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Gardening

Christy

Angel Diva
Wait. What? NO NO NO!!

This is on time for us (it's actually been blooming for a couple of weeks). Snowdrops are blooming, crocuses are up, other bulbs are poking them stems up. But there is plenty of winter left in the mountains. I'm happy it is light at 5 pm, too.
 

Jenny

Angel Diva
It's beautiful, but I'm not sure I could do flowers and skiing in the same season. Not what I’m accustomed to at all. When I had daffodils, I worried when they got a little too far out of the ground in mid-late March.

ETA, what am I saying, I still have some, just in a different spot. Forgot about those.
 

Christy

Angel Diva
It IS a little weird, especially in April, when the skiing is still good and I come home to loads of blooming flowers and baseball. But think of the SoCal divas and their January tomatoes...
 

newboots

Angel Diva
My friend in Louisiana had a huge jasmine. I had never smelled anything like it! She hung a hammock in the midst of it - heaven!
 

shadoj

Certified Ski Diva
@kiki & @Jenny -- You'll probably want something showier, but I'm a big fan of native plants; most native species of rose are very fragrant, even though they are single-flowered and mostly pink :smile: The tradeoff is a low-fuss, hardy plant with easy access for pollinators. I have a nice Rosa carolina in my Minnesota side yard; mowing keeps suckers in check. The scent is heavenly for the ~3 weeks bloom.

Another option: My girlfriend "inherited" a William Baffin (old-fashioned semi-double climber/pillar rose) at her rental place, and it's done really well despite getting relocated in a July heatwave. Very cold hardy, long bloom time; plus, it's fragrant! Wish I knew a few more to recommend.

Crossing my fingers that the Japanese beetles are confused in their timing again this year. They were too late for my flowers last summer!
 

Jenny

Angel Diva
@kiki & @Jenny -- You'll probably want something showier, but I'm a big fan of native plants; most native species of rose are very fragrant, even though they are single-flowered and mostly pink :smile: The tradeoff is a low-fuss, hardy plant with easy access for pollinators. I have a nice Rosa carolina in my Minnesota side yard; mowing keeps suckers in check. The scent is heavenly for the ~3 weeks bloom.

Another option: My girlfriend "inherited" a William Baffin (old-fashioned semi-double climber/pillar rose) at her rental place, and it's done really well despite getting relocated in a July heatwave. Very cold hardy, long bloom time; plus, it's fragrant! Wish I knew a few more to recommend.

Crossing my fingers that the Japanese beetles are confused in their timing again this year. They were too late for my flowers last summer!
That’s what started the conversation. I was telling the other divas at zoom happy hour about being up at the Au Sable lighthouse, on the way from Pictured Rocks to Grand Marais, and there was just a heavenly scent from all of the wild roses growing there. If I could have something like that, I’d try it, but I need plants that thrive on benign neglect and good wishes.
 

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