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Kickturns, a useful survival skill even for an intermediate

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#21
Just to blow your mind, check this one out starting at 6:56..
Toni Sailer does perpetual uphill kick turns.
He's on looo-ong old school skis.
Such a show-off!
 
#24
Dawned on me that kick turns could be practiced indoors on soft carpet in a big enough open space. Preferably with the shortest skis hanging around the house.
I feel like that would hurt more if you miscalculate and end up on your butt though, unless the carpet is exceedingly padded. Because I was wondering the same thing.. lol
 
#25
I feel like that would hurt more if you miscalculate and end up on your butt though, unless the carpet is exceedingly padded. Because I was wondering the same thing.. lol
Yeah, but my sense of hard groomed snow in the northeast is that's not exactly a soft landing either.

When you can take your time, starting with initially just getting the tail placed far enough forward while keeping weight on both poles, it's not that hard to back off and just set that ski back down where it started. Putting both poles behind the uphill skis helps to keep the shoulders facing downhill.

Have you seen people stick a tail in the snow to stretch? That's with their shoulders facing the ski tips. Doing that first might be a way to get comfortable with the idea of bringing the boot up that high.
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#27
....
When you can take your time, starting with initially just getting the tail placed far enough forward while keeping weight on both poles, it's not that hard to back off and just set that ski back down where it started. Putting both poles behind the uphill skis helps to keep the shoulders facing downhill.
....
This. Lean back on the poles. Place pole tips far apart left-right-wise, behind you. Position both hands, holding onto pole grips, up against your butt. That way your hands won't wobble as you lean back on them. It feels like you are sitting on the tops of the poles which are cushioned by your gloves/mittens ... sorta. Leaning back this way allows you to lift and rotate the ski without falling over.

Propping the tail of the lifted ski right next to the stance ski's tip is something to work on. At this point if you have light weight skis and bindings you'll be glad.
 
#31
I wouldn't want to get sand in bindings.

In any case, not too much fun along the New England coast during the winter time. It's often cold enough for daytime snowmaking just over an hour's drive away from Boston! :smile:
Good point about sand in the bindings !
 
#32
Learned these as a kid. Thanks for the reminder not to follow you at Taos! ;)
That is one scary run!
LOL. That was my third day skiing ever at TSV. It was a good snow year with lots of powder in trees everywhere. I was with my ski buddy, Jason. Made the mistake of asking Ski Patrol for directions. The assumption seemed to be that we wanted the hardest terrain, which is Lorelei Trees and double-black. What I was looking for was Lorelei, which is black. At Taos, the difference is significant. As I sat waiting for Jason to sort himself out (long story), I could see an instructor thru the trees. We traversed in that direction and had a good time finishing up on Lorelei. Last season I learned the easy way to go from Lorelei to the lower section of Lorelei Trees during my Ski Week.

The fact that I knew survival skills like side slipping, falling leaf, and kick turns from learning as a teen is one reason I was willing to follow Bill for "adventure" runs during the first few years we skied together. I was more of an adventurous intermediate back then before doing clinics or taking semi-private lessons. But I always knew that I could make my way down pretty much any steep terrain one way or another without taking off my skis. Usually only did one adventure run per day though.
 
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#35
I remember it was easier with shorter skis....
The first time I tried doing kick turns at Massanutten (3 years ago), I remember thinking it was a lot easier than with the straight skis I learned on. Those skis were well above my head, maybe a foot?. Probably had skis that were 148cm at Massanutten. The basic straight skis I bought in 1982 were 170cm, and were on the short side because I was an intermediate sticking to groomers back then.
 

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