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Going to a wider ski

Louisianagirl

Certified Ski Diva
I have both Sheeva 9's and 10's and the top sheets are meh....... but the skis are really fun.
Try Moment Skis for great skis and nice top sheets. Such as...j
These are fantastic!!!!!! Thank you
 

Louisianagirl

Certified Ski Diva
Where do you ski most often? Are you using boots you bought as a beginner?
I ski in the Rockies most often, and I’m on my 3rd pair of boots….the second pair lasted a day: they were too short, too stiff? And bruised my chins to the point I cut my day short. I’m wearing a Nordica Speed Machine 85w presently.
 

Louisianagirl

Certified Ski Diva
I also have mixed feelings on Line skis. I know some people have loved the Pandora line. However, my husband and I own/have owned skis from Rossignol, Faction, Blizzard, Liberty, Moment, 4frnt and Line. Of all these brands, the construction of the Line skis seems the worst. His Pescados have literally never been used, and yet they're the only skis whose edges rust just sitting on the wall. And the edges are uneven in thickness, as if someone in the factory did a poor job hand-finishing them. Both his and mine are also semi-cap construction, so very thin in tips and tails - these are not early season skis, one tiny rock hit feels like it'll be a coreshot - which also means that they will not be damp or great in crud. All this being said, I have the Sakana not the Pandora, and both our skis are 20/21, so they may have improved since then. I'm curious if anyone has any updates.
Thank you for being so thorough! The Lines don’t sound like a gamble I’m willing to take.
 

Louisianagirl

Certified Ski Diva
I'm curious what put you on to Lib Tech
Honestly, it’s all about the aesthetics. I haven’t purchased them because I don’t think I could handle the size the pair I like come in, and they won’t do a one-off to switch the skin to another ski for me. I have found other local Colorado companies (Folsom, Meier, and Wagner) that will do a custom ski, but I don’t know anything about their reputations.
 

Louisianagirl

Certified Ski Diva
Welcome! Sounds as if you took to skiing quickly. Several questions come to mind. How did you decide on the length of the K2 skis? Where do you ski most often? Are you using boots you bought as a beginner?

I don't have any experience with the particular skis you are considering. As for width, my all-mountain skis that I take on trips to big mountains in the Rockies are 85 underfoot. After several years of taking lessons after rehabbing a knee about a decade ago (not a skiing injury), my technique is strong enough to ski those skis in 8-10 inches of fluffy powder. My ski buddy was an advanced skier back in the days of narrow, straight skis so I knew that wide skis weren't necessary to enjoy powder for someone who knew what they were doing when they couldn't see their skis under a foot of snow. I didn't become an advanced skier until after age 50 because of a long hiatus. Having moved to North Carolina in high school was great for life in general but meant I didn't know anyone who skied on a regular basis for a long time.
I hope to become an advanced skier at age 50! This is my year!
Your skis sound awfully short to me - I'm on stiff 156cm skis at 5'2" and 115lb (although it turns out with all my gear and boots on that adds another 10-12lb) and I suspect some of the stability you are wanting will be related to the length rather than the width. Generally with all other factors being equal, length gives more stability and width gives more float. I would be thinking that you should be looking at mid 160s at your height and weight.

More importantly, have you had a proper boot fitting and do you have your own boots?
yes and yes
 

Louisianagirl

Certified Ski Diva
How did you decide on the length of the K2 skis?
I got them at a ski recycle shop. So I had no other choice in that particular ski. The ski guru pointed me to a few and my lack of knowledge as a 2nd season skier went for the “pretty” ski. I was on a black pearl 88 149 (or 146?) and making this jump was a game changer for me!
 

elemmac

Angel Diva
@Louisianagirl - Based on what you've posted and the responses thus far, my recommendation would be to wait on skis. Demo early season and try out a bunch of different skis. Two things to remember as you're demoing...do not be afraid to size up, and do not judge a ski by it's topsheet. Write down notes on what model you skied, what length they were, and what you liked/disliked about them. From there, you'll have a really good idea of what types of skis you jive with, and which ones will leave you longing for more.

If you find a ski that you love how they ski, but hate the top sheet...there are probably other models out there that ski similarly, with different topsheets. I get it...pretty skis are nice, but if you're looking to continue improving (which it sounds like you are), getting a ski that matches your skiing is way more important.
 

Louisianagirl

Certified Ski Diva
I really like this idea...and I think you're right. I purchased my Armada's (that I'm now trying to sell) without testing them out. I thought I was safe doing so since I bought my K2s used, without testing them. Lesson definitely learned - Now I'm looking at specs a lot more critically and trying to match what I have in my K2s (at least on the tip of the ski width). All of the feedback that I've gotten has definitely lead me to where you just pointed....hold off and do some field research! Thank you!
 

chasinghorizons

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I got them at a ski recycle shop. So I had no other choice in that particular ski. The ski guru pointed me to a few and my lack of knowledge as a 2nd season skier went for the “pretty” ski. I was on a black pearl 88 149 (or 146?) and making this jump was a game changer for me!
Good lord, you were on snowblades lol!

I have found other local Colorado companies (Folsom, Meier, and Wagner) that will do a custom ski, but I don’t know anything about their reputations.
I would definitely wait to order a custom ski until you've demoed lots of other skis. At this point, you probably have no idea what you like - heavy, light, precise, surfy, playful, charger, damp, energetic, forgiving... Every ski is going to fall differently on the scales. You may fall in love with something completely different than you thought you would. It'll help to read reviews of skis you demoed, so you can get an idea of how these terms are applied (Blister is great).

Also, there's a lot that goes into ski construction. To really get the most out of a custom ski, it helps to know how all those factors interact. Width is just a small part of the equation now - flex, sidecut, rocker, taper, core materials, layup, mount point all have big impacts on how a ski feels as well. Companies can make recommendations, but the more specific you are about what you want, the better they'll be able to help you.
 

chasinghorizons

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
I'll check out that site, but I've heard "damp" a few times now...what is that referencing?
Ability to mute out variations in the snow. A "damp" ski has good suspension (like suspension in a car). But some ppl like feeling the ground under their feet, it gives them more feedback.
 

Louisianagirl

Certified Ski Diva
Ability to mute out variations in the snow. A "damp" ski has good suspension (like suspension in a car). But some ppl like feeling the ground under their feet, it gives them more feedback.
Ah! then a damp ski is definitely a preference. I don't like getting beat to death in crud...but I can't imagine anyone does.
 

chasinghorizons

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Ah! then a damp ski is definitely a preference. I don't like getting beat to death in crud...but I can't imagine anyone does.
Haha that's where preference comes into play... For some people, a ski that's too damp can feel dead, or boring, or just not lively enough. There's no accounting for taste.
Case in point, I would describe my Dictator 3 as stable, decently damp, but also very demanding and sometimes unforgiving. You would think you'd want an easy and forgiving ski, right? But the D3s challenge me to be a better skier. I have to be focused and on my A-game with them. But when I do that, they are such an adrenaline rush. I can go faster on them, on rougher terrain, than any of my other skis - they make it easy. I use them for charging down steep open terrain. But if had just been reading ski descriptions, they are not what I would've chosen. And on days when I want to kick back and take it a little easier, I have other skis.

So I guess moral of the story is, demo, figure out what you like, and then start building a quiver for different conditions, terrain, and moods. :ski:
 

NWSkiGirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Where do you ski? I'm in the PNW and our everyday skis have around a 100 waist. I don't think I'd go that wide if I lived east!

I agree - go with a longer ski now that you're a stronger skier. You'll have more stability at speed.

The K2s don't suit me, so it seems we have different tastes in skis. So I won't give you any of my favorites. :smile:
 

mustski

Angel Diva
A damp ski is like a smooth Mercedes Sedan. Then there are a the “sports cars” and a whole bunch of sportier models in between. There really are no bad skis these days. It’s a matter of preference of feel, preference of terrain, and normal conditions where you ski.

where do you usually ski and what is your preferred terrain?
 

chasinghorizons

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Ah! then a damp ski is definitely a preference. I don't like getting beat to death in crud...but I can't imagine anyone does.
Should also mention, the biggest factor in how damp a ski is, is how heavy it is. So you can see how damper isn't always better. Heavier skis may charge through crud and crap better, but they may also tire you out faster and feel more difficult to turn.
However, just because a ski is heavy in the hand, doesn't always mean it'll feel super heavy underfoot. You may see some skis described as having a "light swing weight" - this means they feel very nimble and easy to maneuver. I would describe my Liberty Genesis as being very damp, but also extremely easy to maneuver and turn - one of the reasons I love it so much.
 

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