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Rossi Temptation 80 2016 or Rossi sprayer for first skis?

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
She's a student, so I get the price issue, but you get what you pay for too.
Some older skis that are actually new can be an issue. Depends on how they were stored.
 

scandium

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I just re read what I wrote and realise I may have come across as very rude - not my intention! I 100% understand being on a budget and wanting to ski, but I was meaning to frame it in the context that renting skis may make more financial sense than buying at this point especially when trying to buy from the southern hemisphere during ski season and only needing the skis for a week per season. Rental shops should also maintain their skis so you remove the cost of maintenance and minor repairs.
 

elephantseal2

Diva in Training
Agreed with the above about older skis. Is the fact that you're mostly looking at significantly older ski models a price issue, or an availability issue because you want to buy locally?
It's a bit of both! I'm a student so price is a big factor for me. I also live in a coastal/rural area (not near any mountains or ski shops) so skiing isnt too popular where i live and most second hand gear will be older models and straight skis. I may just have to wait for next season to buy my skis (there's a pop up ski shop, a couple hrs away from me that opens once a year selling last seasons swiss imported ex rental/demo skis.)
 

elephantseal2

Diva in Training
I just re read what I wrote and realise I may have come across as very rude - not my intention! I 100% understand being on a budget and wanting to ski, but I was meaning to frame it in the context that renting skis may make more financial sense than buying at this point especially when trying to buy from the southern hemisphere during ski season and only needing the skis for a week per season. Rental shops should also maintain their skis so you remove the cost of maintenance and minor repairs.
And no, no worries at all! :smile: I think you're right, It may just be a better option to rent for now, especially since we're right in the middle of ski season at the moment
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
Another advantage of renting is that you could try out skis of different lengths. Say up to about your nose. Definitely better to have skis that are at least at your chin.
 

elephantseal2

Diva in Training
Another advantage of renting is that you could try out skis of different lengths. Say up to about your nose. Definitely better to have skis that are at least at your chin.
I thought that for skis with tip/ tail rocker, the skis should be head height because they ski short?
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
I thought that for skis with tip/ tail rocker, the skis should be head height because they ski short?
It's not quite that simple. You're correct that if there is a lot of rocker, then going longer makes sense. But a longer ski is somewhat harder to maneuver for an intermediate. The skis that I own range from 148cm to 160cm. They are quite different in terms of width and shape, as well as materials.

I ended up with the BP88 @145cm for a couple days when I got free demo skis as part of a lesson package. I fully expected them to feel too short since I'm 5'0" (152cm) and my 85mm all-mountain skis are 159cm. I was wrong. They were fine. Normally I would ask for the next size up, but another Ski Diva had that pair already.

Not all tip and tail rocker lengths are the same. Also makes a difference how much "camber" is part of the design.

Bottom line is ideally it's good to have a chance to check out a few different skis, including different lengths, before making a purchase. Although rental skis are probably not what you might find to buy, you can still see how different lengths feel on the terrain you like to ski.

Note that in general, best to stick to skis that less than 4 years out of date. One option is to buy a pair of skis that should work, use them for a season, and plan on selling them afterwards.
 

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