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Leki Trigger S Ski Poles - Do they release when you crash?

lucy

Certified Ski Diva
#1
Hi All, I have the Leki Trigger S ski poles and love them for all of the reasons everyone else loves them. However, I also bought them because I thought they were supposed to release when I crashed. The straps on old ski poles were notorious for causing hand injuries and my thumbs are so important to me! My right thumb was dislocated in a bike wreck and well, it's never been the same since. So the entire purpose for me, was to buy a ski pole that was safer than using the old wrist strap ski pole to protect my digits. But I've owned them for a few years and the Leki Trigger S ski poles have never released. I'm beginning to wonder if they work. If you use the Leki Trigger S ski pole, have they ever released when they are supposed to release? Just wondering if I purchased a bad pair and I need to replace them. Thanks so much!
 

elemmac

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#3
So the entire purpose for me, was to buy a ski pole that was safer than using the old wrist strap ski pole to protect my digits. But I've owned them for a few years and the Leki Trigger S ski poles have never released. I'm beginning to wonder if they work. If you use the Leki Trigger S ski pole, have they ever released when they are supposed to release?
I think they'll only release if you pull/twist/yank them in certain directions...but yes, they are supposed to. And I believe they need to be pulled pretty hard in order for them to release on their own.

I've been skiing with them for a year (this season). I have had them release in a crash, but it may have been from something (i.e. my hand or the snow) hitting the top and making it release. It's hard to tell what the reason for the release was.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#4
They are supposed to release, yes. I"ve not had mine release, but I've been with others who have.
 

Susan L

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#5
They are supposed to but you have to yank hard, or at least that’s what the sales did to show me. Mine did not release when I fell a few weeks ago - good that I did not have to hike up a black tree run to retrieve my poles but I did twist my thumb and wrist because it did not release.
 

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#6
I crashed today- pretty hard- and had to spin myself around to get my feet downhill. One pole released and the other didn’t.
 

RhodySkiBum

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#7
I bought them after I broke my hand with the old-fashioned poles with hand grips - I've fallen (plenty) but never had them release. But I have also never injured my hand or wrist!

I love them so far :-)3
 

mahgnillig

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#8
I've only ever had one pole release once... I was skiing through some trees and the pole got lodged into something under the surface and stuck there while I kept going. It was a weird twisting, yanking maneuver that made it release. Hasn't happened since...
 

lucy

Certified Ski Diva
#9
Thanks so much for the feedback!

So yes, they are supposed to release but it sounds like it takes an enormous amount of twisting pressure to make it happen. It also doesn't sound like the Trigger S ski pole is any safer for fingers and thumbs than the old fashion wrist straps because it takes so much force to cause a release. That point worries me, on the other hand, it would probably help if I stopped trying to use my ski pole as an emergency brake under sketchy conditions. I'm kidding... sort of. ;)

Just wondering if anyone knows if there is a better, safer alternative to the Trigger S ski pole?
 
#11
Thanks so much for the feedback!

So yes, they are supposed to release but it sounds like it takes an enormous amount of twisting pressure to make it happen. It also doesn't sound like the Trigger S ski pole is any safer for fingers and thumbs than the old fashion wrist straps because it takes so much force to cause a release. That point worries me, on the other hand, it would probably help if I stopped trying to use my ski pole as an emergency brake under sketchy conditions. I'm kidding... sort of. ;)

Just wondering if anyone knows if there is a better, safer alternative to the Trigger S ski pole?
To me it sounds like it is safer, though maybe not perfect, since it does release under force.

@geargrrl am I remembering correctly that you have some experience with this?
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#12
I use the Leki Triggers because it takes me so long to get my big mittens into loops. It's much faster and less clumsy to just clip into those. I've never thought about the release issue relative to these poles. If I'm in the trees or on the chair, I don't clip in. Otherwise, I do.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#13
I use the Leki Triggers because it takes me so long to get my big mittens into loops. It's much faster and less clumsy to just clip into those. I've never thought about the release issue relative to these poles. If I'm in the trees or on the chair, I don't clip in. Otherwise, I do.
Yes, this too! I got so tired of fumbling with mittens and pole straps.
 

Susan L

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#15
I used to not use pole straps at all! This season I started skiing off-piste and my instructor said my poles could potentially save my life in emergencies. I switched to Leki after the deadly avalanche at my mountain (Taos).
 

snoWYmonkey

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#16
I used to not use pole straps at all! This season I started skiing off-piste and my instructor said my poles could potentially save my life in emergencies. I switched to Leki after the deadly avalanche at my mountain (Taos).
Ironically, it is often off-piste that I suggest for my students to remove the pole straps. The logic being that a basket catching on a bush or tree could cause shoulder damage far in excess of the cost of a new pole if it is lost.

I am very curious what your instructor was referring to in terms of saving your life? I can see the point for a long back country tour, but less so off piste and in bounds.
 

mahgnillig

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#17
Me four!

My hubby got fed up of waiting for me to put my straps on over my mittens after getting off the lift so he bought me the trigger poles. I love them!
 

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