supports (for body/hips/knees/back as well as head & neck) to help one sleep on their side comfortably & without strain...
 

AliceH

<span style="color:#F89F07";">Angel Diva</span>
#55
Sleeping on my side is how I usually sleep. It doesn't help with apnea, it just relieves snoring sometimes. My nighttime awakenings weren't any fewer when I was lying on my side during my sleep study.
 

Robyn

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#56
We're on top of my thyroid, I get TSH checked at least twice a year, with a full workup (free T3/T4, etc) at my annual physical. My doctor is actually pretty awesome, she picked up on my thyroid problem almost immediately that had gone undiagnosed through several different doctors (including two doctors that were insistent that although I had subclinical hypothyroidism, it certainly wasn't enough to treat). We've been very lucky with our doctors over the past several years.

It sounds like some of you have CPAP experience (and boy, have we gotten a ways from skiing, haven't we?) - does anyone else break out with acne around their mask, and how do you deal with it? I wash mine with Ivory, and wash my face before bed and when I get up, but I still periodically get a breakout that makes me not want to wear it for weeks. I tried the intracannular mask but just couldn't deal with it.
Wanna share your doctor's name? For years I've believed I'm in that sub-clinical thyroid category but haven't gotten a doctor willing to treat because the tests show I'm not even though I've exhibited a majority of the major symptoms.
 

CarbFrenzy

Diva in Training
#57
Dear Alice, I am no expert in either skiing or diet and exersizing but here are few things that helped me a LOT. I took few group lessons but they really didn't do much for me, I was wedging like crazy and going down the greens was a huge deal, I was so frustrated and embarassed. So few years ago I decided to take a private lesson which I couldn't afford but I made it a priority to save money for it and it was the best decision of my life. Those few hours we spent together on the slopes became a turning point, I cannot even begin to tell u how much better I got at skiing and I only booked 3 hour lesson. One other point, I always thought my boots fit me just fine until I decided to tighten them up a bit more than I usually do. WHAT A DIFFERENCE! My skis started to feel like the continuation of my feet and I had so so so much more control. Maybe these are silly points and someone might find them useless advice but I trully believe this is what helped me to get better at skiing - tighter boot fit and a private lesson.
As to the weight problems, it's a very bad idea to count calories you consume. Again here is what helped me shed those extra I had on me - I lightened up on the working out and started to eat smaller portions. My routine now is: 2-3 times a week short 20-25 minutes but high intensity cardio and bodyweight workouts and smallsize meals. Someone may say: ohmegosh, that is not enough but I tell u, it is, I kick ass now, never looked better. If you like, check out this girl here and try to follow her routines, http://www.bodyrock.tv/, she is my hero and thanks to her I now look almost like her but not as defined. Oh and I'm not young and I have steel muscles, hubs is in shock (but liking it) :smile:.
I very much hope my puny 2 cents will help u.
 

AliceH

<span style="color:#F89F07";">Angel Diva</span>
#58
Thanks to Rhody, I have pretty pretty skis sitting by the front door waiting for me to get over this pneumonia. The skis are taunting me, I swear!
 

gardenmary

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#59
Thanks to Rhody, I have pretty pretty skis sitting by the front door waiting for me to get over this pneumonia. The skis are taunting me, I swear!
They'll do that. Think of them as the Sirens in "O Brother Where Art Thou". (Now if they could just materialize George Clooney...)
 

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