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How to get back to my lessons?

glamouretta

Certified Ski Diva
#1
I fell of a horse in April, but gladly I am fine. I always wear protection. I am a beginner, it was my seventh lesson or something, during the lesson the horse reared I didn't know how to handle the situation so I fell! I was scared! Doctor told me everything is fine. But I had pain for few days and I couldn't sit down or get up easily even lying on bed was difficult but it was normal and things got better gradually.

Now it's five months and I didn't take a lesson since I fell! I really miss it but a part of me is more afraid than before. I was afraid that's why I'm progressing slowly and only take private lessons. But after the fall, I am more afraid than before, though I should have more courage that I have fallen and still ok, it was not the end of the world!

I don't know if anyone had the same experience? I really want to get back to my lessons and start jumping! But I need some tips or something to push me forward!

Thank you

P.S: excuse my English!
 

bounceswoosh

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#2
I'm surprised no one has responded. I haven't ridden a horse in twenty years, but I've hurt myself doing other things. The honest answer is, you just have to do it. In English there's even an expression, "get back on the horse."

But. What happened to spook the horse? Usually beginners are assigned horses that are very docile. I wonder if you need to be on a different horse.
 
#3
I see it as a question of motivation. You were taking private lessons. If you want to keep riding and fear is holding you back, get off your duff and call you instructor and explain your fear and hesitancy. A good instructor will understand and be able to help you appropriately, most likely by scaling back until you get so we hat comfortable again. If you aren't even willing to make the call....
 
#4
I'm not sure I feel like encouraging the OP to "get back on the horse" though.

It seems a rather odd combination, for someone afraid of falling off, to aspire to jumping!

I can understand if it's just trail riding or even dressage, I'd say just need to "get over" the fear. But jumping??? Of the few people (only 2-3) I know who did jumping, ALL of them had fallen HARD at least once (or more)!!!

By the way, the more you're afraid, the more likely you'll fall. Many horses can "sense" fear of the rider on their back. It upsets their natural rhythm, making the horse more likely to move in unexpected ways.

Disclaimer: I never did jumping, only dressage and casual trail rides
 

volklgirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#5
I'm surprised they didn't make you get right back on then and there, unless you were seriously hurt. The 5 month wait merely gave a tiny fear of falling time to grow into a monstrous thing. I agree that contacting your instructor should be the first step. A great trainer will know how to alleviate your fear somewhat and build confidence, whether by mental techniques, physical exercises, or choice of horse.

Rest assured, you WILL fall jumping. I've been dumped between fences, in front of fences, over fences, and through fences....and yes, it hurts. Sometimes a lot. Jumping requires exquisite balance, tons of confidence, and a pretty aggressive mind set. I'm thinking you've got a long, long, LONG way to go before you get there - but don't give up!!
 

contesstant

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#6
I pretty much grew up on the back of a horse :D I am very grateful I did most of my getting dumped as a kid!

Was this your own horse, or a lesson horse? Why did the horse rear, do you know? Do you feel like the horse was a lot to handle? Regardless, Geargrrl is right, you need to find a good instructor who will help you get back in the saddle again on a horse that is suited to your current skill level. Rearing is really scary. I would take one who bucks over one who rears ANY time.
 

WaterGirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#8
I agree with @volklgirl and @contesstant and @abc .
Getting bucked off is one thing -- but rearing is very different. Horses used in a lesson for a "Beginner" should be calm and forgiving. Because you don't mention why the horse reared, its hard to interpret if this was a reasonable response on the horses part or perhaps the horse was not a beginners horse to start with. Falling off is a horse will eventually happen at some point in time for every rider. It seems like this was a bit scary b/c you didn't know how to react to the horse going up on its hind legs. Depending on why the horse reared, you may be better off with a different trainer, and certainly a different horse.

Horses that rear are unpredictable and its a nasty and dangerous habit. Any horse will buck if they feel good or are fresh and that is bound to happen. I have been riding all my life and involved in the horse industry on many levels. A rearing horse is one you want to stay away from.

At seven lessons --even if private, you should be working on finding your balance, walking and trotting, using your hands and legs independently, and steering the horse thru simple turns. If the instructor had you jumping at lesson #7 - please find someone else.
 

WaterGirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#9
Find a trainer that will work slowly with you, and discuss what happened. Maybe start by just riding on a long line where the trainer has control of the horse (and you also have control with the reins).
Perhaps working in the controlled area of a small circle to begin with will make you more comfortable and help rebuild your confidence.
 

Inoffensive Nickname

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#11
I'm assuming that since you're here, you're also a skier. If so, can you take that confidence you have at the top of a hill and apply it to being on the back of a horse? When you fall when you're skiing, do you get right back up, or do you sit on the hill worrying about the next fall? That time in between the last fall and the next ride can really mess with your head. Three seasons ago, my ski season ended with a shoulder injury. The following season's opening day found me at the top of the hill, shaking in my boots, but I knew it was something I loved so much that I wasn't going to let my mind get in the way of my fun. Granted, horse injuries can be much more intimidating, just thinking about 700 lbs of "willful child" between you and terra firma, but downhill skiing can be just as dangerous (think about 700 lbs or about 10 "willful children" between you and the bottom of the hill). Maybe if you just set up the lesson, pay in advance to keep yourself from canceling, remember how much you love riding, and just go?
 

glamouretta

Certified Ski Diva
#12
I'm assuming that since you're here, you're also a skier. If so, can you take that confidence you have at the top of a hill and apply it to being on the back of a horse? When you fall when you're skiing, do you get right back up, or do you sit on the hill worrying about the next fall? That time in between the last fall and the next ride can really mess with your head. Three seasons ago, my ski season ended with a shoulder injury. The following season's opening day found me at the top of the hill, shaking in my boots, but I knew it was something I loved so much that I wasn't going to let my mind get in the way of my fun. Granted, horse injuries can be much more intimidating, just thinking about 700 lbs of "willful child" between you and terra firma, but downhill skiing can be just as dangerous (think about 700 lbs or about 10 "willful children" between you and the bottom of the hill). Maybe if you just set up the lesson, pay in advance to keep yourself from canceling, remember how much you love riding, and just go?
Inspiring. I think I can do it!

Thank you!
 

Moonrocket

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#13
I feel like sometimes you need to listen to your gut. Is there another stable you could try and see if you feel more confident? At least around here there are some incredibly bad lesson programs. Like the pictures on the web page make you worried for the people's safety. Private lessons might be a good start. Asking at a tack shop for a good safe place to lesson can give you good leads.

What happened that caused the horse to rear? That's a pretty serious vice where the horse really does not want to forward. What did the instructor do when he reared?

I luckily have never been hurt enough falling that I didn't get right back on so I don't have a lot of advice other than it seems like you want to try again, but there is something making you uncomfortable. I've had times I was not comfortable with an instructor or barn and my gut was almost always right.

That said riding and jumping are a blast- so I really think you should give it another go!
 

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