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Live forever (or just a long time?)

marzNC

Angel Diva
#3
I noted that fasting is considered useful. Having been doing a variation of intermittent fasting for a few years, I tend to think that's true. Don't know how autophagy relates to sirtuins, but bottom line is that IF works for me (mid-60s).

Nov. 9, 2019, Outside Online
This Scientist Believes Aging Is Optional
In his new book, 'Lifespan,' celebrated scientist David Sinclair lays out exactly why we age—and why he thinks we don't have to
https://www.outsideonline.com/2404642/lifespan-david-sinclair-book-review
". . .​
Sinclair splits his time between the U.S. and Australia, running labs at Harvard Medical School and at the University of New South Wales. All of his research seeks to prove that aging is a problem we can solve—and figure out how to stop. He argues that we can slow down the aging process, and in some cases even reverse it, by putting our body through “healthy stressors” that increase NAD levels and promote sirtuin activity. The role of sirtuins in aging is now fairly well accepted, but the idea that we can reactivate them (and how best to do so) is still being worked out.​
Getting cold, working out hard, and going hungry every once in a while all engage what Sinclair calls our body’s survival circuit, wherein sirtuins tell cells to boost their defenses in order to keep the organism (you) alive. While Sinclair’s survival-circuit theory has yet to be proven in a trial setting, there’s plenty of research to suggest that exercise, cold exposure, and calorie reduction all help slow down the side effects of aging and stave off diseases associated with getting older. Fasting, in particular, has been well supported by other research: in various studies, both mice and yeast that were fed restricted diets live much longer than their well-fed cohorts. A two-year-long human experiment in the 1990s found that participants who had a restricted diet that left them hungry often had decreased blood pressure, blood-sugar levels, and cholesterol levels. Subsequent human studies found that decreasing calories by 12 percent slowed down biological aging based on changes in blood biomarkers.​
. . ."​
 

fgor

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#4
I know that my mother also finds intermittent fasting to be really useful for her overall energy levels and feelings of well being. She has a number of autoimmune issues and definitely finds that the IF has a positive systemic effect. I've been meaning to give it a proper go sometime.
 
#6
The problem with intermittent fasting is not eating! I am afraid in COVID-19 year missing that pleasure is taking too much away. I will fall back into a better frame of mind at some point!
Trust me, @Abbi, I intermittently fast and manage to stuff my face with plenty of delicious food. I just wait until the afternoon.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#8
I have a coworker who is very fit and tries every trendy crazy thing you hear about. He did the cold thing one winter and put an exercise bike outdoors and would spin in his underwear in the snow to cold train. (Something about "Joe Rogan said it's great") I don't remember all the details but he was sick a LOT that winter (and got teased endlessly about his life choices).

(Not that being cold equals germs but in guessing his body was extra stressed and more susceptible to every germ at the gym later....)

I don't doubt that some stressors are good for your body. But probably within reason. Hahaha
 
#10
I've found that the only way I can lose weight is intermittent fasting. But I don't fast, really. I skip breakfast. (I have been a staunch breakfast-eater all my life.)

The first two days I get hungry, but drink plenty of tea. After that, I don't feel like eating in the morning. The idea is to stop eating after dinner, and don't eat for 14-16 hours. Your body is forced to burn fat for fuel for a few hours every morning. Even if you stuff your face later in the day!
 
#11
I skip breakfast. (I have been a staunch breakfast-eater all my life.)
It definitely took a while to get out of the habit of eating breakfast. Maybe a couple of months?

Drinking more water at various times during the day was definitely helpful. That was one habit my parents had that I didn't develop. Still something I have to think about doing. My father didn't drink tea or coffee, just boiled water either warm or at room temperature. He lived to 95 and other than asthma that developed in his late 60s was quite healthy and active even in his 90s.
 
#13
I guess I've been intermittent fasting without realizing it nowadays. I eat dinner around 6:30-7pm most nights and since my morning schedule has shifted later working from home I haven't been eating breakfast until around 10-10:30am.

I'm intrigued by the hot water topic.. That is extremely unappealing to me for some reason, I like my water to be ice cold, but I do love to drink hot tea in the winter.
 
#14
I guess I've been intermittent fasting without realizing it nowadays. I eat dinner around 6:30-7pm most nights and since my morning schedule has shifted later working from home I haven't been eating breakfast until around 10-10:30am.

I'm intrigued by the hot water topic.. That is extremely unappealing to me for some reason, I like my water to be ice cold, but I do love to drink hot tea in the winter.
Not drinking ice cold drinks is somewhat cultural. It actually can be considered unhealthy to drink a cold drink during a meal in China. There are some family stories that go with that tradition. My father had developed a habit of drinking ice water when he was a grad student in Chicago. He was there for over 10 years, from 1934 to 1946. My parents met at the Univ. of Chicago and married in the U.S. When they went back to Shanghai in 1946, he asked for ice water when staying at her mother's house. Her family was pretty surprised and a little appalled. In 1995 I went to China with my husband and his older brother. We are all American-born Chinese. One dinner with their relatives was at the apartment of one of their aunts. The two of them asked for ice water. More than one of the older women made it quite clear that they believed drinking cold water would make them sick. Note that any water for drinking in China is either boiled and cooled, or from a bottle.

I tend to drink room temperature water or hot tea. Although I also drink iced tea or tea that's cooled to room temperature. Mostly the idea is to drink less fruit juices or fruit drinks or commercial ice tea that have a fair amount of sugar, which I like. I don't like soda or flavored water in general.

My mother drank tea of all kinds, as well as room temperature boiled water. I guess my father thought it wasn't worth the effort and didn't mind drinking plain hot water.
 
#15
Not drinking ice cold drinks is somewhat cultural. It actually can be considered unhealthy to drink a cold drink during a meal in China. There are some family stories that go with that tradition. My father had developed a habit of drinking ice water when he was a grad student in Chicago. He was there for over 10 years, from 1934 to 1946. My parents met at the Univ. of Chicago and married in the U.S. When they went back to Shanghai in 1946, he asked for ice water when staying at her mother's house. Her family was pretty surprised and a little appalled. In 1995 I went to China with my husband and his older brother. We are all American-born Chinese. One dinner with their relatives was at the apartment of one of their aunts. The two of them asked for ice water. More than one of the older women made it quite clear that they believed drinking cold water would make them sick. Note that any water for drinking in China is either boiled and cooled, or from a bottle.

I tend to drink room temperature water or hot tea. Although I also drink iced tea or tea that's cooled to room temperature. Mostly the idea is to drink less fruit juices or fruit drinks or commercial ice tea that have a fair amount of sugar, which I like. I don't like soda or flavored water in general.

My mother drank tea of all kinds, as well as room temperature boiled water. I guess my father thought it wasn't worth the effort and didn't mind drinking plain hot water.
Very interesting! I actually will drink room temperature water lately working at home, but this is mostly due to the fact that I'm a slow drinker and too lazy to add more ice when it melts at my desk. :smile:
 

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