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Getting fit for the season

#42
Speaking of core work, I'm doing a week of it, starting yesterday.
Day 1 - 60 min Pilates
Day 2 - 60 min Pilates (2 days of Pilates in a row--this could be challenging, let's see how that goes!)
Day 3 - 30 min core work with a cardio focus
Day 4 - 30 min weights with abs & back
Day 5 - 30 min core work with a cardio focus, similar to Day 3
Day 6 - 30 min HIIT workout + 30 min Pilates
Day 7 - 45 min weights with abs & back (I use 2 sets of light dumbbells, 3 lbs. and 8-10 lbs.)
 
#43
@newboots , is it possible you've got something else going on besides (alongside) the IT band issues, like with your sacroiliac joint or low back, hip strength and/or mobility, or glute strength?

It seems like that much pain as to keep you awake is counter-productive, and if the Epsom salt bath + Aleve doesn't give you relief, maybe the PT is hitting one spot too hard or missing something in the big picture.
 
#44
It’s depressing to find out how much further I have to go. I was just feeling good about my PT progress. Sigh.
Working on core strength, like 1-leg balance, is a process that takes a while. Especially after injury or when no longer a young adult. For me, I became much more willing to work on general fitness after a knee injury when over 50 because the payoff was more fun on the slopes. Hang in there!

Same patience applies to learning and/or improving ski technique fundamentals. When I first started having lessons with Walter at Massanutten, he told me that it would take a season or two to ingrain new habits related to stance. That was just the starting point. But I felt it was worth the effort even by the middle of the second season. Back then I wasn't skiing nearly as much as in the last few years.
 
#45
@newboots , is it possible you've got something else going on besides (alongside) the IT band issues, like with your sacroiliac joint or low back, hip strength and/or mobility, or glute strength?

It seems like that much pain as to keep you awake is counter-productive, and if the Epsom salt bath + Aleve doesn't give you relief, maybe the PT is hitting one spot too hard or missing something in the big picture.
It’s possible. I’ve never been known for my amazing fitness. And the sudden change in lifestyle when I retired was bound to create some issues.

I’ve talked to the PT and she is addressing the severe tightness in both legs. And doing gentle stretching, and suggested more baths with my guy Epsom. I got mysteries from the secondhand bookstore which can keep me in the tub for ages! We’ll see how this goes.
 

WaterGirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#46
@newboots ...
and suggested more baths with my guy Epsom.


++++ can use in shower also - I keep a container of Epsom salts in each shower- and use as a paste on affected area after a work out our possible injury and then rinse of after 5 mins .... I truly believe it helps mitigate overuse and injury.
 
#47
So I’ve had a couple of really busy weeks at work where I didn’t have the opportunity to do my normal gym routine at lunchtime. I’m super excited to get back to my yoga classes, but I’m not as enthusiastic about heading back to my usual TRX class.. Obviously this isn’t the time to want to slack off and rather I want to push more in the next couple of months ahead of ski season.

How do you kind of reset when your usual routine is leaving you less than motivated/enthusiastic?? As I said, I’m excited to get back to my yoga twice per week, so that’s not a problem, but I think i need something to switch up with TRX that provides some good cardio and core work..
 
#48
You already know you need to switch it up. Maybe separate the two into something that's cardio only like a bike ride, and do core work separately, for example Pilates?
 

Jenny

Angel Diva
#49
How do you kind of reset when your usual routine is leaving you less than motivated/enthusiastic??
Isn't it amazing how FAST you can get out of the habit and how long it takes to get into it?

I'm kind of excited (and also kind of dreading) the fact that, after Labor Day, one of my yoga classes is changing to a core class.
 
#50
You already know you need to switch it up. Maybe separate the two into something that's cardio only like a bike ride, and do core work separately, for example Pilates?
I’m thinking of trying a spin class, but kind of intimidated from things I’ve heard and never having tried it myself previously. I’m trying to do something that my gym offers because lunchtime is the easiest for my schedule (usually), unfortunately no pilates here.
 
#51
Isn't it amazing how FAST you can get out of the habit and how long it takes to get into it?

I'm kind of excited (and also kind of dreading) the fact that, after Labor Day, one of my yoga classes is changing to a core class.
Omg yes, it’s terrible!!

The yoga/core class sounds intriguing, you’ll have to let us know how it is!
 
#52
I’m thinking of trying a spin class, but kind of intimidated from things I’ve heard and never having tried it myself previously. I’m trying to do something that my gym offers because lunchtime is the easiest for my schedule (usually), unfortunately no pilates here.
A spin class is what I thought of for cardio. Nothing to really worry about, if the pace is too fast then can simply go slower or stop for a rest. Easy to do HIIT on a spin bike. I tried a spin class a couple times when I was trying to figure out how to get into better shape after knee rehab. Knew I didn't like running for exercise. But for me if I'm on a bike then I'd rather be on a recumbent exercise bike or outdoors.

I've been trying to do this short ski-related Pilates sequence at home at least a couple times a week since June. Instructor says it can be done daily. Really doesn't take long because the number of reps is low. I can feel the difference in what's easier and what still take effort. My fitness center doesn't offer Pilates classes either.

 

Abbi

Angel Diva
#56
I've started Pilates and I absolutely love it for targeting my muscle weaknesses (hips, glutes, back, abs). I joined a Club Pilates here, expensive, but they use reformers. Hopefully, this will prevent the dreaded osteoarthritis!
If you decide you like Pilates, consider looking for a studio with classically trained instructors. Whole different animal!
 
#57
Hi @Abbi , I think you're a Pilates instructor. I've done classical Pilates and Pilates-inspired workouts like Lagree Fitness (so not my thing!). How is Club Pilates different? Maybe like Wundabar, which sounds too much like the Lagree to be interesting.
 
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Abbi

Angel Diva
#58
Hi @Abbi , I think you're a Pilates instructor. I've done classical Pilates and Pilates-inspired workouts like Lagree Fitness (so not my thing!). How is Club Pilates different? Maybe like Wundabar, which sounds too much like the Lagree to be interesting.
Classical Pilates follows a pattern of exercises and order designed by Joseph Pilates. Pilates called the work Contrology, the art of body control. He described Contrology as ‘a complete coordination of body, mind, and spirit’. That intention is carried forward by many, I’m sure not all, classically trained teachers. Most classically trained instructors go through both teaching and an apprenticeship. My apprenticeship was 600 hours which was an adventure on top of a full-time job! The problem with Club Pilates, especially since it is a franchise which is more the reason of it than experiencing the classical work, is many instructors are taught a quicker how to, rather than taking the time to develop an eye to teaching individuals rather than more of a one size fits all program. I’d compare it to eating at a chain restaurant vs dining at a place with a highly trained chef. Nothing wrong with either, just more time spent learning, practicing with an eye to inspire individually.
 

Bookworm

Certified Ski Diva
#59
So far, I've noticed the difference in instructors: one, I assume, has been classically trained because of the way she focuses on form. Others, not so much. I took from someone in the past who went through the apprenticeship, but I didn't like her studio. It seemed set up more for private lessons, which I can't really afford.
Your right, though, but for now, I'm making it work for me.
 

Little Lightning

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#60
Mikalea Shiffrin is my inspiration. I could watch this video all day long.

The variety of activities and the intensity she moves at continues to amaze me. I hold my breath every time I watch her walk across the weights, then turn around and do them backwards.

I do similar activities 3 days a week with a personal trainer using the TRX, weights, slideboard, bodyweight, sled, agility and plyometrics, etc. I work out with him year round. I have to schedule my workouts before hand so I'm committed to showing up. During ski season I ski 3 days a week and train 2 days a week. I love this kind of training because I can do my outdoor activities without spending a lot of time preparing for them.
 

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