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Ski Recommendations for lightweight skier

tinygirl

Diva in Training
#1
Hi everyone! I've been skiing for about 10 years, usually just a week or two each season. I'd consider myself to be an advanced intermediate skier (and most of my friends would agree). Since I don't ski too much and don't have a lot of storage space in my apartment, I generally rent, but I'm beginning to realize that the beginner skis they usually give me are just not cutting it. On my most recent trip, however, I tried some upgraded skis and felt entirely overpowered.

I'll probably keep renting because of the above concerns, but I'm wondering what sort of skis I should look into on my next trip. I'm about 5' 3" (160cm) and 100lbs. All of the ski length calculators say I should look for skis in the 148-156cm range, which sounds about right. Based on some comments in another thread, someone mentioned there could be minimum weights for women's skis, so I'm wondering if juniors skis might work better.

Thanks in advance for all your help!
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
#2
Hi, tinygirl! Welcome to the forum! I'll say it before anyone else here does: you gotta take care of your boots first, because really, they're even more important than your skis. Do you own a pair yet? If not, go to a good boot fitter and work with him to find a pair that's right for you.

As for skis, where do you generally ski? East? West? What's your skiing style? Are you aggressive? Tentative? Do you stick to groomers or do you go off piste? Tell us more.
 

tinygirl

Diva in Training
#3
Thanks for the quick reply!

I unfortunately don't own my own boots, although I do plan on buying a pair hopefully this season! One of my concerns there is that I want to make sure I buy boots that will fit the kind of skis I end up renting going forward :smile:

I've mostly skied out west the past few years, but generally ski at least a few days on the east coast as well. I'm generally pretty aggressive when skiing and go just about anywhere on piste and in any condition (since I don't travel enough days to be picky about snow).
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
#4
Boots....will fit just about any ski. If for some reason they put you in a junior boot, then that could be a problem if the boot doesn't marry up with a adult binding. But unless you're wearing kids shoes, you should be able to get a adult boot.

I know, skis are sooo pretty. But the boots are your connection to the ski. And most newer skiers are in boots at least 2 sizes too big. And rentals...FOR SURE! Imagine no pain, no slipping inside your boot, no broken parts (rentals) and boots that flex like their suppose to.

As for skis, some places will list the skis they have for rent at the high performance level. I was able to do this last year at Lake Louise. I was only going to be 2 days, so I wasn't lugging my skis out. Took my boots though! I was able to order ahead on line, which it looks like a lot of places are doing this year because of Covid. So the skis were waiting for me and my boots to adjust the bindings.

So before you go, take a look and see if your rental places has this option. Post what you think, or ask us for suggestions based on what's available. Because suggesting a ski and then finding out it's not something they rent, no point.
 
#5
But the boots are your connection to the ski. And most newer skiers are in boots at least 2 sizes too big. And rentals...FOR SURE! Imagine no pain, no slipping inside your boot, no broken parts (rentals) and boots that flex like their suppose to.
Totally agree with the above, and second the suggestion to find a good boot fitter (as opposed to a boot salesman. Then, once you have your own boots, you can rent demo skis wherever you ski, and get a chance to try out various skis before you decide to buy. I've found that by mid-Feb or so, a lot of places will actually sell you the skis you demo'd at a discount. I've bought a couple of my favorite skis this way.

Bonus: you don't have to deal with the lines at the rental area; usually you can get the demos the night before, and there are usually no lines at the demo ski shops.
 

kleinekarnes

Diva in Training
#6
Hey! I so second the boot thing!!! Don't worry at all about it fitting the ski... unless like before someone mentioned you have kids feet. I do have kids feet and have that problem, but they do sell junior race boots that are slightly smaller and fit an adult binding. But I'm gonna guess that your feet aren't as small as mine... since I've only come across 1 other adult in my life whose feet were the same size as mine.

In the meantime, like others said, find a good boot fitter. Best case, make an appointment or West to do so. I made the mistake of going to a salesman back in the day that I thought was a boot fitter... not so much... multiple sizes too big because he didn't have anything smaller... Midwest. If you're gonna do it not in the west, look for someone that fits the local ski race team. They'll know more. Otherwise, check out somewhere out west.

Also, after the boots, then come back to look at skis. Feel free to do the demos if you already rent. Better ski for the rental money. And when you're ready, try some women specific skis because they're usually lighter. But beware... the bindings usually make things way heavier lol. I always wanted a pair of the Blizzard pearl skis lol. But never got them. I've heard some people really like the head joy series of skis and they are pretty light. Lol for something around 82 underfoot if you're mostly on piste. Skis are pretty personal, but those might be a couple options to start the hunt with. There's so many good skis out there!!!!

Good luck!
Jenny
 

tinygirl

Diva in Training
#7
Thanks so much for all the suggestions, everyone! I will definitely look to get some good boots first. My feet are pretty average, so I don't think I'll need juniors boots at least :-)

I also like the suggestion to pick a rental shop (or demo shop) first, so I'll come back once my ski trips are more firmed up!
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
#8
Hi everyone! I've been skiing for about 10 years, usually just a week or two each season. I'd consider myself to be an advanced intermediate skier (and most of my friends would agree). Since I don't ski too much and don't have a lot of storage space in my apartment, I generally rent, but I'm beginning to realize that the beginner skis they usually give me are just not cutting it. On my most recent trip, however, I tried some upgraded skis and felt entirely overpowered.

I'll probably keep renting because of the above concerns, but I'm wondering what sort of skis I should look into on my next trip. I'm about 5' 3" (160cm) and 100lbs. All of the ski length calculators say I should look for skis in the 148-156cm range, which sounds about right. Based on some comments in another thread, someone mentioned there could be minimum weights for women's skis, so I'm wondering if juniors skis might work better.

Thanks in advance for all your help!
Thanks so much for all the suggestions, everyone! I will definitely look to get some good boots first. My feet are pretty average, so I don't think I'll need juniors boots at least :-)

I also like the suggestion to pick a rental shop (or demo shop) first, so I'll come back once my ski trips are more firmed up!
Welcome! When I started skiing more regularly, it was when I was skiing 10-15 days with my daughter as she learned ages 4-6. First purchase was a pair of recreational boots during an early season sale. They were "new old stock" from a previous season. I owned boots but they were about 10 years old by then and not a current design with current materials, so it was worth the upgrade.

Do you have a local ski shop? Some people do a season lease for the first year or two when not skiing that many days. Avoids the hassle of renting every time. Boots won't be great but at least you can take your time finding the best fit possible.

I'm petite, 5'0", 110 pounds. Have always used adult gear. My mother was happy when my feet grew into Size 7 so that finding adult shoes wasn't a big deal. Back in the 1970s, finding good looking women's shoes under size 6 was difficult.

Have you found the Gearipedia section?
https://www.theskidiva.com/forums/index.php?forums/gearipedia.49/
 

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