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How to get rid of a one legged A- frame

#65
Okay, I’m getting paranoid that no one has commented on the technique (or lack of) forcing my cuffs into compliance.. And have been wondering the what ifs of whether this will negatively affect my skiing now haha. Someone ease my brain! I do however plan to get an alignment assessment by a professional still, just not sure if I NEED to prioritize that before day 1 on snow or not?
 

Jenny

Angel Diva
#66
Okay, I’m getting paranoid that no one has commented on the technique (or lack of) forcing my cuffs into compliance.. And have been wondering the what ifs of whether this will negatively affect my skiing now haha. Someone ease my brain! I do however plan to get an alignment assessment by a professional still, just not sure if I NEED to prioritize that before day 1 on snow or not?
So sorry, but I have no clue. It all sounded safe enough to me when you said the guy told you you couldn’t go too far but I know nothing. If it makes you feel any better, I’ll likely be posting canting questions soon, based on what the bootfitter told me.

But if you’re still looking for AT stuff, why not haul along your alpine boots and have them take a look at the same time?
 
#67
So sorry, but I have no clue. It all sounded safe enough to me when you said the guy told you you couldn’t go too far but I know nothing. If it makes you feel any better, I’ll likely be posting canting questions soon, based on what the bootfitter told me.

But if you’re still looking for AT stuff, why not haul along your alpine boots and have them take a look at the same time?
I actually do plan to do that assuming I get somewhere to look at AT stuff in the next couple of weeks. Figure that would be most efficient! Of course work has been crazy crazy busy so I’ve been having a hard time coming up with a time I can head up. I’d rather go on a weekday than a busy weekend because I think it’ll likely take awhile. :rolleyes:
 
#69
Okay, I’m getting paranoid that no one has commented on the technique (or lack of) forcing my cuffs into compliance.. And have been wondering the what ifs of whether this will negatively affect my skiing now haha. Someone ease my brain! I do however plan to get an alignment assessment by a professional still, just not sure if I NEED to prioritize that before day 1 on snow or not?
No news is good news! But we wouldn’t want you to be paranoid, so . . . What you did with the cuff sounded fine to me. :smile::smile:

I would say to ski at least one day before getting an alignment or making any changes. Remind yourself what your current setup feels like before you change it.
 
#70
No news is good news! But we wouldn’t want you to be paranoid, so . . . What you did with the cuff sounded fine to me. :smile::smile:

I would say to ski at least one day before getting an alignment or making any changes. Remind yourself what your current setup feels like before you change it.
Haha thanks! I was just starting to think oh no what if it’s overdone now and I can’t get on edge and I’m on the WROD and and and.. :rotf:
 
#71
Haha thanks! I was just starting to think oh no what if it’s overdone now and I can’t get on edge and I’m on the WROD and and and.. :rotf:
Worst case scenario...bring the hex wrench in your pocket and swap them back on the side of the trail if completely necessary...otherwise, get to the bottom and get them back to where they were in the lodge.

I can’t possibly think that you’ve done anything that would be so detrimental to your skiing that you won’t be able to get down.

For a peace of mind, put on your boots and click into your skis on the living room carpet..shuffle around, move onto your edges, and see how it feels.
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#72
Worst case scenario...bring the hex wrench in your pocket and swap them back on the side of the trail if completely necessary...otherwise, get to the bottom and get them back to where they were in the lodge.

I can’t possibly think that you’ve done anything that would be so detrimental to your skiing that you won’t be able to get down.

For a peace of mind, put on your boots and click into your skis on the living room carpet..shuffle around, move onto your edges, and see how it feels.
^^^^^ 100%. It won't make you suddenly unable to ski.
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#73
Okay, I’m getting paranoid that no one has commented on the technique (or lack of) forcing my cuffs into compliance.. And have been wondering the what ifs of whether this will negatively affect my skiing now haha. Someone ease my brain! I do however plan to get an alignment assessment by a professional still, just not sure if I NEED to prioritize that before day 1 on snow or not?
Yes, get the cuffs looked at now before ski season starts. I can't remember what you did either.

At this point in the pre-season bootfitters will be less busy. So the earlier in the season, the less rushed they will be. Find a shop that has a race department and that sells race skis and speed suits, and that basically serves race teams in your area. Call ahead and ask for an appointment to work with the bootfitter that serves the race kids on the teams.

If your cuffs can't be aligned appropriately with your lower legs given the hardware currently on them, the bootfitter may be able to find adjustable connectors in the deep recesses of the bootfitting workshop that can fix your issue. Maybe.

It does matter whether or not the cuffs are aligned to the lower legs. Some people call this "canting." Let them, but know it isn't really "canting." It does not do the same thing as true canting done to the boot soles. Get the cuff alignment confirmed as right before addressing any true canting needs.
 
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#74
For peace of mind, I'd get them checked out and discuss the changes with a trusty bootfitter. @liquidfeet makes a good point about the pre-season being less busy.
 

Abbi

Angel Diva
#75
Okay, I’m getting paranoid that no one has commented on the technique (or lack of) forcing my cuffs into compliance.. And have been wondering the what ifs of whether this will negatively affect my skiing now haha. Someone ease my brain! I do however plan to get an alignment assessment by a professional still, just not sure if I NEED to prioritize that before day 1 on snow or not?
Don’t fall into the trap of paralysis by analysis!
 

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