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How many skis to own?

Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I got back into skiing last year after 15 years off. I found some mindbender 85’s on sale for $180, so got those last year. They are okay but a bit long at 167, I’m just under 5’4. This year I recently got some faction prodigy 0’s 150 length. They are okay but a little dull and boring. Don’t do great on packed snow and overall I find the tail whipping out a little too easily. I feel greedy but I’d really like to try a 3rd pair, just not sure which. How many pairs of skis do you all keep at once and which skis are the favorites on here? Id like some that are solid and sharp during turns as well as stable at high speeds (prodigy’s are not). Thanks!
 

diymom

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Where do you ski? East coast or out west makes a difference. Also what kind of runs do you like to ski? Right now you are Goldilocks. At 5'4 a 167cm ski with an 85 waist is long. A 150 cm twin tip is short. The just right ski for you is out there, and the length will be somewhere in between those two. If you tell us a little more about where and what you like to ski, the collective hive will most likely offer suggestions to demo. And someone is very likely to ask you about your boots :smile:
 

SarahXC

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
It’s also not just height but weight that matters. I am heavier than average for my height so I usually like a longer than average ski for stability. Those lighter than average might go the other direction.

Edited to add: I have 3 active pairs—a narrowish (84) for mainly firm groomers, a fun midrange (98) for most all mountain conditions, and a soft conditions/powder ski (112).
 

Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Where do you ski? East coast or out west makes a difference. Also what kind of runs do you like to ski? Right now you are Goldilocks. At 5'4 a 167cm ski with an 85 waist is long. A 150 cm twin tip is short. The just right ski for you is out there, and the length will be somewhere in between those two. If you tell us a little more about where and what you like to ski, the collective hive will most likely offer suggestions to demo. And someone is very likely to ask you about your boots :smile:
A bit of both, currently in Ohio / east right now but going to Tahoe in a few weeks and then Colorado before or after that. Next year goal is to live near Tahoe and or mammoth. I’m a travel nurse so options can vary… I agree, both seem like opposite ends of the spectrum. The boots factor I’m definently trying to figure out as well. I have the k2 dispatch w lt’s (very aggressive and not a universal boot), since I’d like to end up touring a bit. But just for some Salomon mv 80’s as a “basic” boot to try out that I’ll be able to buckle all the way without pain LoL. Also hoping to get a 3rd ski boot..
 

snoWYmonkey

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
1 pair for rocks, 5 pair for carving all the way to big bottomless pow, and one for touring.
 

Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
It’s also not just height but weight that matters. I am heavier than average for my height so I usually like a longer than average ski for stability. Those lighter than average might go the other direction.

Edited to add: I have 3 active pairs—a narrowish (84) for mainly firm groomers, a fun midrange (98) for most all mountain conditions, and a soft conditions/powder ski (112).
Around 115! Yea that’s kind of the setup I’d like. Although it’s tough to know where to go next since both of my current skis are already jack of all trades but masters of none
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
Sounds like you need to demo some skis to find something you really like, including what length range you are most comfortable on. I’m also 5’4” and my sweet spot is mid 160s, but I have some longer and some shorter than that based on the ski or their purpose. Your weight, ability level, and preferred terrain are all important factors too.

For your question, I have a bunch of skis for different conditions and just because I like them. There is no magic number, and you’ll find many large quiver keepers here.. we are also really good enablers for purchasing more if that’s what you’re looking for. :wink:
 

Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Sounds like you need to demo some skis to find something you really like, including what length range you are most comfortable on. I’m also 5’4” and my sweet spot is mid 160s, but I have some longer and some shorter than that based on the ski or their purpose. Your weight, ability level, and preferred terrain are all important factors too.

For your question, I have a bunch of skis for different conditions and just because I like them. There is no magic number, and you’ll find many large quiver keepers here.. we are also really good enablers for purchasing more if that’s what you’re looking for. :wink:
Lol yea after testing out the new ones and liking them but feeling like they aren’t perfect for certain parts of the park I definently began instantly wanting another pair to try I think being able to demo a bunch would be awesome, just not too interested in paying to rent since I’m stubborn and would rather just own stuff smh lol. My downfall in all areas of life. Glad to hear there are people on this forum who own more then 2, I was trying to go through previous posts and 2 seemed to be the common number which to me doesn’t seem like enough
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
I'm with @MissySki , you need to demo and then decide. The Mindbender's are a tad long. Low 160's would have been better. The Factions are soft, too short because they are a youth ski aka Tweener ski. Not quite adult, but not kid. Wrong ski. Make those gone.
 

Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I'm with @MissySki , you need to demo and then decide. The Mindbender's are a tad long. Low 160's would have been better. The Factions are soft, too short because they are a youth ski aka Tweener ski. Not quite adult, but not kid. Wrong ski. Make those gone.
They’re not listed as youth, there’s a youth version but mines supposed to be adult… but yea they are def really soft and possibly a bit short although I’m liking how easy they are to turn in, but with not being solid carvers it’s hard to totally enjoy the easy turning. But yes my overall thought with both was “neither are just right” for me. I do need to try out some more but not sure what the best way to go about doing that is.. I think if I do some good research and pick the right 3rd ski I can own vs rent and be happy, idk though ‍♀️
 

diymom

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
The boots factor I’m definently trying to figure out as well. I have the k2 dispatch w lt’s (very aggressive and not a universal boot), since I’d like to end up touring a bit. But just for some Salomon mv 80’s as a “basic” boot to try out that I’ll be able to buckle all the way without pain LoL. Also hoping to get a 3rd ski boot..=p\
Are you using the same trial and error method for choosing boots? Or have you been to a boot fitter (not boot seller) to figure out size, fit, and flex?
 

Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Are you using the same trial and error method for choosing boots? Or have you been to a boot fitter (not boot seller) to figure out size, fit, and flex?
I’ve been to a couple boot fitters, both with different reccomends and brands. One had the same mentality as me which is buy for the ones you can grow into vs outgrow after a season , where as the other reccomended soft flex rossignols which didn’t feel great tried on. So kind of trial and error with both of their input in mind. I figure if I have 3 different boots all of which I find at off season or fair price it’d be a great way to get experience learning what I like and which brands or models feel good‍
 

diymom

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I do need to try out some more but not sure what the best way to go about doing that is
Look for a demo day. It is usually less expensive than a series of personal demos. Get on as many different skis as you can for a run or two each. Take photos of each ski to help remember it. Take notes on each ski of what you like and don't like. Even if you don't end up with one of those skis for whatever reason, it will help to narrow down the field and look for something similar.
 

Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Look for a demo day. It is usually less expensive than a series of personal demos. Get on as many different skis as you can for a run or two each. Take photos of each ski to help remember it. Take notes on each ski of what you like and don't like. Even if you don't end up with one of those skis for whatever reason, it will help to narrow down the field and look for something similar.
Yea, just not sure where I could go that allows you to easily swap skis throughout the day? Seems like rental prices in the places I wanna go are pretty pricey also. At least with owning demos I can save a pair for a friend or family to use or attempt resale haha. But I’m def down to try rental demo if affordable and easy to swap during day!
 

Analisa

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
For me, I add skis to solve problems. (Which pretty much turns in to N+1). 100-something skis leaving things to be desired on groomer days? Add a 93. Touring skis feeling heavy? Add a lighter setup to the quiver. Tired of lugging 2 pairs of skis on road trips for inbounds & out? Get a hybrid setup. I started gear testing and learned that each ski is designed for a slightly different use case. I'm at a collection of 6, contemplating a 7th. And I only own 1 setup under 100 width so that number has plenty of room to grow.

I definitely agree about demoing, discovering what you like, and learning a few construction basics that explain why you like it. Are the skis burly? Soft? Poppy? "Directional" where you really need to get forward and pressure the tips? Or progressive where your stance is relaxed and upright? Knowing these things will make shopping more effective for you, whether you want to simplify down to 1 setup or build a quiver of 10. Knowing what you like means that the skis you own will have a purpose, be exciting to ski (at least in certain conditions), and make the cost worth it. I started my ski buying journey in earnest with 1 industry demo day and 1 personal demo day (where the on-mountain shop let me swap out throughout the day). Now, I can buy skis without having to pay to rent or demo since I know which skis are "close relatives."

And in terms of sizing, I'd double check the length on the Mindbender 85. I know the past few seasons that ski's come in a 163 & 170, so it might be a different length or one of the widths that did come in that size.
 

Rachel614

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
For me, I add skis to solve problems. (Which pretty much turns in to N+1). 100-something skis leaving things to be desired on groomer days? Add a 93. Touring skis feeling heavy? Add a lighter setup to the quiver. Tired of lugging 2 pairs of skis on road trips for inbounds & out? Get a hybrid setup. I started gear testing and learned that each ski is designed for a slightly different use case. I'm at a collection of 6, contemplating a 7th. And I only own 1 setup under 100 width so that number has plenty of room to grow.

I definitely agree about demoing, discovering what you like, and learning a few construction basics that explain why you like it. Are the skis burly? Soft? Poppy? "Directional" where you really need to get forward and pressure the tips? Or progressive where your stance is relaxed and upright? Knowing these things will make shopping more effective for you, whether you want to simplify down to 1 setup or build a quiver of 10. Knowing what you like means that the skis you own will have a purpose, be exciting to ski (at least in certain conditions), and make the cost worth it. I started my ski buying journey in earnest with 1 industry demo day and 1 personal demo day (where the on-mountain shop let me swap out throughout the day). Now, I can buy skis without having to pay to rent or demo since I know which skis are "close relatives."

And in terms of sizing, I'd double check the length on the Mindbender 85. I know the past few seasons that ski's come in a 163 & 170, so it might be a different length or one of the widths that did come in that size.
Dang I just checked my email order history and it says they’re 156’s smh. But they’re a lot taller than me so I need to double check when I get home… not completely sure. But either way yea I was having such a good time on the prodigy’s in comparison and thinking that I could see skis being like tools, needing one for each situation. I’m a heavier researcher so I figure if I pick a variety of good brand well reviewed skis and use them in the circumstances they’re intended for, that that option would be just as good as rental demoing. Maybe add in 1-2 new skis each year. Maybe the mindbenders just felt rough last year because it was pretty powdery and they’re fairly narrow for that circumstance. Plus it was my first time skiing in forever and I was on a double blue diamond
 

Trailside Trixie

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I'm a huge fan of demoing. I've done enough demoing over the years so nowadays I"ll often buy without trying because I don't mind selling them if they don't work out. I have quite the lot of skis. I keep skis in 3 places but come summertime when "all the kids come home from college" I usualy go ok wow lol. As said above there's no magic number for skis. Demo til you find something you like. Some people have 1 pair of skis, some have 20 pairs.
 

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