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Help Needed: My New Skis are Miserable

What do you think?

  • Sell the Skis

    Votes: 5 71.4%
  • Keep the Skis

    Votes: 2 28.6%

  • Total voters
    7

CrystalRose

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#1
My first day out was no fun at all! I will leave out the play by play (even though I'm dying to vent about it) and get to the point.

I bought a pair of skis and I think they are too long for me at this stage. I was crossing tips all day. At the end of last season I was skiing mostly parallel and could hockey stop. Yesterday I was in a wedge mostly, couldn't hockey stop, or really even turn. I felt as if I was fighting them all day. I was so miserable and discouraged. Thought about renting on the hill but didn't want pay for the half day of use.

I called it early and just went home. My first day on skis wasn't as bad as yesterday. Maybe it's not the length but the ski in general? Regardless, I'm going to look at getting a season rental. There's no way I'm getting back on those things.

So should I:

1. Sell the skis while they are still in pretty good condition (though I nicked them a little from all the tip crossing) and not another year older.

or

2. Keep them and wait until I progress into them.

Stats:
Skis: 2016 Blizzard Cheyenne 170cm
Height, weight: 6'0" 165lbs
Previous Rentals: K2 Amp Strike 153cm
 
Last edited:

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
#2
Keep them and get some lessons. Yes they are longer, but they are different too. The K2's were beginner skis with only a tip rocker. The Cheyennes have tip and tail rocker. The Cheyenne's are more of a performance ski than the K2's. In fact the K2's were probably too short. I ski 161 with tip rocker and I'm only 5'4.
 

Powgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#3
I am no expert here, but it sounds like you might be in the backseat a bit...and not transferring your weight to and over the new downhill ski...I had this problem for a bit!

It takes some time to adjust to a new ski...in the meantime, I would practice getting forward and centered over that downhill ski on easier terrain...start transferring your weight in the beginning of your turn...if that makes sense...and master that hockey stop pronto!
 
#4
Yesterday I was in a wedge mostly, couldn't hockey stop, or really even turn.
That sounds pretty dire, beyond just not liking the skis. I'm skeptical that a ski a bit too long or a little too advanced could make it impossible for you to hockey stop or turn. It's harder and more tiring for me to ski on skis that are too much for me, but I don't find it impossible to perform basic maneuvers.

We've had some threads here about how new skis can be defective, or skis can have a bad tune, making basic ski moves difficult to impossible. I had a bad tune once that made skiing impossible. Imagine a newborn foal trying to stand. That was me, on my skis I knew and loved. I literally couldn't ski them. So first, I'd try taking them to a shop and asking them to check them out.

Or--are these rockered skis that you are trying to ski on hardpack? My last skis (Blizzard Black Pearls) gave me a very hard time on firmer surfaces--I was crossing or knocking tips constantly, and could NOT get forward enough to make it stop. Finally an instructor said to me, don't ski rockered skis on firmer surfaces. Those skis want snow. And I LOVE them on powder days--I still consider them my powder ski, and I have no issues whatsoever in the snow. I now ski Head Total Joy on firmer days and don't have any tips-crossing issues.
 

bounceswoosh

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#6
Couple of things.

One, @Christy is right - it could be the tune on the new skis. I have heard some horror stories, so I always bring my skis to my favorite tech for evaluation. Sometimes they're great, but sometimes they're not. Certain brands have reputations

Two, I have actually had an issue with skis too long causing me to cross my tips. The skis were powder skis, long, heavy, and very fat - and as I got tired on powder days, my bad habits would come out in force, particularly in failing to use my inside leg appropriately. I often tend to lift my inside leg out of the way rather than skiing properly, and when you combine that with getting tired because of skiing powder with heavy skis, well, I would cross my tips because my inside ski was in the way.

So it would be worth looking at whether you're initiating turns using both skis simultaneously, or whether the inside ski is just kind of going wherever while you focus on your outside ski.
 

WaterGirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#7
@CrystalRose I believe you have new boots as well? If so you are dealing with two variables - perhaps a more upright Boot and a different type of ski. Agree could be tune, or maybe mount point or just the fact that the skis are longer and different than what you were used to.

If you search the forums there is a similar thread posted about the Cheyenne by another diva.

Besides having the skis looked at for tune etc could you get back on the old pair you had or something similar to make sure your boots are not part of the equation?
 

CrystalRose

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#8
I am no expert here, but it sounds like you might be in the backseat a bit...and not transferring your weight to and over the new downhill ski...I had this problem for a bit!

It takes some time to adjust to a new ski...in the meantime, I would practice getting forward and centered over that downhill ski on easier terrain...start transferring your weight in the beginning of your turn...if that makes sense...and master that hockey stop pronto!
I'm sure that I'm in the back seat a lot. I made a conscious effort to get as far forward as I could, hands in front, and pressuring my boots. I felt it did very little for control. just made me stiff and robotic. This is all on me of course, I can't blame the skis for my bad technique.

Or--are these rockered skis that you are trying to ski on hardpack? My last skis (Blizzard Black Pearls) gave me a very hard time on firmer surfaces--I was crossing or knocking tips constantly, and could NOT get forward enough to make it stop. Finally an instructor said to me, don't ski rockered skis on firmer surfaces. Those skis want snow. And I LOVE them on powder days--I still consider them my powder ski, and I have no issues whatsoever in the snow. I now ski Head Total Joy on firmer days and don't have any tips-crossing issues.
You could say these are the baby sister to the Black Pearl, so yes rockered tips and tails. Yesterday was firm. It was man made snow. No natural snow in the foreseeable future for Southern California.

Two, I have actually had an issue with skis too long causing me to cross my tips. The skis were powder skis, long, heavy, and very fat - and as I got tired on powder days, my bad habits would come out in force, particularly in failing to use my inside leg appropriately. I often tend to lift my inside leg out of the way rather than skiing properly, and when you combine that with getting tired because of skiing powder with heavy skis, well, I would cross my tips because my inside ski was in the way.

So it would be worth looking at whether you're initiating turns using both skis simultaneously, or whether the inside ski is just kind of going wherever while you focus on your outside ski.
Ha! Were you there yesterday? I tried to think about lightening the inside ski to let the inside ski come in on it's own. It never did. I got so frustrated that I would just lift the inside leg up off the snow and ski on the downhill ski. I know this is an actual drill but I don't want to do it all day!

But I know that sometimes I'm so focused on the downhill ski I will forget the inside one and it's doing it's own thing.
 

CrystalRose

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#9
@CrystalRose I believe you have new boots as well? If so you are dealing with two variables - perhaps a more upright Boot and a different type of ski. Agree could be tune, or maybe mount point or just the fact that the skis are longer and different than what you were used to.

If you search the forums there is a similar thread posted about the Cheyenne by another diva.

Besides having the skis looked at for tune etc could you get back on the old pair you had or something similar to make sure your boots are not part of the equation?
Yes new boots as well. They have a 15 degree lean. Is that upright? Actually they were ok. I lost circulation a few times but it wasn't troubling because they came back to life if I took my feet out for a few minutes. I'm going to ski them a few times before I run back to the fitter for that though.

So is the verdict check the tune and keep them? I took them to a shop to have them waxed and detune the tips and tails. IDK if they looked at anything besides that.
 

bounceswoosh

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#10
I'm sure that I'm in the back seat a lot. I made a conscious effort to get as far forward as I could, hands in front, and pressuring my boots. I felt it did very little for control. just made me stiff and robotic. This is all on me of course, I can't blame the skis for my bad technique.
Ha! Were you there yesterday? I tried to think about lightening the inside ski to let the inside ski come in on it's own. It never did. I got so frustrated that I would just lift the inside leg up off the snow and ski on the downhill ski. I know this is an actual drill but I don't want to do it all day!
My dear. Between these two posts, I think you need a lesson! And I understand about feeling stiff and robotic. I think you saw my recent post in the "revelations" thread. Sometimes it's a matter of working through the robotic feelings until the new feelings are "normal." Sometimes it's a different lesson entirely.

There's actually such a thing as a skier getting too far forward. It's rare, but it can happen. I can't say whether that's the case for you. But I think it may be more of a matter of diving into the details. Pressuring your boots - there's a difference between putting pressure into the boot at the right time, and just constantly leaning into your boot. There's a difference between pressuring forward and pressuring diagonally. Stuff like that ...

Yes new boots as well. They have a 15 degree lean. Is that upright?
That's actually a tad aggressive IMO. But it depends totally on your biomechanics.


I would get the skis tuned and see if they ski better before making any sale decisions. Do you still have the old skis?
 

Obrules15

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#11
My biggest concern is that for you on those skis, skiing was not fun. I think everyone is right about other things to think about but when you are just learning a 17cm jump in ski length is difficult to deal with regardless of whether it's "right".

If you waste all season struggling it will color your perception of skiing to the point where I worry you might not want to continue. That ski at your height and weight is probably good for you, you just may not be ready to ski it yet.

I would keep the ski and get a season rental at about 158cm, work with that a while, trade up to a 165cm and then up to your 170's. I'd definitely wait until you become comfortable on each longer length.

IMHO skiing at your level should be more about having fun than using the "right" ski and recognizing that sometimes you have to make a few compromises. With that being said my most miserable day ever was in new boots on new longer skis, it can definitely be rough.
 

CrystalRose

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#12
I know I'm still a beginner. I know I still need a lot of lessons too but I don't want a lesson every time I step on the hill! I want it to be fun too.

Nope on the old skis, they were rentals. I feel like I should just rent some skis and see what the result will be. It could very well be "It's not that I can't ski the Cheyennes, but I can't ski and the Cheyennes prove it!" But if that's the case I should be on something more forgiving of my noobness.

Thank you @Obrules15! You captured my thought process and concern. This is technically my 1st season where I will get in consistent ski time. Yesterday was so bad that I questioned why am I even doing this? I've spent so much money on equipment and a pass and drove 2 hours each way (when I hate driving and the winding roads make me carsick even as the driver) just to hate it. It made me feel like I was crazy to pursue this. Was last season just a fluke? Then it was thrilling and fun. Yesterday I felt out of control and scared on runs that I would've crushed.
 
#13
So is the verdict check the tune and keep them?

Okay, so if you have new boots as well, you're going to have to break things down to see what the culprit might be. Be methodical. Ski the old rental skis with the new boots and see if you have issues. If not, move on to the tune. If that's all good, then you may have narrowed it down to the skis. It's a good idea to take a lesson, but I'd try to get someone well versed in equipment issues. I've met too many instructors at this point that don't seem to believe equipment is ever the issue, which I think is such BS. It also could be interesting to ski your skis in snow and see if that makes a difference, like it did for me. But again, I could at least turn and stop in my old too-long rockered skis.
 

bounceswoosh

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#14
I know I'm still a beginner. I know I still need a lot of lessons too but I don't want a lesson every time I step on the hill! I want it to be fun too.
I'll argue that if you're not having fun in the lesson, you have the wrong instructor! (For you.) .But I know what you mean. I am definitely not suggesting that you should keep the skis and torture yourself with lessons. Just a few things you said make me think you could see some big gains rapidly. But you know ... I'm a tortured soul who spends my life taking ski lessons and agonizing about technical perfection, who unfortunately is close enough to good skiing to know what I'm lacking - you might not want to be that person!
 
#15
I agree with what others have been saying - it seems you should rent a familiar ski and get used to the boots on that. Then, maybe start exchanging the rental skis for ones a little longer, as @Obrules15 suggested. Solve one problem at a time! Someone suggested to another Diva to find an instructor who is also a bootfitter - it does seem like a lesson from someone with an equipment focus could be enormously helpful. Maybe even bring both the shorter rentals and the Cheyennes - could be a great consultation.

You can decide to sell them later, if they are tuned right but just don't work for you. It was fun last year; it will be fun again! I promise!
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#17
It won’t hurt to have a shop put a straight edge on the base of the skis and check them. Sometimes, there is an easy answer. I also recommend renting the same length skis as last season and eliminating the boots as the problem. It will work itself out as you warm up during the season. We’re you skiing Miracle Mile, Westridge, or Summit Run?
 

Obrules15

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#18
I know I'm still a beginner. I know I still need a lot of lessons too but I don't want a lesson every time I step on the hill! I want it to be fun too.

Nope on the old skis, they were rentals. I feel like I should just rent some skis and see what the result will be. It could very well be "It's not that I can't ski the Cheyennes, but I can't ski and the Cheyennes prove it!" But if that's the case I should be on something more forgiving of my noobness.

Thank you @Obrules15! You captured my thought process and concern. This is technically my 1st season where I will get in consistent ski time. Yesterday was so bad that I questioned why am I even doing this? I've spent so much money on equipment and a pass and drove 2 hours each way (when I hate driving and the winding roads make me carsick even as the driver) just to hate it. It made me feel like I was crazy to pursue this. Was last season just a fluke? Then it was thrilling and fun. Yesterday I felt out of control and scared on runs that I would've crushed.
First few days of the season are difficult (I have seven days on snow this year but keep demoting myself to the bunny hill because "things" aren't right.) so after yesterdays' adventures maybe rent something in the 150-152 range like you had last year so you can get your groove back. Start on the bunny hill until you regain your confidence and you'll be back to feeling like a rock star in no time.
 

CrystalRose

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#19
That describes exactly how I felt on them. Hmmm. But she is way more advanced than I am and she ended up getting rid of them!

It won’t hurt to have a shop put a straight edge on the base of the skis and check them. Sometimes, there is an easy answer. I also recommend renting the same length skis as last season and eliminating the boots as the problem. It will work itself out as you warm up during the season. We’re you skiing Miracle Mile, Westridge, or Summit Run?
I had Goldsmith's put a straight edge on them when I had them put on the bindings. They said they were was fine but I could get a second opinion.

As for trails, none of those!!! The bunny hill at Snow Summit (Chair 8) and then the bunny hill at Big Bear under Chair 6 then Easy Street from Chair 7. Scared the whole time and I fell so much SMH. I had pride that I only fell twice my first day on skis both times deloading from the chair. Yesterday I lost count :laughter:!
 

TracyMcP

Certified Ski Diva
#20
I had a bad tune once. Could not buy a turn. It was terrible. I was also gifted a pair of skis that I cannot stand. I also feel like they are way too long.
My daily skis, Nordica Belle 88’s are a dream. Skis can make a huge difference.
 

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