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Skiing after broken hip?

Evangelina

Diva in Training
#1
Hello,

was wondering if anybody ever broke their hip and went back to skiing?

I am 44 and had a complete fracture (subcapital femoral neck fracture) of my hip on New years eve 2017 from a skiing accident.
I had emergency surgery done and have now three large pins in there.
I spent the last five months on crutches and am putting in an immense effort into PT and am now in the process of learning how to walk again.

Anybody else out there like this? Thanks.
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
#3
Hello,

was wondering if anybody ever broke their hip and went back to skiing?

I am 44 and had a complete fracture (subcapital femoral neck fracture) of my hip on New years eve 2017 from a skiing accident.
I had emergency surgery done and have now three large pins in there.
I spent the last five months on crutches and am putting in an immense effort into PT and am now in the process of learning how to walk again.

Anybody else out there like this? Thanks.
Welcome! Good for you for making good progress. What level of skier were you? Where do you ski the most?

It's not the same, but recently I met and skied with an older man who has had two hips replaced and a knee. The surgeries were relatively recent, meaning in the last 5-10 years. Certainly hasn't slowed him down when skiing.

I did knee rehab six years ago (Summer 2012). Took a couple seasons to get fully comfortable off-piste but taking lessons regularly helped a lot. I was about 55 when I started the lessons with very experienced instructors. End result is that I'm a much better skier now than I ever expected to become.
 

volklgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#5
@vickie Not sure about that. Mine was only a teacup fracture of the acetabulum (the lower portion of the pelvic bone, behind the femur), and it was non-displaced, so no surgery was required. All I had was 11 weeks completely non weight-bearing, then intensive PT, both in-pool and on-the-floor.

What I know of pinned fractures, once the bone heals over the pins, they are typically even stronger than the original bone. The only real worry would be if there's some type of additional stress elsewhere in the femur. I would guess that once PT has sufficiently strengthened the supporting structures, skiing again should be a "go".

Returning to skiing after any injury requires significant mental toughness, patience, lots of positive self-talk, and a willingness to just take it easy and enjoy those brief moments of success without letting the "oh shits!" win. Nine years later, and I still bear the mental scars in the form of absolute paranoia about people coming up behind me or passing too closely, and even my closest friends and family will get a "F Off!!" from me when they get to close, and they KNOW how freaked I am about the whole thing.
 

Babette

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#7
Returning to skiing after any injury requires significant mental toughness, patience, lots of positive self-talk, and a willingness to just take it easy and enjoy those brief moments of success without letting the "oh shits!" win. Nine years later, and I still bear the mental scars in the form of absolute paranoia about people coming up behind me or passing too closely, and even my closest friends and family will get a "F Off!!" from me when they get to close, and they KNOW how freaked I am about the whole thing.
Wow this is so true. @Evangelina you're a heroine in my book. You went through some real trauma there. I'm up for knee replacements which have become so routine it hasn't quite occurred to me that I might not ever ski again. There's a lot of psychology involved, a lot of learning about how our thoughts control our emotions ... and controlling and questioning the validity of our thoughts can help a great deal. (Sloppy description of cognitive behavioral therapy there, I'm a therapist).

The topic of sports psychology is interesting to me ... does anyone have good reading, YouTubes, etc.?
 

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