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Skiing, fear + mental blocks, and frustration

arbusch

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
D

What did you ski that on? I'm looking for a setup for big spring/summer lines particularly couloirs and steeps on snow/crud that will toss around my DPS Tour1 Zeldas and am looking for suggestions. So far I'm looking at BC Camox Birdie or Orbs, since they're actually available to demo in my size (between 156-162 depending on what's available, lol).

I think I skied those on my fat atomic millenniums (110 underfoot) I have had for years. It was pretty powdery in that bowl surprisingly with a few big ice chunks you had to watch out for. I used to use my atomic century but they always felt too soft in steeps on crud which is why I sometimes took the fat skis on big missions. This year I have been using my BC Daemon Birdie for big spring lines. I have been really liking them - stiffer and only 99 underfoot. All my setups have a light dynafit binding on them. I have friends who love the BC Camox for the steeps. I was thinking the Orbs would be fun too.
 

jetski

Diva in Training
I think I skied those on my fat atomic millenniums (110 underfoot) I have had for years. It was pretty powdery in that bowl surprisingly with a few big ice chunks you had to watch out for. I used to use my atomic century but they always felt too soft in steeps on crud which is why I sometimes took the fat skis on big missions. This year I have been using my BC Daemon Birdie for big spring lines. I have been really liking them - stiffer and only 99 underfoot. All my setups have a light dynafit binding on them. I have friends who love the BC Camox for the steeps. I was thinking the Orbs would be fun too.


Thanks so much! Good to know the Dynafits are working well on the Deamons, too; I was wondering if they were heavy enough that you might want a bulkier binding, but would prefer to stick with tech bindings to shave some weight.
 

Kimmyt

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I have been really lucky with skiing in that I feel pretty comfortable doing it and rarely feel scared. An exception was once when I looked down Corbett's, just that first drop and turn had me feeling some flutters. Luckily, it was closed that day so I didn't have to push myself to do it. Aside from that, I quite enjoy billygoating through somewhat treacherous terrain and navigating and finding turns.

Yesterday I got a rare ski day to myself in a year when I have very few ski days (a grand total of 6, maybe I'll get one or two more). Additionally, almost all of those meager days have been spent skiing with my young kids on blue and green terrain. One day I skied by myself but it was early season and not much terrain was open. And yesterday, when I went with a mom-friend of mine. We were so excited to get out without kids that we launched straight into the harder terrain without warming up and spent most of the morning trying to remember how to get out of the backseat. Then, as one does when one only has 3.5 hours to ski because you have to drive 2 hours back to pick up your kids from school, we decided to hike to the upper mountain terrain that I enjoy skiing every spring. And because the entrance to the (more moderate) chute was clogged by bros who were deciding whether or not to drop in, we decided to ski the Second Notch, which has a gnarly fixed-rope downclimb entrance followed by a bunch of exposed rocks and isn't much wider than the the length of your skis. Now, i've skied 2nd notch before, and I didn't exactly enjoy the downclimb entrance, but it wasn't the worst. But this year, whether it was the minimal ski days and terrible ski condition I was in, or my lack of warmup on that given day, or the extra thin coverage due to low snowpack, I fully scared myself. The downclimb was fine, a bit awkward because it was longer than usual to get to the snow and I remember last time my husband handing my skis down to me from above (this time the downclimb was about 20 ft, so I had to carry my skis and poles down as I downclimbed to get to the snow). But then I got to my little snow shelf to put on my skis and had such a hard time getting them on, I was constantly worried about losing them or losing my poles, or sliding down the chute while I lost my poles and not being able to self arrest. Finally, after a brutal struggle I managed to get into my skis, and skied down. But I was shaken, and the snow was extremely variable- the left side of the chute was denser windpacked snow and the right was heavy powdery snow, so each turn I made I had to adjust my stance. So I took a small tumble at the top, just catching my edge a bit and then recovering, and then skied the rest fine although not perhaps in my best form. But I have to say, I haven't felt that scared in a long time skiing, and I sure hope it isn't something that happens more often!

At least I got a decent picture for all that struggle! IMG_3812.HEIC.jpeg
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
Thanks for sharing that, @Kimmyt . I gotta hand it to you for doing that; I would never, in a million years, do something I'd have to reach by climbing down a rope. I have a thing about heights, and narrow heights? No. Way. In my eyes, you had every right to be scared.
 

Abbi

Angel Diva
I have been really lucky with skiing in that I feel pretty comfortable doing it and rarely feel scared. An exception was once when I looked down Corbett's, just that first drop and turn had me feeling some flutters. Luckily, it was closed that day so I didn't have to push myself to do it. Aside from that, I quite enjoy billygoating through somewhat treacherous terrain and navigating and finding turns.

Yesterday I got a rare ski day to myself in a year when I have very few ski days (a grand total of 6, maybe I'll get one or two more). Additionally, almost all of those meager days have been spent skiing with my young kids on blue and green terrain. One day I skied by myself but it was early season and not much terrain was open. And yesterday, when I went with a mom-friend of mine. We were so excited to get out without kids that we launched straight into the harder terrain without warming up and spent most of the morning trying to remember how to get out of the backseat. Then, as one does when one only has 3.5 hours to ski because you have to drive 2 hours back to pick up your kids from school, we decided to hike to the upper mountain terrain that I enjoy skiing every spring. And because the entrance to the (more moderate) chute was clogged by bros who were deciding whether or not to drop in, we decided to ski the Second Notch, which has a gnarly fixed-rope downclimb entrance followed by a bunch of exposed rocks and isn't much wider than the the length of your skis. Now, i've skied 2nd notch before, and I didn't exactly enjoy the downclimb entrance, but it wasn't the worst. But this year, whether it was the minimal ski days and terrible ski condition I was in, or my lack of warmup on that given day, or the extra thin coverage due to low snowpack, I fully scared myself. The downclimb was fine, a bit awkward because it was longer than usual to get to the snow and I remember last time my husband handing my skis down to me from above (this time the downclimb was about 20 ft, so I had to carry my skis and poles down as I downclimbed to get to the snow). But then I got to my little snow shelf to put on my skis and had such a hard time getting them on, I was constantly worried about losing them or losing my poles, or sliding down the chute while I lost my poles and not being able to self arrest. Finally, after a brutal struggle I managed to get into my skis, and skied down. But I was shaken, and the snow was extremely variable- the left side of the chute was denser windpacked snow and the right was heavy powdery snow, so each turn I made I had to adjust my stance. So I took a small tumble at the top, just catching my edge a bit and then recovering, and then skied the rest fine although not perhaps in my best form. But I have to say, I haven't felt that scared in a long time skiing, and I sure hope it isn't something that happens more often!

At least I got a decent picture for all that struggle! View attachment 15693

WOW!!!

as for me? Not if hell had frozen over! I am in awe!
 

Kimmyt

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
O.M.G. What the hell were you thinking?

Oh. You did this on 4/20. It all makes sense now.

Well, I've done it before, and tbh the skiing isn't the hard part of it after the first few turns. Of course, I have never done it with a measly 6 days under my belt so next time I'll make sure my ski legs are in better shape. And despite living in CO, there was no partaking of the 420 on my part!
 

fgor

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I posted this thread last season after having to give up on a run that I was just too scared to ski down. I felt miserable about how many things I was scared of while skiing - technical runs that didn't seem to phase others, cat tracks, any amount of powder at all. Everyone here had great advice and pointed out that I was being a bit hard on myself as well. I just wanted to post a bit of an update :smile:

The scary technical run - I still haven't tried it again, and to be honest, I don't have any real burning need to. I'm sure at some point, when the snow conditions are good and I'm feeling up to it, I might give it a go, but I've had some awesome successes elsewhere on the mountain and skied other new challenging runs!

The scary cat track - I've skied it a few times! I just take it mega slowly, side slip down the steeper parts, pizza a lot on the flatter parts, and keep to one side so faster skiers (literally everyone else) can get past me. I probably look like a fool to people watching from the lift that passes directly across the track, but oh well. It means I can get to some cool runs and I don't mind looking like an idiot, because I know that I'm a better skier than a scary cat track makes me appear!

All the advice and commiseration in this thread really helped a lot. Remembering how to ski again this season came back a lot easier than I thought it would, all my lessons last season had helped a ton and I started feeling more comfortable on skis again after a couple of days. I find that it took quite a few days to feel confident again on skis, but then again, last season it probably took me fully half the season.

We had a nice day with 15cm of new, slightly wind-affected snow that had been left sitting overnight. I've still never been able to make turns in powder - too much of a mental block, unless it's like 3cm on top of groomers - but after a very slow, hesitant run, I was able to start linking together some big nervous turns in the powder! Huge achievement for me


Somehow, this next one is just as big a milestone. This is a part of the mountain I've never been to before. The snow conditions were really cool, but challenging for me - off piste is still not my forte - and honestly really quite steep. I managed to make hesitant turns all the way from top to bottom, and even linked a couple (not many)! It's marked as a black on the current trail map but the physical sign when you traverse across to it actually says double black. I nearly backed out when I saw the sign :laughter: but I figured I'd go and have a look at it at least!


The bottom part isn't as steep but the snow was a little choppier.


It was an enormous achievement and definitely a mental breakthrough for me. I was absolutely nervous - you can see that in the video nearer the top of the run especially - but I didn't break down and freeze up, I kept moving and shuffling around and tapping the snow and planning out my next turn. It felt like an epic quest to get to the bottom and it was pretty cool enjoying the views out that side and the nice snow conditions!

(must point out that even if I had been too scared to continue, it would have been ok, I could have walked up and out or side stepped the entire way down :smile: )
 

DebbieSue

Certified Ski Diva
I posted this thread last season after having to give up on a run that I was just too scared to ski down. I felt miserable about how many things I was scared of while skiing - technical runs that didn't seem to phase others, cat tracks, any amount of powder at all. Everyone here had great advice and pointed out that I was being a bit hard on myself as well. I just wanted to post a bit of an update :smile:

The scary technical run - I still haven't tried it again, and to be honest, I don't have any real burning need to. I'm sure at some point, when the snow conditions are good and I'm feeling up to it, I might give it a go, but I've had some awesome successes elsewhere on the mountain and skied other new challenging runs!

The scary cat track - I've skied it a few times! I just take it mega slowly, side slip down the steeper parts, pizza a lot on the flatter parts, and keep to one side so faster skiers (literally everyone else) can get past me. I probably look like a fool to people watching from the lift that passes directly across the track, but oh well. It means I can get to some cool runs and I don't mind looking like an idiot, because I know that I'm a better skier than a scary cat track makes me appear!

All the advice and commiseration in this thread really helped a lot. Remembering how to ski again this season came back a lot easier than I thought it would, all my lessons last season had helped a ton and I started feeling more comfortable on skis again after a couple of days. I find that it took quite a few days to feel confident again on skis, but then again, last season it probably took me fully half the season.

We had a nice day with 15cm of new, slightly wind-affected snow that had been left sitting overnight. I've still never been able to make turns in powder - too much of a mental block, unless it's like 3cm on top of groomers - but after a very slow, hesitant run, I was able to start linking together some big nervous turns in the powder! Huge achievement for me


Somehow, this next one is just as big a milestone. This is a part of the mountain I've never been to before. The snow conditions were really cool, but challenging for me - off piste is still not my forte - and honestly really quite steep. I managed to make hesitant turns all the way from top to bottom, and even linked a couple (not many)! It's marked as a black on the current trail map but the physical sign when you traverse across to it actually says double black. I nearly backed out when I saw the sign :laughter: but I figured I'd go and have a look at it at least!


The bottom part isn't as steep but the snow was a little choppier.


It was an enormous achievement and definitely a mental breakthrough for me. I was absolutely nervous - you can see that in the video nearer the top of the run especially - but I didn't break down and freeze up, I kept moving and shuffling around and tapping the snow and planning out my next turn. It felt like an epic quest to get to the bottom and it was pretty cool enjoying the views out that side and the nice snow conditions!

(must point out that even if I had been too scared to continue, it would have been ok, I could have walked up and out or side stepped the entire way down :smile: )
Wicked excellent (as we say in Massachusetts)!! You seemed in control throughout and your stance looks pretty good to me…a non-instructor. I think the Taffy Pink FlyLow bibs are making you brave! I snagged a pair on sale and can’t wait to see if they do anything for my skiing this Winter.
 

newboots

Angel Diva
Wow! Wow! I am so impressed, and so happy that you got the help you needed!

I was scared every time you picked up speed at the top of that double diamond! :brr: It's like the violent thrillers I sometimes watch on Netflix: I turn off the sound and look halfway away from the screen. (And I'm still scared at the thought of that cat track.)

The Flylow bibs are definitely helping. :party:
 

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