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Powder hacks?

Mudgirl630

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
100%! Plenty of people prefer skinnier skis for skiing in all conditions…everyone should ski what they like on the slopes.

Since this thread is about “powder hacks” I will say add that if you’ve (you generally…not Mudgirl specifically) never tried a true powder ski…if might be what you’re looking for to get over that hump. I’m not condoning that “equipment will fix everything”, but using the tool designed for the job will help move things in the right direction.
Absolutely.
I just got rid of my Volkl 100Eight. I will look for another pair that is just below that width.
All I am saying is whatever works for you is great and whatever you want to try, knock your socks off!
 

snoWYmonkey

Angel Diva
@marzNC that slide behind you in the third shot is why we all need to hug or buy a ski patroller lunch!
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
@marzNC that slide behind you in the third shot is why we all need to hug or buy a ski patroller lunch!
:thumbsup:

That traverse at Alta rarely opens right after a storm ends. Access is off Rock 'N Roll. Usually takes 2-3 days before Castle Apron and Devil's Castle opens. I enjoy watching ski patrollers work on East Castle when riding the Supreme lift. Takes a lot of hiking to get up there to do their work.
 

Elizabeth.I

Certified Ski Diva
For sure fatter skis, lots of rocker, softer tips (normal for most pow skis anyway), twin tipped to make releasing from turns easier.

When skiing really deep pow, some people get backseat to get there tips up. Try and stay in a nice, centered position and dorsiflex your ankles (lift your toes up). Don't know if that counts as proper technique but it helps me avoid tip dive while also staying well balanced on my skis. Additionally, what you want to do is wait until you feel the skis plane up in the snow before making your first turn. If you turn too early, your skis are bogged down in the snow and turning is hard. Also, ski faster than you would normally, that helps the float too!
 

NWSkiGirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Does anyone have any tips to make powder skiing easier, outside of actual practice in it? I know I know, there are usually no short cuts to good technique.. but it’s also really hard to get the hang of powder technique in New England. I go out in it as much as I can, and I absolutely exhaust myself trying to ski it every time, and I feel no further along in learning how to ski it each time. I’m always so excited for a powder day, but I’m pretty darn miserable in over probably 10 inches of snow when I actually get in it truth be told. 6 or 8 inches, yay. Too much more and I’m struggling! I did take a lesson on a powder day at the very end of last season which was helpful at the time, and I’m hoping will translate this year but we’ll see.

So what is a girl to do?

Would fatter skis to float more help? My “powder” skis are in the high 90s, would going over 100 help? For example, I really really liked the Santa Ana 100 last season when I skied it, and it’s made me ponder if I’d like the 110 as much because I already have multiple skis in the high 90s too close to 100.

Any thoughts, tips, or tricks besides the whole don’t turn as much, go straighter, be more balanced than forward, stay on steeper runs, etc. I’d really like to build my confidence in this area this season. Are there things I could work on outside of powder to help in it? Last year my focus was bumps and trees, and I’ll be continuing that as much as possible this year as well, but I really want to work on this when the occasion arises which usually isn’t often here.
I find the skis make a huge difference. I think you need at least a 100 waist, and a light ski with lots of rocker. I've been out there totally sinking in my 84 Volkl Yumis, and having fun in my heavy 101 Volkl Auras. But I really love my Sheeva 10s, which have a 102 waist. Lots of rocker, and they are very light! They're confidence inspiring off piste and do pretty well on the groomers as well. I tested the Sheeva 104s too and liked them (but they're discontinued). Otherwise I've never tried wider skis, but I'd like to!

I don't think most of us get as much time as we'd like in powder, sadly. At least up here in the PNW. So skiing the very deep will probably never be in my future! lol I know I will probably never get really good at it.

You could take a couple of lessons and learn a lot, I'm sure! I got some great tips from a few ski instructors. My most recent tip was not to turn as if I'm carving a turn, which I hadn't even realized I was doing as it got steeper. Sometimes you need some real world feedback as you may be lacking awareness. But I think you already mentioned that tip above. Multi day all girl ski camps are so fun too!

The snow also makes a huge difference. Usually I can tell it's bad when I see everyone else buried around me too!

Thanks for posting - this really makes me want to ski again!
 

santacruz skier

Angel Diva
I find the skis make a huge difference. I think you need at least a 100 waist, and a light ski with lots of rocker. I've been out there totally sinking in my 84 Volkl Yumis, and having fun in my heavy 101 Volkl Auras. But I really love my Sheeva 10s, which have a 102 waist. Lots of rocker, and they are very light! They're confidence inspiring off piste and do pretty well on the groomers as well. I tested the Sheeva 104s too and liked them (but they're discontinued). Otherwise I've never tried wider skis, but I'd like to!

I don't think most of us get as much time as we'd like in powder, sadly. At least up here in the PNW. So skiing the very deep will probably never be in my future! lol I know I will probably never get really good at it.

You could take a couple of lessons and learn a lot, I'm sure! I got some great tips from a few ski instructors. My most recent tip was not to turn as if I'm carving a turn, which I hadn't even realized I was doing as it got steeper. Sometimes you need some real world feedback as you may be lacking awareness. But I think you already mentioned that tip above. Multi day all girl ski camps are so fun too!

The snow also makes a huge difference. Usually I can tell it's bad when I see everyone else buried around me too!

Thanks for posting - this really makes me want to ski again!
Can't wait to test out my new Sheeva 10's in Tahoe !
 

Elizabeth.I

Certified Ski Diva
While it's not necessary, I think it's helpful...especially for people that are learning to ski powder for the first time, or someone that has tried it and struggles with the up/down, floaty, hoppy movements. This is in the same way someone learning to carve will find it easier to learn to carve if they have a proper frontside oriented ski. Yes, people CAN learn to carve on a wider ski, but why make it harder on yourself? Learning to ski powder is the same thing...a wide, rockered ski is going to make all of the movements easier to learn.
Exactly!! Just because you can technically ski pow on skinny skis doesn't mean it's the best way to do it! I've skied 45cm fresh on both 98mms and 116mms and I can tell you, it's way easier and more fun on the 116s!
 

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