• Women skiers, this is the place for you -- an online community without the male-orientation you'll find in conventional ski magazines and internet ski forums. At TheSkiDiva.com, you can connect with other women to talk about skiing in a way that you can relate to, about things that you find of interest. Be sure to join our community to participate (women only, please!). Registration is fast and simple. Just be sure to add webmaster@theskidiva.com to your address book so your registration activation emails won't be routed as spam. And please give careful consideration to your user name -- it will not be changed once your registration is confirmed.

Pre-season jitters?

BMR

Certified Ski Diva
#1
This will be my third 'formal' season skiing, not counting a few random trips in my youth days where you pretty much get on skis and hope for the best because you are young and don't care.

Last season I got to a point where I feel pretty comfortable on most blues and even a couple 'easy' blacks. Also upgraded my boots and skis at the end of the season, and it actually made a huge difference in my confidence and ability.

Now, looking forward to getting on the slopes soon, I am super nervous. Like, what if I completely forgot everything? Will muscle memory kick in? Will nerves kick in instead? Last season coming back wasn't too bad, or at least not like starting from the very beginning, but I remember also being super nervous and starting on bunny slopes (which my husband and kids made fun of me for behind my back and won't 'fess up to).

Am I the only one feeling this way, or do you, experienced divas, just put your gear on and charge ahead as if 8 months haven't gone by?
 
#2
My first few runs of the season often feel like I don't know how to turn. After a few it starts to click again, but definitely then takes some time to feel really good like how I ended the season before. Have to get the ski legs back. You are definitely not alone! It gets better over the years though. No shame in starting on a slope you are comfortable on either, that's a smart thing to do to prove to yourself that you are good to go so you can move on with confidence.
 
#5
I keep notes that I've taken after ski lessons on my phone, and I refer to these almost every week throughout the season. It's amazing how much I do actually forget. I think there is a big difference between learning to ski when you are a kid and having that instinct and muscle memory, and, as I did, learning to ski as an adult.
 
#6
I keep notes that I've taken after ski lessons on my phone, and I refer to these almost every week throughout the season. It's amazing how much I do actually forget. I think there is a big difference between learning to ski when you are a kid and having that instinct and muscle memory, and, as I did, learning to ski as an adult.
Agreed 100% as a fellow adult learner.
 
#7
I'm in a very similar situation to you, @BMR. I keep wondering if I'll get on my skis and the whole mountain will (essentially) laugh at me like "Hah! You thought you were getting better? Nope! Back to the beginning for you!" And obviously there's nothing wrong with being a beginner, but I value the progress I've made and don't want to see it disappear.
 

NYSnowflake

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#9
I also find that the lighting early-season is really difficult, especially after lunch and this adds to my anxiety and discomfort on the slopes in November and December. I read something last year that said the angle of the sun prior to the solstice makes seeing on the mountain really hard. I guess it starts to get better before the solstice.
 

vickie

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#10
I have skied for about 10 seasons. Every season I start on the easy green runs. My focus is always on technique, so I want to spend time getting all the pieces together again ... centered/balanced in my boots, stance, hand placement, etc. And almost every day of the season, I start on a green run. I want to make sure my boots feel right and I've got the right layers on and I didn't leave anything laying in the lodge. That run is kind of a Readiness Check for me.

All of those things are about establishing confidence. And since I know I'm going to do those things, I find it settles those first-day or first-run jitters.

Your jitters are likely compounded by Meeting Someone Else's Expectations. I don't have that. I usually ski alone. If I'm skiing with others and they're hauling along Expectations Baggage, well, I'll likely be skiing alone. Skiing is such a freeing thing for me. That baggage is not welcome.
 
#11
I also find that the lighting early-season is really difficult, especially after lunch and this adds to my anxiety and discomfort on the slopes in November and December. I read something last year that said the angle of the sun prior to the solstice makes seeing on the mountain really hard. I guess it starts to get better before the solstice.
Early season, yes the light gets very flat since it gets dark so early. After winter solstice we get more light per day. Nov/Dec I usually ski thru lunch and am off the Mt before 2 because it gets dark.
I agree early skiing is tougher, not much base, sometimes sticks/saplings still popping thru man made (I'm in NY too) early season workouts makes for strong, spring corn snow legs.

Start on an easy trail, and don't forget to breath, if you're curling your toes, STOP, regroup and start over. I like to work on balance and as my name says, I often ski no poles on easy trail to get it all dialed in. It does come back, just like riding a bike. If conditions aren't so hot, head for the brown chari (the pub) Most of all Have fun!
 

WhyKnot

Certified Ski Diva
#12
.Your jitters are likely compounded by Meeting Someone Else's Expectations. I don't have that. I usually ski alone. If I'm skiing with others and they're hauling along Expectations Baggage, well, I'll likely be skiing alone. Skiing is such a freeing thing for me. That baggage is not welcome.
Well said. I also enjoy skiing alone. I mean with the right friend it could be nice, but I find when I am alone I can really tune in to being present.

Especially this year when the things I would normally enjoy with someone are crossed off due to Covid, it will be even more alone time - even on the lifts.
It will be what it will be and be fine :smile:

OP, for me I do visualizations before the season and move my body/legs/feet in ways to bring back memories and watch quality youtubes with favorite teachers. Of course also squats and training as much as I can. And as to bunny slopes OP - sorry you would have anyone making fun of you for that. Enjoy them, I say. :smile:
 
Last edited:

AJM

Certified Ski Diva
#15
Yup, the first day jitters are a real thing ...... every time I think "how do you do this skiing thing again ??" then a couple of runs in it all comes back, have a wonderful season x
 
#16
This season it’s been longer since we were skiing! I remember the fear in my second and third years, but last year (4th) I got back in the lift with more confidence.

I always start on a green trail. Every ski day. Having started to ski at 62, I need to feel out the conditions, figure out of my boots are tight enough, and just feel the trail beneath before I want a challenge.

So no! you’re certainly not alone!
 

NewEnglandSkier

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#17
I always wonder how the first day will go, but everything usually comes back quickly. I still start on a green just to get comfortable and to be able to work on different things and then progress to more challenging runs as I feel like it. Nothing wrong at all with starting off on something that you know is easy; try not to let others expectations affect how you warm yourself up--only you know what feels safe and comfortable to you. If the others want to start their season on a black and you don't want to, then just let them go and meet up with them later.
 

Peaheartsmama

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#18
I love the sentiments on this thread. I did my first day this season at Big snow yesterday. Just one short run over and over. The first couple runs were definitely just trying to find my ski legs again. It’s always so thrilling to feel that sliding sensation agin after being away for so long. I know it will take a few more visits to dial back into better technique but I think the most important thing is to be patient with yourself and get the mileage in. The more you do it the better it gets
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#19
I would echo those talking about expectations. I find that it's a balance - try to go into it with confidence and trust your body to remember what to do. If nothing else, your body will be more relaxed and sometimes that's half the battle. BUT - also, do something easy for your first runs. Not necessarily hit the easiest green run (but maybe it is that!), but something you were comfortable with as a warmup run last year, so you're not all confidence and no brains, so to speak... (We HAVE gone out and jumped right into a steep powder run for the first run of the year when the weather made it so that we just could not resist and even that, surprisingly enough, worked out just fine...) Don't be upset that you didn't remember everything you were working on in lessons last year or any of that. Don't focus on trying to keep up with anyone else, or even ski the same slope as everyone else if it comes to that. Just have a nice reasonable goal of safely making it down a slope that you were comfortable on last year. Visualize that happening and go and do it.

I do get having those negative thoughts that you've forgotten everything. But in my experience, even after knee surgeries, after long breaks - you've got the muscle memory in there somewhere of something you were comfortable doing before. Try to relax and set yourself up for success and it's easier to find.
 

BMR

Certified Ski Diva
#20
Thanks everyone for the encouragement! I do feel better knowing it is normal to be a bit nervous even for the experienced divas. My husbands seems immune, but then again, he is a guy :smile:

I also find that the lighting early-season is really difficult
Ah! So that's been my problem all along? :becky::wink:

if you're curling your toes, STOP, regroup and start over
Wow, you know, I never even paid attention to that. I don't know if I am doing it, but I probably am if I am nervous. Thanks for the tip.

watch quality youtubes with favorite teachers. Of course also squats and training as much as I can
Yes, love watching youtube videos as a reminder. I watch them every night before skiing just to get ready for the day. As far as training and squats, that's not the problem. I work out every single day and am quite fit. The goal is to remember to NOT work out my quads on the slopes :wink:
 

Staff online

Members Online