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Makeup for workouts

RachelV

Administrator
Staff member
It's a waste of money-I'm skin type 4, I don't burn so I'd only use it because supposedly "everyone needs it". It impedes Vitamin D conversion and levels are a concern for me.

Makes no sense to buy sunscreen to prevent something I'm at super low risk for and be forced to turn around and have to buy vitamin d to prevent things I'm at super high risk for. I'm lucky enough to be able to enjoy the sun without slathering on chemicals, so I do.

Outside just published an article about this was super interesting: https://www.outsideonline.com/2380751/sunscreen-sun-exposure-skin-cancer-science

(Summary: you're probably right ;) )
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
Unless i'm wearing a costume or going to a seriously formal event, my idea of makeup is mascara and eyebrow tint. And yes, I wear it to the gym or skiing or whatever. It's not affecting my pores when I sweat and doesn't just rub off. If i'm outdoors, I add a thick type of sunscreen that helps avoid windburn too.
 

Powgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Yes, this exactly! I'm really impressed by that article. It's taken me years, countless studies and much rumination and they sum it up excellently in a few pages!

It is a controversial...I have been weighing both sides for a few years now, and have landed on the side of sunscreen...skin cancer has affected a lot of people I know...at a minimum, it can be disfiguring...and those that don't wear it look 10 years older than they are. I garden for a living and still get quite tan, but I don't want to ever burn. So, I slather on the mineral SPF, wear hats and sunglasses.

Because of this, my vitamin D levels are on the lowish side. My doctor is not as worried as he used to be because there is some new potential evidence that too much D can cause health problems.
 

Abbi

Angel Diva
O
It's a waste of money-I'm skin type 4, I don't burn so I'd only use it because supposedly "everyone needs it". It impedes Vitamin D conversion and levels are a concern for me.

Makes no sense to buy sunscreen to prevent something I'm at super low risk for and be forced to turn around and have to buy vitamin d to prevent things I'm at super high risk for. I'm lucky enough to be able to enjoy the sun without slathering on chemicals, so I do.

OK, that makes perfect sense. I do allow limited sun time in the summer to allow for natural Vitamin D production. If I had the option to skip sunscreen the rest of the time, I absolutely would! But it’s one thing versus another and I need to live in this skin for the rest of my life! Thank you for explaining! :smile:
 

Obrules15

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
It is a controversial...I have been weighing both sides for a few years now, and have landed on the side of sunscreen...skin cancer has affected a lot of people I know...at a minimum, it can be disfiguring...and those that don't wear it look 10 years older than they are. I garden for a living and still get quite tan, but I don't want to ever burn. So, I slather on the mineral SPF, wear hats and sunglasses.

Because of this, my vitamin D levels are on the lowish side. My doctor is not as worried as he used to be because there is some new potential evidence that too much D can cause health problems.
Those problematic Vitamin D levels are likely from supplements, not sun and if you compare the health risks of too much vs too little they are not really equivalent. But, they should also be individualized to personal risk. I am black, I have a vanishingly low risk of skin cancer, and low risk of the things associated with high Vit d levels, but sky high risk of things associated with low vitamin d levels. Therefore lots of sun is likely good for me.

One of my main points is that each of these things are very specific to the individual so we have to be aware of our own vulnerabilities and make our decisions based on personal risk profiles. You sound like less sun is better for you. But do be aware that many of the worst skin cancers are associated with severity of burns in CHILDHOOD. So we may be guilty of inappropriately extrapolating risk.

Ultimately (IMHO) it's like a lot of things in medicine. There are always two sides to every story and it's about figuring out where you fall on the spectrum. The narrative we've been taught is too much sun is bad, therefore none is good. That makes no sense. Honestly, modern medicine is often just not very thoughtful. We're not like that to be malignant, it's just difficult to understand and implement things on a population level so we try to simplify things and somehow we simplify things a little too much.

I didn't comment with the intention of changing anyone's sunscreen use (although one of my favorite recent headlines is "Is sunscreen the new margarine") but it doesn't hurt anyone to be aware and not be mislead by industry who's only interested in trying sell you something and make a profit.
 

Powgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Thank you for this @Obrules15 ...your information is good!

I spend about 7 hours a day, 5 days a week, 10 months a year, in the direct Colorado sun, so I am concerned about my sun exposure. I am not the norm...I do believe sunshine is good for us!
 

newboots

Angel Diva
I never wear any makeup except a little color for my disappearing eyebrows and my bright red lipstick.

Ever since I let my prematurely gray hair grow out, I’ve been in love with red lipstick. It didn’t work when I was a brunette, nor could I wear the colors I do now (royal blue, purple, fuschia, and certainly red!).

Now that I live in Vermont, where people often wear jeans and flannel to work, the lipstick sometimes seems a bit much. But mostly, I wear it because it makes me happy. No foundation or the rest of it, though. Sunscreen when I’m outdoors for a long time.
 

VickiK

Angel Diva
Does anyone use one that’s really really light coverage and not cakey or drying?
I like the tinted moisturizer by Dermologica, I use the medium tone. Prefer it to Bobbi Brown, but that one's ok too.
 

GaSkier

Certified Ski Diva
Yes, this exactly! I'm really impressed by that article. It's taken me years, countless studies and much rumination and they sum it up excellently in a few pages!
What a great article containing real science. One of the docs in the article is quoted as saying that blood pressure meds (and I'm paraphrasing) are benign with few side effects. Watching a couple of older relatives go through months of trying to find a blood pressure med without life altering side effects has been sobering. Not sure I agree with that particular physician.
My mother-in-law used a dermatologist that recommended she not go outside uncovered (hat, long pants and sleeves, sunscreen) between 9 AM and 4 PM regardless of the time of year or whether or not the sun was out. She also recommended that she wear gloves while driving because 'the windshield acts as a magnifier for the sun'. I laughed at that because my 90 lb southern lady mother-in-law definitely did not drive a semi for a living, so she didn't spend much time behind the wheel.
I always thought it was a bit excessive and overkill. She also had extremely low vitamin D AND high blood pressure (one of her blood pressure meds had a warning to 'avoid direct exposure to sunlight'). I always tried to convince her that a bit of sunshine would go a long way for her health, but to no avail. And the dermatologist sold her incredibly expensive sunscreen. I have to admit, though, her skin did look good. LOL!

So, sun is good, but not so much that you burn. Sunscreen is good, but not if used to avoid all sunlight exposure. All things in moderation?
 

GaSkier

Certified Ski Diva
Those problematic Vitamin D levels are likely from supplements, not sun and if you compare the health risks of too much vs too little they are not really equivalent. But, they should also be individualized to personal risk. I am black, I have a vanishingly low risk of skin cancer, and low risk of the things associated with high Vit d levels, but sky high risk of things associated with low vitamin d levels. Therefore lots of sun is likely good for me.

One of my main points is that each of these things are very specific to the individual so we have to be aware of our own vulnerabilities and make our decisions based on personal risk profiles. You sound like less sun is better for you. But do be aware that many of the worst skin cancers are associated with severity of burns in CHILDHOOD. So we may be guilty of inappropriately extrapolating risk.

Ultimately (IMHO) it's like a lot of things in medicine. There are always two sides to every story and it's about figuring out where you fall on the spectrum. The narrative we've been taught is too much sun is bad, therefore none is good. That makes no sense. Honestly, modern medicine is often just not very thoughtful. We're not like that to be malignant, it's just difficult to understand and implement things on a population level so we try to simplify things and somehow we simplify things a little too much.

I didn't comment with the intention of changing anyone's sunscreen use (although one of my favorite recent headlines is "Is sunscreen the new margarine") but it doesn't hurt anyone to be aware and not be mislead by industry who's only interested in trying sell you something and make a profit.
Thoughtful post. Thank you.
 

snowysnow

Certified Ski Diva
Custom Cover Drops by Cover FX. Adds pigment to basically anything -- moisturizer, facial oils, aloe vera gel.. you name it. And you can customize the coverage by using 1, 2 or 3+ drops.

I don't wear any makeup when I ski, just a heavy moisturizer. But I'm about to ski with some people from work and I think I'm going to have to wear some! I just don't want to get any on the foam of my goggles or the inside of my clothes. It also seems silly because my face is (basically) completely covered!
 

heatherrrrz

Certified Ski Diva
I usually do make up when I'm not in a hurry, most days I just forgo it for work since I'm only wearing my glasses anyways. If I'm going to an amusement park, I'll wear tinted moisturizer with SPF unless I'm going to a water park then I just don't wear any at all. For ski, I don't wear any but apres ski I'll go full face after a nice hot shower.
 

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