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Question: How to ski (deep) powder?

#41
The heavier snow at Big Sky was definitely harder to deal with than the fluffy powder at Bridger or Targhee several days earlier. I had pretty wide skis but could've used even fatter to keep more on top. At one point I stopped to wait for my ski buddy. When I turned to look back, I fell over because my skis were buried under at least two feet of dense snow and didn't move at all. Figuring out how to keep moving and making turns in that sort of snow . . . I would need a LOT more experience to be comfortable.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#42
And that light Utah powder is quite nice.... very different than 2-4 ft of heavy sierra cement that I end up skiing. And struggle as well....
Oh, we have our fair share of crappy powder days, trust me. It's a lot warmer than even 20 years ago, and Snowbasin's peak is 8500ish feet. That's Alta/Snowbird's base. We get a lot of rain/snow events from about 7500 feet down. I posted about a specific day last season where I was so excited for a foot of fresh and ended up doing one run and heading home. It was SO dense. I call it knee injury snow.

I've had some amazingly fun powder days at Mammoth when I used to ski there, and I was just cutting my teeth on skis back then.
 

Powgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#43
One of the tips I got from my SO who is rather amazing at skiing powder is to open up the turns. Same for crud. I tend to get caught up in one turn shape, one radius, and I do shop for turns, too. When I open up my turns, it actually FEELS like I'm going slower but I'm really not.

And steeper really IS easier in deeper powder. It used to freak the crap out of me. Learning powder can be really difficult because there just aren't a ton of opportunities to ski it. But it truly is some of the easier stuff to ski when it's untracked. It's just different. And zen like!
Super curious...what does opening up your turns mean?
 

Powgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#46
Bigger, more "patient" turns.
Agreed!

I just picked up the K2 Alluvits (for a song), and I am curious how they will perform in deeper powder and crud...I'm coming off a K2 that is shorter, no metal and 80 underfoot. I learned to ski the deeper stuff (up to 2 ft) on 80 underfoot and 156 in length, so it will be a change to 163 length and 88 wide (with some metal)...I know the crud will be easier!
 
#47
Agreed!

I just picked up the K2 Alluvits (for a song), and I am curious how they will perform in deeper powder and crud...I'm coming off a K2 that is shorter, no metal and 80 underfoot. I learned to ski the deeper stuff (up to 2 ft) on 80 underfoot and 156 in length, so it will be a change to 163 length and 88 wide (with some metal)...I know the crud will be easier!
I skied them at Mammoth in Spring conditions, they were good crud busters, carved well too.
 

Powgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#48
I skied them at Mammoth in Spring conditions, they were good crud busters, carved well too.
So very glad to hear this...I have not demoed them...a leap of faith, but I was happy with my previous K2s...and, one of my best friends, who is an advanced skier, loves her Alluvits! I wanted the Mindbender, but my budget doesn't allow for it at this time...
 
#49
So very glad to hear this...I have not demoed them...a leap of faith, but I was happy with my previous K2s...and, one of my best friends, who is an advanced skier, loves her Alluvits! I wanted the Mindbender, but my budget doesn't allow for it at this time...
The Alluvit is my everyday ski at Big Sky and I absolutely love it. Didn’t think I would because I generally don’t like much tip rocker and 88 underfoot is wider than I normally prefer. But I had to find a replacement for my Oo La Luvs and I have to admit - this is a great ski. I teach on it and free ski on it. It’s excellent in all conditions out west, though not a slouch at holding an edge in firm conditions. It wouldn’t be my daily driver in the east, but adding a narrow carver would create a 2 ski quiver that covers all conditions.

If I had to use one word to describe it, I would use “agile”.

It’s easy to ski and if you’ve got some versatility in your skiing, this ski really shines. It does everything you ask of it very very well.

Enjoy!
 

Powgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#50
A perfect endorsement, @Skisailor!! I was looking for a pair of Oo La Luvs, too...never could find one in my size.

I need a ski for varied terrain, and I wanted a little metal for dampness...my last skis were bouncing me around. I was having some trouble on steeps, too...I thought I had a bad tune, but the shop guy told me I was overpowering them and needed a burlier ski.

On the Alluvits, did you find you had to change your technique in powder?
 
#51
A perfect endorsement, @Skisailor!! I was looking for a pair of Oo La Luvs, too...never could find one in my size.

I need a ski for varied terrain, and I wanted a little metal for dampness...my last skis were bouncing me around. I was having some trouble on steeps, too...I thought I had a bad tune, but the shop guy told me I was overpowering them and needed a burlier ski.

On the Alluvits, did you find you had to change your technique in powder?

Well . . . IMHO, there are differences in technique for powder vs. groomed snow that apply regardless of what ski you are on. So I don’t make any changes to my technique particular to the Alluvits.
 

badger

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#55
I just purchased some Black Crows Captis Birdie 90 width. I got the shorter 149 length. With these skis I am hoping to gain some experience in not-too-deep powder. Not a powder ski by any real definition, but for a petite low weight neophyte, these should be pretty good. Powder is my least favorite condition. Last year in Arizona (where i ski most of the time) we had some astounding powder days that compelled almost anyone on the slopes to experiment with the basics if they wanted to ski at all during those days. I discovered that powder can be fun, if not challenging.
 
#56
I just purchased some Black Crows Captis Birdie 90 width. I got the shorter 149 length. With these skis I am hoping to gain some experience in not-too-deep powder. Not a powder ski by any real definition, but for a petite low weight neophyte, these should be pretty good. Powder is my least favorite condition. Last year in Arizona (where i ski most of the time) we had some astounding powder days that compelled almost anyone on the slopes to experiment with the basics if they wanted to ski at all during those days. I discovered that powder can be fun, if not challenging.
I've checked out the Captis Birdie as in the market for a 90mm ski. I currently have the Camox Birdie in a 156 (think that was the shortest length) that is super fun in powder-y ungroomed conditions.
Can't wait to hear how you like the Captis Birdie ! Think a great ski that I should consider trying.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#57
I just purchased some Black Crows Captis Birdie 90 width. I got the shorter 149 length. With these skis I am hoping to gain some experience in not-too-deep powder. Not a powder ski by any real definition, but for a petite low weight neophyte, these should be pretty good. Powder is my least favorite condition. Last year in Arizona (where i ski most of the time) we had some astounding powder days that compelled almost anyone on the slopes to experiment with the basics if they wanted to ski at all during those days. I discovered that powder can be fun, if not challenging.
I'm telling you, especially for us lighter and smaller gals, the shape and construction of the ski is as important as the width. Here's hoping to another stellar season for you (and us in Utah, too :ski2:)
 

Powgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#58
Awesome! Please report back and let us know what you think.
Skied them yesterday and am so pleased!! Conditions/terrain was limited, but I couldn't believe how well they performed on the hardpack, a few patches of ice...they held so very well...also, just busted thru the crud. They turn easily, and, yes, they felt agile, yet very stable...no chatter or wobbling with speed.

I am excited to try them in powder and some bowls...

The metal made them feel a little heavier than my previous skis, but the stability trade-off is so worth it!!
 

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