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Question: Lunch Ideas?

SallyCat

Moderator
Staff member
#1
(I think I remember reading a thread on this, but I can't locate it, so apologies for resurrecting an old topic.)

I got myself really well set up with gear and passes this year, but I'm too broke to pay resort prices for food. Also, I don't like to take too much time away from skiing to eat, but I do get pretty hungry midday.

I'm terrible at meal planning; I get a free, awesome lunch at work every day, so I don't really ever have to plan that meal. I've found that Clif bars don't really cut it--they leave me hungry again pretty quickly. I'm great at the logistics of beer-sneaking, but pretty sad at actually feeding myself, evidently. :rolleyes:

What are your favorite ski day lunches that are little more exciting than peanut butter and jelly, but easy-ish to prepare?

At my home mountain, I can easily and quickly get to the car and am thinking of bringing my JetBoil and having a quick freeze-dried backpacking meal or making soup ahead of time and heating it up.

Thanks for any ideas!
 
#3
I bring cup o soups, my own tea bags and cups and use the Mts free hot water along w/my favorite PB&J's fruit, trail mix and of course some chocolate candy. I also usually have a clif bar or other protein bar in case we don't go in for lunch. Early season it gets dark early so we'll ski thru lunch and quit when the light goes flat.
 
#4
I'm a hearty soups person. Usually with a couple of cheese sticks followed by a brownie or cookie. I buy from a market at the mountain base village that has a really good hot bar with multiple soups and stews.

But if bringing from home, I like the idea of a thermos of leftovers or using hot water to rehydrate something from the food store. I find that cheese stays with me longer than the cliff bar type protein bars. And those individually wrapped sticks are very convenient pocket food.

The biggest issue for me is to make sure I get some calories and protein in - preferably something hot - but to make sure I do NOT eat too much! If I do, I get cold when I get back out on the slopes. I guess my body is too busy digesting at the expense of my extremities! I also pay attention to rehydrating, usually with a sports drink of some sort.

I'm out on the mountain every day and in some pretty darn cold weather. So finding that perfect balance has been key. Yes - refuel a bit and hydrate. But no - don't have a big slug of stuff or I will struggle in the afternoon.
 

Jenny

Angel Diva
#5
We're lazy. A ziploc with cheese sticks, pepperoni or some other protein (also in stick form:smile:) and a clif bar do it for us. Or we'll split a bowl of soup and have it with the other stuff if we need to warm up some. Once in a while we'll think ahead and have a hardboiled egg in there, too.

Oh, and we'll make sandwiches on the skinny bread, so it's kind of pre-smushed, just in case we fall on it.
 

Christy

Angel Diva
#7
Freeze-dried backpacking meals are actually pretty expensive, and they only taste edible-to-decent when you are actually in the backcountry. :smile: They also usually come in double servings. I like the thermos soups and stews idea. I would do that if my car was more accessible where I ski.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#8
Freeze-dried backpacking meals are actually pretty expensive, and they only taste edible-to-decent when you are actually in the backcountry. :smile: They also usually come in double servings. I like the thermos soups and stews idea. I would do that if my car was more accessible where I ski.
I agree - I think I could eat at the resort cafeteria for the price of those freeze dried meals. And I don't like most of them either.
 

socalgal

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#9
The majority of the time we pack a lunch and lots of snacks as well. This works because we are able to park close or if at a bigger mountain, we rent a locker. With a small kid in tow, breaks and snacks are a big deal. As to what we pack: hard boiled eggs (we have chickens so always have an abundance of eggs); trail mix, either our own medley or the ones from costco with the mnm's in them; cheese and hard salami seems to fill up nicely; fruit, whatever we have on hand; brown rice pilafs with a protein in a big Tupper ware It tastes fine cold, but it's usually still warm; chips or something else that is kinda junky and salty. I want to try more soups and stews this year. Lit's of water and maybe a gatorade
 

MsWax

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#11
We do lots of snack for the kids. They each get a clif bar and package of peanut butter crackers they carry with them, and we pack sandwiches with chips, applesauce, and cheese sticks for lunch. We usually splurge and pack vitamin water for DH and I, and juice boxes for the kids, because we otherwise don't drink enough water during the day.
 

SallyCat

Moderator
Staff member
#12
Great ideas!, Thanks!

I just remembered that I used to carry shelf-stable prosciutto and cheese and make sandwiches for lunch when I backpacked. I could keep that in my pocket and it would be delicious. (Wegmans: best supermarket ever. Affordable prosciutto)

Totally agree about freeze-dried meals. I usually make my own freezer-bag style with ramen and dried veggies or something similar.

But I really like the idea of a hearty soup.

because we otherwise don't drink enough water during the day.
I'm bad about that, too.
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
#13
I usually want something hot at lunch time but don't want too much. Sometimes a bowl of soup is enough. But always have protein bars in my pack. If I'm organized, may bring half a PB&J sandwich and/or a pre-packaged applesauce.
 

CarverJill

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#14
I LOVE getting a hot lunch at the resort but if I was trying to save money I'd do the hot leftovers in an insulated container as my #1. If I didn't have decent leftovers to bring I would opt for opening a can of soup and warming it ahead of time or bringing a tasty salad; not the healthy kind but the Mexican chopped type you get at the grocery store with the creamy dressing. I would add avocado, hard boiled egg and/or fried tofu to it. Yogurts are a good option as well. You can easily add quantity to a packed meal with things like cheddar popcorn, those huge puffed corns, peanut butter pretzels, or pepperoni and sliced cheese. Can you tell I pack a lot of lunches?

Does your mountain have a microwave? Some base lodges offer that. If so there are lots of relatively healthy and cheap frozen lunch options at the grocery store.

I love Wegmans too!
 

kiki

Angel Diva
#15
I have been thinking about this I'm glad someone brought it up.

I too want to spend less in the cafeteria this time round. I don't recall lockers there. The car park is not that close. I can bring a thin ham and cheese sandwich and a fruit and seed bar in my pocket, but what about water???

I've never skiid with a backpack, is that what you all do??
 

SallyCat

Moderator
Staff member
#16
Does your mountain have a microwave?
My mountain has such a strict "no outside food" policy that I think they would tackle you if you so much as tried to use your own teabag. But they don't care about the parking lot, so a thermos or camp stove may do the trick.

I've never skiid with a backpack, is that what you all do??
I would be scared to ski with a backpack because of the danger of getting snagged on the chairlift. But I was thinking one of those collapsible plastic water bottles could fit in my pocket.
 

marzNC

Angel Diva
#17
I have been thinking about this I'm glad someone brought it up.

I too want to spend less in the cafeteria this time round. I don't recall lockers there. The car park is not that close. I can bring a thin ham and cheese sandwich and a fruit and seed bar in my pocket, but what about water???

I've never skiid with a backpack, is that what you all do??
At destination resorts that have multiple bases and/or mid-mountain lodges, I usually use a small 11L Dakine backpack. One ski buddy uses a fanny pack. For water, he re-uses a small water plastic water bottle (6 oz?). Another ski friend swears by a Camelback but he's a big man and needs to hydrate every lift ride. I tried a Camelback and didn't like it.

I've been able to leave my boot bag somewhere in a base lodge for free pretty much anywhere I've gone in the last 7 seasons. The locals always know what works, especially the seniors who ski midweek. But always nice when a small mountain has a free boot bag check room.

There are a few backpacks made specifically for riding lifts. They flip to the front easily or are shaped so can sit back in the chair.
 

Jenny

Angel Diva
#19
I have been thinking about this I'm glad someone brought it up.

I too want to spend less in the cafeteria this time round. I don't recall lockers there. The car park is not that close. I can bring a thin ham and cheese sandwich and a fruit and seed bar in my pocket, but what about water???

I've never skiid with a backpack, is that what you all do??
I wear a tiny, tiny one when out west so that we can have water with us. Being from the Midwest, we're not used to the altitude or the distance we might be from a lodge and there are times I have been just gasping for water out in the middle of nowhere. (OK, it's still groomed, but still . . .) Mostly stuff is in our pockets.
 

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