• Women skiers, this is the place for you -- an online community without the male-orientation you'll find in conventional ski magazines and internet ski forums. At TheSkiDiva.com, you can connect with other women to talk about skiing in a way that you can relate to, about things that you find of interest. Be sure to join our community to participate (women only, please!). Registration is fast and simple. Just be sure to add webmaster@theskidiva.com to your address book so your registration activation emails won't be routed as spam. And please give careful consideration to your user name -- it will not be changed once your registration is confirmed.

Self Arrest Techniques?

Janis Williams

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#41
Just in case anyone is wondering - yes the two dots in the top right of that picture are people. The run top is not visible from there and the pic is maybe 2/3 of the way down to the rock band where you need to veer left quickly.
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#43
I must admit that I worry about the amount of strength needed to use a pole to arrest a slide. You have to climb that pole and get weight way on the top of the handle. However, just digging in a pole - even if holding it low near the basket - will spin you around so you are not sliding head first. It acts like a pivot point and your body will rotate around the pole.
 

snow addict

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#44
I must admit that I worry about the amount of strength needed to use a pole to arrest a slide. You have to climb that pole and get weight way on the top of the handle. However, just digging in a pole - even if holding it low near the basket - will spin you around so you are not sliding head first. It acts like a pivot point and your body will rotate around the pole.
This is if you still have your poles after the fall, that's why I don't understand when people don't use the loops. Basically everywhere where the ability to self-arrest can be critical your chances increase if your equipment is still attached to you.
 

Ursula

Certified Ski Diva
#46
And if you want to see some spectacular crashes, some with arresting, see Bob Barnes video on "Ragdoll"
Yes, the first one is me. It took me about four tries to finally come to a stop! Things happen fast when you go over on an over 40 degree slope. ;o)
Ursula
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#47
I love Bob Barnes videos! I have watched his instruction in self-arrest. I must admit that rag doll falls concern me the most. And... some of those skis stayed on WAY too long after the fall. My DH sets his DIN really high because his technique (or lack of finesse) causes him to pre-release on steep hard turns. I am glad to be a finesse skier. I can set my DIN low because I never pre-release.
 
#48
And if you want to see some spectacular crashes, some with arresting, see Bob Barnes video on "Ragdoll"
Yes, the first one is me. It took me about four tries to finally come to a stop! Things happen fast when you go over on an over 40 degree slope. ;o)
Ursula
Bummer that you hit a rock up there! Still can't believe you emerged unhurt from that one Ursula! Phew. :smile:
Very cool to watch it right after the self arrest tutorial. It's apparent that you were using the exact moves from the demonstration video. Tx for posting those together.
 

litterbug

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#49
Thanks, Ursula! Somehow I'd never noticed that you need one hand at the top of the pole to make it work, which is probably why my brief efforts failed. One of these quiet weekdays I'm going to give the self arrest a try on softer snow at a moderate pitch. That might give me a fighting chance next time I start to slide on a hard surface. As for rolling, I think that might take more practice. :becky:
 

snoWYmonkey

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#52
Sure! I was doing a demonstration on how to self arrest with skis on and it was so steep that I couldn't set the edge without doing a sideways push up against the hill with my hands. It was a little freaky and embarrassing the practice makes perfect as long as it's a safe spot. Is hubby okay?
 

echo_NY

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#53
I have had to self arrest off Spankys ladder into ruby bowl. I flipped on my belly and dug into the slope with my arms and punched into the snow and dug my snowboard on the side of the slope. My arms punched in the snow plus my snowboard helped me to stop sliding. I only slid maybe 20 ft, but it happened so so fast. I couldn’t punch at first bc it was pure rock. But as soon as I got to the fluffy stuff, I punched away. It was scary!

If you lose your equipment use your boot to kick into the snow while on your belly to stop yourself from sliding.

If anything make sure you are not head first. Do what you can to get your equipment in front and perpendicular to the slope and then dig in to get yourself to stop. Belly first so you can use your hands to grab the slope or use your arms to punch thru the snow and stop yourself.

I agree you want to lose the poles ASAP. Preventing injury is the priority...!
 

Fluffy Kitty

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#55
Last weekend, I tripped and fell onto my front side on a steep trail, with my head pointing downhill. At first, I was pretty relaxed about it. It was a bit icy, but I had a lot of contact on the ground. Surely, I thought, I would come to a stop soon enough.

However, about ten yards down, I realized I was actually picking up speed! My skis were still attached to my feet, uphill, but they sure were not contributing any friction. The poles were under me. Time to panic.

Out of desperation, I stuck both my thumbs into the snow. They were the only appendages over which I had any control. And, the snow had just softened enough that it actually worked! Well, another couple of yards later.

Total skiddage: 20+ yards...

Not anything I would recommend... more like a funny story. Thought of this thread immediately.
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#56
I've been in that situation. I set a ski down on the snow above me and used its edge to get myself turned around so my head was uphill. Then I used both skis when they were below me to brake.

Glad your thumbs are OK! Good call. Sliding uncontrollably is certainly scary.
 

VTsnowflower

Certified Ski Diva
#58
There is definitely a right and wrong way to use pole straps too, in terms of thumb safety. I've torn ligaments in my thumb before too until I learned how to put them on to keep my thumbs safe. (Basically - hand up and through the loop, then bring the hand down onto the grip so both straps are between your hand and the pole as you hold the grip. You let go, the pole drops around your wrist/hand.
We tell the kids - the rabbit comes up from the hole (hand through the strap loop from below) and grabs the carrot (the pole, with strap included.)
 

Members Online

No members online now.