• Women skiers, this is the place for you -- an online community without the male-orientation you'll find in conventional ski magazines and internet ski forums. At TheSkiDiva.com, you can connect with other women to talk about skiing in a way that you can relate to, about things that you find of interest. Be sure to join our community to participate (women only, please!). Registration is fast and simple. Just be sure to add [email protected] to your address book so your registration activation emails won't be routed as spam. And please give careful consideration to your user name -- it will not be changed once your registration is confirmed.

Newbie

Tillygoesskiing

Diva in Training
So, finally booked a trip to real Scottish snow! First backcountry two day course is in January.

Any tips/essential gear for a complete newbie?

going to keep heading to my local dry slope till the season comes around here!

thanks
 

AJM

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Have fun !! I would imagine that whoever is running the course would have a list of essential equipment but over here in NZ it would generally consist of your ski's, skins etc plus tranceiver, shovel, probe ...... but as I said usually the organisers of the course would send out a list. There's others who are waaaay more experienced than me who will hopefully chime in .
 

Elizabeth.I

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
So, finally booked a trip to real Scottish snow! First backcountry two day course is in January.

Any tips/essential gear for a complete newbie?

going to keep heading to my local dry slope till the season comes around here!

thanks
That's super cool! Probably ignorant of me, but I didn't realize there were actually skiing opportunities in Scotland!

AJM is probably right in that they will supply you with the critical gear (skis, skins, boots, shovel/beacon/probe). One thing that's really important with backcountry skiing is layering. Moisture management is key, de-layer if you're starting to feel the sweat work up, and if you're stopping for a bit (transition), immediately layer up again before getting cold. I can understand if you don't want to buy yourself a whole new outwear kit for this, but what I like to use is a thin merino baselayer (lighter than what I use resort skiing), light midlayer (Patagonia nanopuff), midweight puffy (just waiting to receive my Rab infinity microlight jacket), and my arcteryx shell (not insulated). I also carry a synthetic sweater, which I typically only use when it's frigid. My ski pants are also a gortex shell with no insulation. Between all those things, I can pretty effectively manage my temperature with various combinations depending on the weather. It's my personal belief that "starting cold" is overrated. Just start warm and delayer 5 mins into the trip. Takes like 2 seconds to de-layer and you aren't uncomfortable!

I like to wear a toque (on uphill) and a buff (neck tube) and I have uphill gloves and downhill mitts. You're hands will get hot working hard on the uphill, so the uphill gloves are typically lighter. I also prefer the gloves to mitts for dexterity for transitions etc. My hands are super cold in general though, so i use mitts for the downhill.

It is not necessary by any means since you're doing a course and they'll give you tips, but if you're curious, there are youtube videos showing recommended skinning technique and how to do kick turns. There is a bit of an art to it so you don't slide backwards when skinning uphill. If (for some reason) you have to go downhill a bit with skins on, remember your heels aren't attached, try and stay centred, and keep your knees soft. Know that the skins will slow you down when you get on flat part so don't get forward.

Another thing to note is that your water might freeze or become really cold. When you are cold, it's hard to drink enough cold water to hydrate yourself. I know this sounds unappealing, but I like to take warm water in a thermos to drink. The water not being cold helps me drink enough. Some people like taking tea instead.

Hope that helps!
 

GuloGal

Certified Ski Diva
So, finally booked a trip to real Scottish snow! First backcountry two day course is in January.

Any tips/essential gear for a complete newbie?

going to keep heading to my local dry slope till the season comes around here!

thanks
My biggest one is bring all sort of types of gloves/mitts. Super thin gloves, fleece gloves, mid weight gloves, and super warm mitts. Having cold hands makes me cranky, and managing your moisture there is key. I probably change my gloves 3-7 times every day out depending on the temperature. My boyfriend has 4 pairs of the same mid weight gloves he swaps out as they get soaked. I know Scotland can be pretty windy and damp, so this is probably crucial for you too!
 

Latest posts

Members online

No members online now.

Forum statistics

Threads
26,148
Messages
495,769
Members
8,442
Latest member
SkiSarah
Top