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Had such an awesome private lesson!

brooksnow

Certified Ski Diva
@liquidfeet Thanks for that succinct description of pivot slips v. railroad tracks. I had never thought of them as two ends of the skiing spectrum. So true!

The thing that made a huge difference to me when I learned pivot slips was that I could then confidently turn down a narrow corridor without any forward motion just by allowing my skis to find the fall line. (Yeah, that "just" was a hard time coming!) Pivot slips are in a straight line centered on the boots.
 

BackCountryGirl

Angel Diva
Because we instructors are notorious for not knowing when to shut up, I'll add that pivot slips require the skier to release her edges while simultaneously moving the COM down the fall line, both of which are super important for carved turns, too. My daily warm up always includes pivot slips.
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
Because we instructors are notorious for not knowing when to shut up, I'll add that pivot slips require the skier to release her edges while simultaneously moving the COM down the fall line, both of which are super important for carved turns, too. My daily warm up always includes pivot slips.

Ohh maybe we should start a new thread where some of our diva instructors could go over what their warm up skiing consists of each day! I'd be super interested in knowing what others do to get going in the right direction on a ski day!
 

newbieM

Certified Ski Diva
Thanks @liquidfeet this is super helpful.

I was doing RRtx on cat tracks but what I was struggling a bit was this:

This drill is usually done on low pitch terrain because of the speed issue. Very precise control over edging, balance, and rotation (preventing it) is required to keep the tracks pencil-thin. Building the skills to make those thin tracks gives the skier precision control over edging, balance, and rotation that will be available for use in all turns.

How can I tell if a cat track is going to be low pitch the first time I go on it? On a particularly steep part I swapped to practicing side slipping on the inside of the cat track but I wasn't sure if that was the 'proper' way to be doing things.

I'm really still learning on how to read the terrain ahead of me and use the right technique for it.

I really had a fun time practicing falling leave on an un-groomed track with a ton of fresh snow to help go down someone else's track when it was too steep and narrow for me to make turns.
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Thanks @liquidfeet ....How can I tell if a cat track is going to be low pitch the first time I go on it?....

I once had a lady from India in a beginner adult group. She was on vacation in New England, and her family decided to go take a skiing lesson. It was snowing, and this was the first time she had ever seen snow. I was explaining something about uphill and downhill. She asked "How can you tell which is which? It's all so white!!!"

@newbieM, with experience you'll be able to tell just by looking.
 

MissySki

Angel Diva
I once had a lady from India in a beginner adult group. She was on vacation in New England, and her family decided to go take a skiing lesson. It was snowing, and this was the first time she had ever seen snow. I was explaining something about uphill and downhill. She asked "How can you tell which is which? It's all so white!!!"

@newbieM, with experience you'll be able to tell just by looking.

I LOVE that someone was willing to put themselves out there and try skiing when she’d never even seen snow!
 

liquidfeet

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
She was in a sari with a long overcoat. Her attitude was great, but I do have to admit she didn't take to the actual skiing very well. I blame the rental boots being too humongous on her narrow feet.

She loved the optics of the mountain being all white, with little cold white dots in the air and colorfully clothed people falling down all around her.

Don't you just love people?
 

BMR

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
She was in a sari with a long overcoat. Her attitude was great, but I do have to admit she didn't take to the actual skiing very well. I blame the rental boots being too humongous on her narrow feet.

She loved the optics of the mountain being all white, with little cold white dots in the air and colorfully clothed people falling down all around her.

Don't you just love people?
This must have been such an unforgettable experience for her. It reminds me of my trips to Thailand and Japan with hubby before we had kids. Riding an elephant for the first time, hiking in the local villages, and feeling like I am in a different universe. There are not too many places left like that today in our global world.
 

Iwannaski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
having worn a sari, just thinking about trying to ski in one is giving me anxiety. But isn't the human spirit great that an expert wearer could wear it and be fine doing anything in it?

Humans: we can be really dumb but we're also really cool.

Great slogan, right? :smile:
 

fgor

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
She was in a sari with a long overcoat. Her attitude was great, but I do have to admit she didn't take to the actual skiing very well. I blame the rental boots being too humongous on her narrow feet.

She loved the optics of the mountain being all white, with little cold white dots in the air and colorfully clothed people falling down all around her.

Don't you just love people?
This reminds me of the first time I ever tried skiing, when I was around 11-12. It doesn't snow in most of NZ so it was the first time I had ever seen snow. I actually hated skiing (it was a rubbish first experience, and it took a solid decade before I was convinced to try skiing again) so I gave up fast and just enjoyed sitting outside with very light snow falling all around me. It was still a lovely day :smile:
 

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