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How flexible is boot flex?

elemmac

Angel Diva
There's definitely a very frustrated side of me that is inclined to listen to the park city bootfitter that suggested I use a 22.5 for a few years as I continue getting better, then look into junior race boots from there. At the same time, there's so much incredible experience and advice on this site that I can't discount either.
Keep in mind your bootfitter knows what your feet look like, and knows exactly how “big” a 22.5 is on you…No one on this site (unless your bootfitter is a member here), can say the same. There are a lot of absolute comments here that I do not think should be as definitive…there are always grey areas in bootfitting and ski gear in general. The perfect boot needs to match you foot’s anatomy, and your skill level…but there’s a lot of give and take.

Do you currently have the S/Max 90? Or was it recommended by the fitter, and now you’re looking for a deal?

Back to your original question…120 to 100 in modifications is a huge step, if we were talking 120-110, I’d say take the deal and give it a go. If you were recommended to go with the S/Max 90, the 120 should have an identical fit, but I would probably steer clear of something that stiff. Have you asked your bootfitter what they think? That might be the best place to start, considering they would be the one doing the work on the boot.
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
^^Yes I know I come on strong. Maybe that comes across as hubris. But sometimes emphasis is needed so I go that route more than holding back. Especially when it has to do with bootfitters who profile women skiers and sell them the wrong boot.

I got sold the wrong boots too many times as I was trying to build my skills to not think this way. Some of those bootfitters who did not take seriously my request for boots that would support skill building came with quite strong recommendations.

Then I struggled for years, trying to figure out why my skis wouldn't give me the turns I expected. I thought it was me. I finally found a bootfitter who did me right and fitted me correctly, and I'll never go to anyone else as long as he's around.
 

elemmac

Angel Diva
^^Yes I know I come on strong. Maybe that comes across as hubris. But sometimes emphasis is needed so I go that route more than holding back. Especially when it has to do with bootfitters who profile women skiers and sell them the wrong boot.
I was really just speaking about the overall general feel of this thread. I think there’s a lot of good advice here (your post included in that), but also a lot not known about the OP, her feet and how she skis.

Personally, I think if the OP was fitted in a 22.5, 90 Flex Salomon S/Max, the idea of buying a 120 in the same model boot is not an outlandish idea…and quite frankly, if it’s for the right price…say 60% off (I have no idea what the actual sale was)…it might be worth buying, getting it softened a bit, and giving it a whirl. But that decision would need to come with the acknowledgment that it might not work out, and could be a total waste of money. I went from a 70 to a 110 flex boot when upgrading as an intermediate skier…it helped my skiing tremendously. That’s why I asked if the OP has talked it over with the bootfitter that fitted her into the 90s…they might be able to soften it enough to work well.
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
So, it's too hot to do anything, so why not do some research.
1. S/MAX models look like they are on their way out. That deal should be really cheap!!
2. Differences between the 120 and 90 besides the flex - totally different liner, different power strap, so the fit alone will be different with the race liner instead of the regular liner.
3. The site I was on didn't show anything below 22MP, so anything smaller may not exist in that model line.

Like @liquidfeet I've spent a lot of money over the years on boots that just were not right. Or spent the same amount again to make them fit. My boot fitter does not sell boots. He starts by suggesting maybe 2 models that will be good for you. Then it's your choice. In my case, only 1. I bought those and haven't looked back. I'm in for new ones this year, so I know the OP's pain (and anyone else at this point). Right now, I'm going to the new version of my boot as it's still made.
 

fgor

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Getting boots that fit is awesome :smile:

I will say that during my experience demoing with 22.5 boots and a 265 BSL, for some demo skis I really was at the smallest possible adjustment range (the demo tech normally commented on it). For some demo setups there was a little bit of extra room available. At 22.5 I can demo everything but I could definitely see potential issues with some demo setups at 21.5. That said, getting boots that fit properly is super important! And not being able to demo some skis isn't the end of the world.

I don't know what availability of things is like where you are. Is the 22.5 much too big for you length-wise - are you a solid 21.5 or sort of in-between? Junior race boots in a 22.5 for you is an option as well which will improve fit while retaining your ability to click into absolutely any demo binding. Did the fitter discuss that with you at all? As long as they're properly narrow - 96mm or under. (I know "race boots" exist which are wider than that - eg I've tried on the Lange 97mm race boots, the blue and orange ones, and honestly they feel wider than the 98mm hawx ultra to me!!)

(for me, i needed race boots in a 22.5 to accommodate my narrow feet, but the lead time was VERY long - over half a year for them to arrive in the country after my fitter ordered them. however, i do live in a remote island country :smile: availability might be much better where you are!)

Can't speak to the flex at all unfortunately. How much money is the deal saving you? You will end up paying a bootfitter to soften the flex but maybe it's still worth it.

If you buy these boots and they end up still being a bit too big after the liners pack in - but they're the best shell fit you can get at the moment - you have the option of aftermarket liners to fill in some more space. I used Zipfits for the same reason until I got my current boots (junior race boots of course!). Zipfits would not have worked for my first pair of boots though, those were WAY too big!
 

WaterGirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Junior race boots in a 22.5 for you is an option as well which will improve fit while retaining your ability to click into absolutely any demo binding. Did the fitter discuss that with you at all? As long as they're properly narrow - 96mm or under. (I know "race boots" exist which are wider than that - eg I've tried on the Lange 97mm race boots, the blue and orange ones, and honestly they feel wider than the 98mm hawx ultra to me!!)
FWIW Lange's "Race" boots range from a 92 last (World Cup series w/ smallest available @ 22.5 with flex 110 to 140) to a 100 last in the RS series. Admittedly their Junior race boot appears to be a 97 last but does come in a 21.5
 

flyingsquirrel

Certified Ski Diva
I am wondering why this ntegrated binding won't be adjustable to your boots, no matter how short they are. Integrated bindings tend to be adjustable. However, 21.5 is a short boot so there's that. Did your bootfitter tell you that a 21.5 won't work in this particular binding?

If the bootfitter didn't tell you they won't fit, then let's see what's going on here.
--Can you provide a photo of your bindings from the side?
--Also a photo of them from the top would be helpful.
--Also maybe a full photo of the skis you are talking about.

They're the Rossignol Black Ops Dreamer with the integrated Look Xpress 10 bindings. I can def pull out my skis and take a picture, but my info just comes from the look page (https://www.look-bindings.com/product/xpress-10-gw-b93-black) that says it fits BSLs from 260-385!
 

flyingsquirrel

Certified Ski Diva
I was a bit out of pocket this weekend, but came back to some awesome awesome feedback and questions.

I guess to clarify, I was originally fit for the S/Max 90 in a 22.5 around the middle of last season but have since gotten a bit stronger and have felt that my current boots (also Salomons in a 90 flex) are a bit too soft. We didn't purchase the 22.5 at the store last season as the bootfitter also recommended looking into Jr. Race Boots in a 21.5 but I didn't realize until afterwards that buying 21.5 boots would cause many chain reaction issues with my personal set up.

The S/Max 120s were very heavily discounted (+80% off) and with my current 90 flex feeling slightly soft, I was hoping that having a bootfitter adjust them slightly softer and knowing that the boot itself fits my foot would work out on all ends.

They did get delivered today and I tried them on just a bit earlier - they definitely are noticeably stiffer than the 90s, but I can still flex them forward with a little bit of effort. I'm planning on going to another fitter next weekend to just get another opinion, but am considering just holding on to these for now.

I guess to hijack my own thread a little bit -- how far should you really be able to flex your boot easily for it to be correct / appropriate?
 

AdkLynn

Certified Ski Diva
I was a bit out of pocket this weekend, but came back to some awesome awesome feedback and questions.

I guess to clarify, I was originally fit for the S/Max 90 in a 22.5 around the middle of last season but have since gotten a bit stronger and have felt that my current boots (also Salomons in a 90 flex) are a bit too soft. We didn't purchase the 22.5 at the store last season as the bootfitter also recommended looking into Jr. Race Boots in a 21.5 but I didn't realize until afterwards that buying 21.5 boots would cause many chain reaction issues with my personal set up.

The S/Max 120s were very heavily discounted (+80% off) and with my current 90 flex feeling slightly soft, I was hoping that having a bootfitter adjust them slightly softer and knowing that the boot itself fits my foot would work out on all ends.

They did get delivered today and I tried them on just a bit earlier - they definitely are noticeably stiffer than the 90s, but I can still flex them forward with a little bit of effort. I'm planning on going to another fitter next weekend to just get another opinion, but am considering just holding on to these for now.

I guess to hijack my own thread a little bit -- how far should you really be able to flex your boot easily for it to be correct / appropriate?
I haven’t read everything in this thread, but if it helps…I’m an advanced intermediate, 72 yrs, 105 lbs, 22.5, I’m in a Lange SC 90 flex jr race boot now for five years, best boot I’ve ever skied. Fits like glove, all pressure points punched out, thanks to an expert boot fitter, flex is relative to brand. These are plenty flexible, but are power steering at Whiteface! Get a good boot fitter, don’t be afraid of jr. race boots. Except for the color!
 

Mudgirl630

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I was a bit out of pocket this weekend, but came back to some awesome awesome feedback and questions.

I guess to clarify, I was originally fit for the S/Max 90 in a 22.5 around the middle of last season but have since gotten a bit stronger and have felt that my current boots (also Salomons in a 90 flex) are a bit too soft. We didn't purchase the 22.5 at the store last season as the bootfitter also recommended looking into Jr. Race Boots in a 21.5 but I didn't realize until afterwards that buying 21.5 boots would cause many chain reaction issues with my personal set up.

The S/Max 120s were very heavily discounted (+80% off) and with my current 90 flex feeling slightly soft, I was hoping that having a bootfitter adjust them slightly softer and knowing that the boot itself fits my foot would work out on all ends.

They did get delivered today and I tried them on just a bit earlier - they definitely are noticeably stiffer than the 90s, but I can still flex them forward with a little bit of effort. I'm planning on going to another fitter next weekend to just get another opinion, but am considering just holding on to these for now.

I guess to hijack my own thread a little bit -- how far should you really be able to flex your boot easily for it to be correct / appropriate?
They will get stiffer in the cold temp.
 

elemmac

Angel Diva
The S/Max 120s were very heavily discounted (+80% off) and with my current 90 flex feeling slightly soft, I was hoping that having a bootfitter adjust them slightly softer and knowing that the boot itself fits my foot would work out on all ends.

They did get delivered today and I tried them on just a bit earlier - they definitely are noticeably stiffer than the 90s, but I can still flex them forward with a little bit of effort. I'm planning on going to another fitter next weekend to just get another opinion, but am considering just holding on to these for now.

I guess to hijack my own thread a little bit -- how far should you really be able to flex your boot easily for it to be correct / appropriate?
At 80% off, I would say it's worth the consideration (ordering, trying them on, and taking them to a bootfitter for evaluation). If the bootfitter thinks you made a mistake, I'm guessing you can return them?

Unfortunately, boot flex is not an easy thing to evaluate. It is a mix of skill, weight, height, ankle range of motion, and even some personal preference. This is where your bootfitter should be able to help evaluate whether or not the flex is right for you, and they should be able to give you feedback on if it's possible to lower it enough to be correct for you.
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Some random things about boot flex in general. I'll use "you" but not to mean anyone in particular.

--Diagnosing whether your flex is too low
If you ski on warm days when the snow gets dense and wet, you'll find out real fast whether your boot flex is too soft. The snow will press back on the fronts of the skis, which will force the shins into the tongues. No problem, that's the way things work with skis and boots. But if the boot folds forward as this happens, then you are in danger of face-planting, and you'll be immediately aware of this. Boots should not fold forward so easily that the skier feels insecure about falling forward when the snow pushes back; if they do, the flex is too soft. ........All boots stiffen up in colder temps, but skiers ski in snow that changes continually. The boot should give you enough cuff support to keep your lower leg upright when the snow pushes back. It should go without saying that if the boot folds forward even in cold temps, then stiffer boots are needed. ........It's not only conditions reveal that boots are too soft. If you begin skiing faster with higher edge angles as your skills increase, an older boot may not offer enough support. If your skills increase and you start skiing cut-up crud, your old boots may not offer enough support. If you move from an area with champagne powder to the pacific northwest where the snow falls wet and dense, your old boots may need to be replaced with stiffer boots.

--Diagnosing if you are flexing the boot or just the tongue
Boot flex happens when the back spine of the boot bends forward. Stiffer boots with higher flex numbers have stiffer, thicker spines. If as you ski the spine doesn't bend forward but the tongue does, allowing your lower leg to tilt forward, that's not due to the boot flex. It's due to the fact that your lower leg moves forward in space, inside the cuff, away from the boot's spine. If you get a gap back behind your calf when you "flex" the boot, and it looks like you are moving the tongue forward but not bending the spine, then the boot is not flexing at all. The boot is not being used to its design specifications. Skiers buy Booster Straps and have them put onto the boot to replace the non-elastic power strap. The elastic Booster Strap binds the lower leg back against the spine securely so the skier can access the boot's flex potential.

--Diagnosing how high a boot flex your skiing requires
When the lower leg is firmly bound the the spine, and you bend forward at the ankle to hover your upper body's weight (including hips) forward over the front of the skis, the boot acts as a lever. It levers the front of the ski downward onto the snow. (You can stand in the boot in such a way that the tail stays pressed down while the tips are levered; that's another topic.) It's good to gain the skill of levering the front downward (aka "getting forward"), but too soft a boot flex can undermine the development of this skill. ..........A boot with 140+ flex will not flex at all unless the skier is moving with significant speed and edge angle. That boot's lack of flex maximizes the levering action, which is what the skier in that boot (often a racer) wants. A skier in a 140 boot will want immediate translation of body action to the ski and will be confident that their technique is precise and that no inadvertent body wobbles are going to happen. ..........On the other hand, an 80 flex boot's spine will flex easily, even if the skier is going slow with skis flat. A cautious beginner on low angle pitches learning to ski needs a softer boot that will flex when they make inadvertent body wobbles. The boots will absorb most of those movements as it flexes, little levering will happen, and the skier will be safe from surprises from the skis. The absorption from the low boot flex will blunt the effect of the skier's lack of control over shin tilt and where their body weight is relative to the ski's length. ........A boot with a flex somewhere in between 140 and 80 is what most recreational skiers need. How high you want to go depends on how much absorption you want before the tips get levered downward. And that depends on what kind of conditions you ski, how fast you want to ski, how high you are getting your edge angles, how much your weigh, and how precise your movements are. Choosing to go one or two steps higher in boot flex with each new boot you buy as your skiing improves is the way to go. Advice from seasoned skiers who have seen your skiing is often helpful.

--Altering a boot's flex
A boot cannot easily be made stiffer in flex. An after-market liner ($$) can maybe add some stiffness. .......A stiff boot can be temporarily softened by loosening the cuff or by removing one of the screws in the spine. It can permanently be made softer by a bootfitter cutting into the shell in various ways.

Hope that helps.
 
Last edited:

flyingsquirrel

Certified Ski Diva
Some random things about boot flex in general. I'll use "you" but not to mean anyone in particular.

--Diagnosing whether your flex is too low
If you ski on warm days when the snow gets dense and wet, you'll find out real fast whether your boot flex is too soft. The snow will press back on the fronts of the skis, which will force the shins into the tongues. No problem, that's the way things work with skis and boots. But if the boot folds forward as this happens, then you are in danger of face-planting, and you'll be immediately aware of this. Boots should not fold forward so easily that the skier feels insecure about falling forward when the snow pushes back; if they do, the flex is too soft. ........All boots stiffen up in colder temps, but skiers ski in snow that changes continually. The boot should give you enough cuff support to keep your lower leg upright when the snow pushes back. It should go without saying that if the boot folds forward even in cold temps, then stiffer boots are needed. ........It's not only conditions reveal that boots are too soft. If you begin skiing faster with higher edge angles as your skills increase, an older boot may not offer enough support. If your skills increase and you start skiing cut-up crud, your old boots may not offer enough support. If you move from an area with champagne powder to the pacific northwest where the snow falls wet and dense, your old boots may need to be replaced with stiffer boots.

--Diagnosing if you are flexing the boot or just the tongue
Boot flex happens when the back spine of the boot bends forward. Stiffer boots with higher flex numbers have stiffer, thicker spines. If as you ski the spine doesn't bend forward but the tongue does, allowing your lower leg to tilt forward, that's not due to the boot flex. It's due to the fact that your lower leg moves forward in space, inside the cuff, away from the boot's spine. If you get a gap back behind your calf when you "flex" the boot, and it looks like you are moving the tongue forward but not bending the spine, then the boot is not flexing at all. The boot is not being used to its design specifications. Skiers buy Booster Straps and have them put onto the boot to replace the non-elastic power strap. The elastic Booster Strap binds the lower leg back against the spine securely so the skier can access the boot's flex potential.

--Diagnosing how high a boot flex your skiing requires
When the lower leg is firmly bound the the spine, and you bend forward at the ankle to hover your upper body's weight (including hips) forward over the front of the skis, the boot acts as a lever. It levers the front of the ski downward onto the snow. (You can stand in the boot in such a way that the tail stays pressed down while the tips are levered; that's another topic.) It's good to gain the skill of levering the front downward (aka "getting forward"), but too soft a boot flex can undermine the development of this skill. ..........A boot with 140+ flex will not flex at all unless the skier is moving with significant speed and edge angle. That boot's lack of flex maximizes the levering action, which is what the skier in that boot (often a racer) wants. A skier in a 140 boot will want immediate translation of body action to the ski and will be confident that their technique is precise and that no inadvertent body wobbles are going to happen. ..........On the other hand, an 80 flex boot's spine will flex easily, even if the skier is going slow with skis flat. A cautious beginner on low angle pitches learning to ski needs a softer boot that will flex when they make inadvertent body wobbles. The boots will absorb most of those movements as it flexes, little levering will happen, and the skier will be safe from surprises from the skis. The absorption from the low boot flex will blunt the effect of the skier's lack of control over shin tilt and where their body weight is relative to the ski's length. ........A boot with a flex somewhere in between 140 and 80 is what most recreational skiers need. How high you want to go depends on how much absorption you want before the tips get levered downward. And that depends on what kind of conditions you ski, how fast you want to ski, how high you are getting your edge angles, how much your weigh, and how precise your movements are. Choosing to go one or two steps higher in boot flex with each new boot you buy as your skiing improves is the way to go. Advice from seasoned skiers who have seen your skiing is often helpful.

--Altering a boot's flex
A boot cannot easily be made stiffer in flex. An after-market liner ($$) can maybe add some stiffness. .......A stiff boot can be temporarily softened by loosening the cuff or by removing one of the screws in the spine. It can permanently be made softer by a bootfitter cutting into the shell in various ways.

Hope that helps.

This is INCREDIBLE information, thank you so so much liquidfeet. You answered my question and them some perfectly, and I definitely feel much more educated about boots now than i did 15 minutes ago.

Your comments are especially interesting as I've noticed with the 120 flex boots that the power strap is much more substantial than the version on the 90s. I have a lot of ankle mobility and significant leg muscle (plus wider calves for my body frame) so I am definitely looking forward to hearing the bootfitter's feedback next weekend! I am now wondering if at my height, it would make the most sense to shave a centimeter off the top of the boot, which if i understand correctly, would both reduce the flex slightly and allow me better power transfer.

My partner has been skiing longer than he can walk and his father is long time ski-patrol. I am very much still new to the sport, but from their observations of my movement last season, it sounds like a slightly stiffer boot (though not as high as 120) would serve me well as I start tackling some increasingly technical routes.
 

flyingsquirrel

Certified Ski Diva
At 80% off, I would say it's worth the consideration (ordering, trying them on, and taking them to a bootfitter for evaluation). If the bootfitter thinks you made a mistake, I'm guessing you can return them?

Unfortunately, boot flex is not an easy thing to evaluate. It is a mix of skill, weight, height, ankle range of motion, and even some personal preference. This is where your bootfitter should be able to help evaluate whether or not the flex is right for you, and they should be able to give you feedback on if it's possible to lower it enough to be correct for you.
yep! they're from powder7 so I can return as long as they're not used / altered for a $7 shipping fee which I was very willing to take on! At $150, they're a price where i'm willing to shell out more for some advanced fitting and even consider getting them to a point where they're not perfect, but simply 'good enough' for a season or two before beginning the search again for something perfect.

As mentioned above, my current skis won't fit a 21.5 jr racing boot and as i'm currently in grad school, my strong preference is to just make do with good enough for a season before leaning in on a more extensive boot fitting and ski choosing experience once I re-enter the workforce (and have more $$!)
 

elemmac

Angel Diva
Some random things about boot flex in general. I'll use "you" but not to mean anyone in particular.

--Diagnosing whether your flex is too low
If you ski on warm days when the snow gets dense and wet, you'll find out real fast whether your boot flex is too soft. The snow will press back on the fronts of the skis, which will force the shins into the tongues. No problem, that's the way things work with skis and boots. But if the boot folds forward as this happens, then you are in danger of face-planting, and you'll be immediately aware of this. Boots should not fold forward so easily that the skier feels insecure about falling forward when the snow pushes back; if they do, the flex is too soft. ........All boots stiffen up in colder temps, but skiers ski in snow that changes continually. The boot should give you enough cuff support to keep your lower leg upright when the snow pushes back. It should go without saying that if the boot folds forward even in cold temps, then stiffer boots are needed. ........It's not only conditions reveal that boots are too soft. If you begin skiing faster with higher edge angles as your skills increase, an older boot may not offer enough support. If your skills increase and you start skiing cut-up crud, your old boots may not offer enough support. If you move from an area with champagne powder to the pacific northwest where the snow falls wet and dense, your old boots may need to be replaced with stiffer boots.

--Diagnosing if you are flexing the boot or just the tongue
Boot flex happens when the back spine of the boot bends forward. Stiffer boots with higher flex numbers have stiffer, thicker spines. If as you ski the spine doesn't bend forward but the tongue does, allowing your lower leg to tilt forward, that's not due to the boot flex. It's due to the fact that your lower leg moves forward in space, inside the cuff, away from the boot's spine. If you get a gap back behind your calf when you "flex" the boot, and it looks like you are moving the tongue forward but not bending the spine, then the boot is not flexing at all. The boot is not being used to its design specifications. Skiers buy Booster Straps and have them put onto the boot to replace the non-elastic power strap. The elastic Booster Strap binds the lower leg back against the spine securely so the skier can access the boot's flex potential.

--Diagnosing how high a boot flex your skiing requires
When the lower leg is firmly bound the the spine, and you bend forward at the ankle to hover your upper body's weight (including hips) forward over the front of the skis, the boot acts as a lever. It levers the front of the ski downward onto the snow. (You can stand in the boot in such a way that the tail stays pressed down while the tips are levered; that's another topic.) It's good to gain the skill of levering the front downward (aka "getting forward"), but too soft a boot flex can undermine the development of this skill. ..........A boot with 140+ flex will not flex at all unless the skier is moving with significant speed and edge angle. That boot's lack of flex maximizes the levering action, which is what the skier in that boot (often a racer) wants. A skier in a 140 boot will want immediate translation of body action to the ski and will be confident that their technique is precise and that no inadvertent body wobbles are going to happen. ..........On the other hand, an 80 flex boot's spine will flex easily, even if the skier is going slow with skis flat. A cautious beginner on low angle pitches learning to ski needs a softer boot that will flex when they make inadvertent body wobbles. The boots will absorb most of those movements as it flexes, little levering will happen, and the skier will be safe from surprises from the skis. The absorption from the low boot flex will blunt the effect of the skier's lack of control over shin tilt and where their body weight is relative to the ski's length. ........A boot with a flex somewhere in between 140 and 80 is what most recreational skiers need. How high you want to go depends on how much absorption you want before the tips get levered downward. And that depends on what kind of conditions you ski, how fast you want to ski, how high you are getting your edge angles, how much your weigh, and how precise your movements are. Choosing to go one or two steps higher in boot flex with each new boot you buy as your skiing improves is the way to go. Advice from seasoned skiers who have seen your skiing is often helpful.

--Altering a boot's flex
A boot cannot easily be made stiffer in flex. An after-market liner ($$) can maybe add some stiffness. .......A stiff boot can be temporarily softened by loosening the cuff or by removing one of the screws in the spine. It can permanently be made softer by a bootfitter cutting into the shell in various ways.

Hope that helps.
I love how you’re able to take something as abstract as boot flex and describe it in a way that is so easy to understand.
 

WaterGirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I have a lot of ankle mobility and significant leg muscle (plus wider calves for my body frame) so I am definitely looking forward to hearing the bootfitter's feedback next weekend!

If you have better than average dorsiflexion (or hyper mobility) you may truly need a higher flexing boot. This is a much over-looked assessment that directly correlates to flex, rather than your body size or strength. Please make sure your fitter checks for this.
 

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