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Ski boot flex help needed

Sandrinjo

Certified Ski Diva
Hi guys,

I have a question regarding a ski boot flex.

I moved to a ski resort and advanced so quickly that I kept changing my equipment and now I am pretty confused about what flex boot I need.

I had pretty bad shin bangs last year and need to get a new boot.

What flex would you recommend for me? I would also take a boot recommendation :smile: (I need 98mm last)

I am 5'4'', 140 ibs and at this point I can ski everything but I am not as good as some of my expert friends. So I ski fast and I ski the back of the mountain, small cliffs, all blacks, moguls - I try to stay away from double blacks (I can ski them but I am very slow and cautious ). I ski with very good skiers so compared to them I am slower on some more technical terrain. I am currently in 95 flex boot but looking maybe to go up as I need new boots anyways.

Any advice is welcome. I would also like to know what flex you ski compared to your ability level, as leverage.

Thank you.
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
Can you go to a bootfitter for a proper fitting? There are anatomical considerations beyond height/weight/skill level that also factor into boot selection and flex choice. Also, flex rating is not consistent accross brands.

For me.. I'm an advanced skier, will ski mostly anything on the mountain. I prefer to be off piste in bumps and trees most of the time, and I don't ski fast there. I do like to ski faster on groomers. For my AT boots I have a hybrid Atomic boot that's a 95 flex. My current (new) downhill boots are a Technica 120 flex, but I may end up getting them softened a little bit. Haven't skied them enough yet to figure that out, but they are feeling pretty stiff. My hypermobile ankles and a long Tibia have me overflexing the 105 in this series of boots which bumped me up to the 120 with the thought that we can soften as needed from my bootfitter. I'm 5'4" and ~125 lbs right now.
 
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Sandrinjo

Certified Ski Diva
Can you go to a bootfitter for a proper fitting? There are anatomical considerations beyond height/weight/skill level that also factor into boot selection and flex choice. Also, flex rating is not consistent accross brands.

For me.. I'm an advanced skier, will ski mostly anything on the mountain. I prefer to be off piste in bumps and trees most of the time, and I don't ski fast there. I do like to ski faster on groomers. For my AT boots I have a hybrid Atomic boot that's a 95 flex. My current (new) downhill boots are a Technica 120 flex, but I may end up getting them softened a little bit. Haven't skied them enough yet to figure that out, but they are feeling pretty stiff. My hypermobile ankles and a long Tibia have me overflexing the 105 in this series of boots which bumped me up to the 120 with the thought that we can soften as needed from my bootfitter. I'm 5'4" and ~125 lbs right now.
Thank you.

I just cant find a good boot fitter where I live. it is all kids out of high school seasonally hired that I feel don't know much.

I did the fisher app - I saw it on another thread and this my result for three tries:

right foot:
length 240 241 238
ball width 95 93 95
instep 65 68 64
naviculat height 39 40 42
heel with 59 60 61

left foot:
length 237 236 237
ball width 97 96 97
instep 64 63 66
navicular height 42 40 41
heel width: 58 60 60

I am thinking about nordica pro machine 95 (same flex i have now -atomic hawx 95, 24.5 size) or to go up and get nordica pro machine 105? I tried the 105 in 24.5 and they seemed very comfortable (usually i would have trouble putting my foot in the boot of flex higher than 95).

Thank you.
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
Thank you.

I just cant find a good boot fitter where I live. it is all kids out of high school seasonally hired that I feel don't know much.

I did the fisher app - I saw it on another thread and this my result for three tries:

right foot:
length 240 241 238
ball width 95 93 95
instep 65 68 64
naviculat height 39 40 42
heel with 59 60 61

left foot:
length 237 236 237
ball width 97 96 97
instep 64 63 66
navicular height 42 40 41
heel width: 58 60 60

I am thinking about nordica pro machine 95 (same flex i have now -atomic hawx 95, 24.5 size) or to go up and get nordica pro machine 105? I tried the 105 in 24.5 and they seemed very comfortable (usually i would have trouble putting my foot in the boot of flex higher than 95).

Thank you

Out of curiosity, have you also tried on the 23.5 in these boots? A bit of a red flag comes up when you say they seem very comfortable. They should be very snug everywhere to start. Not saying they should be uncomfortable, but "very comfortable" scares me a little bit. :smile:
 

Sandrinjo

Certified Ski Diva
Out of curiosity, have you also tried on the 23.5 in these boots? A bit of a red flag comes up when you say they seem very comfortable. They should be very snug everywhere to start. Not saying they should be uncomfortable, but "very comfortable" scares me a little bit. :smile:
I did not.. they dont sell them in the stores here... i actually by accident met someone who had them and saw that they are my size and asked to try them :smile:

I was always wondering if I need to size down, but every time I tried a 23.5 boot I could not get my foot in (like not even close) so I gave up.. they do sell the 95 here in the stores, so I was actually just thinking after getting those measurements that maybe I should try the 23.5 ... i was just super surprised how easy it was for me to put them on and take them off..even with my Atomix hawks sometimes it is a struggle and there are many boots I tried with higher flex than 95 in 24.5 and I could not put them on...

thanks again for your help :D
 

Analisa

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Flex isn’t standardized from brand to brand, and can be designed in different ways (progressive flex where the boot gets a lot stiffer the more you flex it, or it can ramp up less dramatically). Boots I’ve owned in the past range from 110s to 115s, but my current pair is the stiffest I’ve owned and is rated a 105.

Shin bang is usually a sign a boot is too big or that the cuff is a poor fit. (Or backseat skiing & landings, but poor fit tends to make people compensate with backseat skiing). Finding a proper cuff fit and any modifications to the stock boot will be difficult to impossible to do on your own.

I’m curious what area you’re in and if we can help you find a fitter. I had bad luck getting good service at shops with seasonal and inexperienced boot sellers, but eventually got the names of their fitters and was able to make appointments with a true pro who can evaluate a stock boot and make modifications. It might help to ask who their head fitter is, or someone who has gone through Master Fit training.

Finding a fitter that respects and listens to women was super hard but so worth it. Getting that part of my setup was integral to having the best power transfer to my skis & bindings, and I had a huge progression growth spurt one I got the right stock boot and the right modifications to get it dialed to my body. (When I step back and think about the vast variety of foot shapes that need to fit in ~20 boot molds, it really becomes apparent how few people can ski right out of the box)
 

Sandrinjo

Certified Ski Diva
Flex isn’t standardized from brand to brand, and can be designed in different ways (progressive flex where the boot gets a lot stiffer the more you flex it, or it can ramp up less dramatically). Boots I’ve owned in the past range from 110s to 115s, but my current pair is the stiffest I’ve owned and is rated a 105.

Shin bang is usually a sign a boot is too big or that the cuff is a poor fit. (Or backseat skiing & landings, but poor fit tends to make people compensate with backseat skiing). Finding a proper cuff fit and any modifications to the stock boot will be difficult to impossible to do on your own.

I’m curious what area you’re in and if we can help you find a fitter. I had bad luck getting good service at shops with seasonal and inexperienced boot sellers, but eventually got the names of their fitters and was able to make appointments with a true pro who can evaluate a stock boot and make modifications. It might help to ask who their head fitter is, or someone who has gone through Master Fit training.

Finding a fitter that respects and listens to women was super hard but so worth it. Getting that part of my setup was integral to having the best power transfer to my skis & bindings, and I had a huge progression growth spurt one I got the right stock boot and the right modifications to get it dialed to my body. (When I step back and think about the vast variety of foot shapes that need to fit in ~20 boot molds, it really becomes apparent how few people can ski right out of the box)
Thank you.

Last season was my second season on those boots and I did ok the first season..second is when I got big shin bangs ( I still have bruises now ) so they probably packed out...i also made the mistake of unbuckling my boots at the end of the season when the pain was hard to handle so I can keep skiing and that probably made it way worse.

I am actually in Vail. The only boot experienced boot fitter i heard about is a guy from breck but I called so many times and they would always try to schedule me with someone else. I went to so many places and all the boot fitters are barely 20 .. and I actually know two guys and both of them do not even ski (nor snowboard) so I was just very skeptical... but I would love to hear any suggestions. Thanks
 

SMichael08

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Thank you.

Last season was my second season on those boots and I did ok the first season..second is when I got big shin bangs ( I still have bruises now ) so they probably packed out...i also made the mistake of unbuckling my boots at the end of the season when the pain was hard to handle so I can keep skiing and that probably made it way worse.

I am actually in Vail. The only boot experienced boot fitter i heard about is a guy from breck but I called so many times and they would always try to schedule me with someone else. I went to so many places and all the boot fitters are barely 20 .. and I actually know two guys and both of them do not even ski (nor snowboard) so I was just very skeptical... but I would love to hear any suggestions. Thanks
If you're in Vail I would suggest contacting Outdoor Divas. They've been recommended a few times on this forum and I called them up when I was having a hard time in my boot search (21.5s aren't easy to find) and they graciously spent abou 15 minutes on the phone with me giving me some good tips and things to consider even though they wouldn't be making a sale from it. If I were anywhere near Vail I would have given them a visit in person if I could have.
 

Kimmyt

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Where did you try and schedule in Breck? I go to Racers Edge and although the og fitter is Chuck and its hard to get in with him, the rest of the guys on staff, though younger, still know what they are doing. In Vail, Greg Hoffmann is highly recommended.
 

Analisa

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
+1 to outdoor divas. I've seen them recommended several times. Also if there's a fitter you want to work with and they try to schedule you with someone else, don't feel like you can't self advocate. You can ask about how far out you'd need to book to get their best fitter (Nov-Dec are peak season for Seattle and services with my dude can book out 4-8 weeks. Mid-season might be peak for a resort town and the best service might mean getting an appointment in spring). You can ask about the alternate fitter's credentials. They might be trying to withhold top tier service from you, or they might be under the impression most customers want fast service, when your goal is to invest in a boot that will serve you for a long time now that you've grown out of that most explosive part of your progression curve.

I 100% relate to how much the process sucks. I considered signing up for a bootfitter class just so I could come to the appointment with the knowledge and vocabulary to self advocate. (My issue wasn't inexperienced fitters so much as it was condescending fitters who treated me like I didn't know anything about gear and tried to gaslight me about what felt best on my foot and would help me accomplish my goals).

If you ever make the trip to Denver for other purposes, I'm happy to get a rec from my evo fitter who does some training and management for other stores. If worst comes to worst, I can definitely get a name of someone strong and qualified in Denver.
 

Sandrinjo

Certified Ski Diva
If you're in Vail I would suggest contacting Outdoor Divas. They've been recommended a few times on this forum and I called them up when I was having a hard time in my boot search (21.5s aren't easy to find) and they graciously spent abou 15 minutes on the phone with me giving me some good tips and things to consider even though they wouldn't be making a sale from it. If I were anywhere near Vail I would have given them a visit in person if I could have.
thank you. i will stop by them.
 

Sandrinjo

Certified Ski Diva
Where did you try and schedule in Breck? I go to Racers Edge and although the og fitter is Chuck and its hard to get in with him, the rest of the guys on staff, though younger, still know what they are doing. In Vail, Greg Hoffmann is highly recommended.
The guy is call Jason, Breck sports.
I will look into greg. Do you know where he works? Thank you.
 

Sandrinjo

Certified Ski Diva
+1 to outdoor divas. I've seen them recommended several times. Also if there's a fitter you want to work with and they try to schedule you with someone else, don't feel like you can't self advocate. You can ask about how far out you'd need to book to get their best fitter (Nov-Dec are peak season for Seattle and services with my dude can book out 4-8 weeks. Mid-season might be peak for a resort town and the best service might mean getting an appointment in spring). You can ask about the alternate fitter's credentials. They might be trying to withhold top tier service from you, or they might be under the impression most customers want fast service, when your goal is to invest in a boot that will serve you for a long time now that you've grown out of that most explosive part of your progression curve.

I 100% relate to how much the process sucks. I considered signing up for a bootfitter class just so I could come to the appointment with the knowledge and vocabulary to self advocate. (My issue wasn't inexperienced fitters so much as it was condescending fitters who treated me like I didn't know anything about gear and tried to gaslight me about what felt best on my foot and would help me accomplish my goals).

If you ever make the trip to Denver for other purposes, I'm happy to get a rec from my evo fitter who does some training and management for other stores. If worst comes to worst, I can definitely get a name of someone strong and qualified in Denver.
Thank you>
Would love to hear Denver recommendations as i do go to Denver often.
 

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