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Do you call yourself a skier?

RachelV

Administrator
Staff member
#1
... Is it worth it with so little terrain open and very heavy wet snow coming? Usually the answer for me is absolutely yes, but I'm currently feeling pretty unmotivated. Blasphemous I know.. :laughter:
I really struggle with this! When I don't have the energy to get out for whatever reason, I feel like I have to like... revisit my WHOLE IDENTITY. It's ridiculous. I basically moved out west and bought an additional condo to make skiing easier, but when I don't feel like going I'm immediately all WHAT IF I'M NOT REALLY A SKIER???? :rotf:
 
#4
Okay, I know the original post was totally in jest, but I need to say something because I think it's IMPORTANT! :smile:

I remember attending this women's golf event that was all about teaching women to golf so that they felt comfortable participating in business golf events. And the female speaker was like "men call themselves golfers if they a game of golf like once a year, no matter how well they play." Whereas women feel like they have to be REALLY GOOD at golf to join in. So I am saying if you are here on this forum, a person who enjoys sking enough to seek out other women to talk about skiing with on top of, you know, actually skiing, you are allowed to count "skier" as part of your identity.
:ski2: ski on, divas!
 

RachelV

Administrator
Staff member
#6
I don't know that the original post was really in jest, but you are right, it's important.
Ha, yeah, not really in jest at all. I spent most of my 20s and probably the first half of my 30s identifying primarily as a skier. Anything else I might have thought I was, I was a skier first. Transitioning out of that a bit, despite living out west and having a place in the mountains and everything, has been challenging at times and a little weird. I'm sure this is a very common thing people deal with in all kinds of ways as they get older enough to have different phases of their adulthood or whatever, and I'm sure everyone who's 10+ years older than me is rolling their eyes a bit, but here we are. :smile:
 

ski diva

Administrator
Staff member
#8
Okay, I know the original post was totally in jest, but I need to say something because I think it's IMPORTANT! :smile:

I remember attending this women's golf event that was all about teaching women to golf so that they felt comfortable participating in business golf events. And the female speaker was like "men call themselves golfers if they a game of golf like once a year, no matter how well they play." Whereas women feel like they have to be REALLY GOOD at golf to join in. So I am saying if you are here on this forum, a person who enjoys sking enough to seek out other women to talk about skiing with on top of, you know, actually skiing, you are allowed to count "skier" as part of your identity.
:ski2: ski on, divas!
I agree with this completely!

I've never understood the deal of who gets to call themselves a skier. As far as I know, there's no membership card or attendance criteria. If you ski, you are a skier. Case closed.

Ha, yeah, not really in jest at all. I spent most of my 20s and probably the first half of my 30s identifying primarily as a skier. Anything else I might have thought I was, I was a skier first. Transitioning out of that a bit, despite living out west and having a place in the mountains and everything, has been challenging at times and a little weird. I'm sure this is a very common thing people deal with in all kinds of ways as they get older enough to have different phases of their adulthood or whatever, and I'm sure everyone who's 10+ years older than me is rolling their eyes a bit, but here we are. :smile:
Things change, and that's okay. I am not the same person I was in my 20's, 30's, 40's, whatever. And that's a good thing. No eye rolls involved.
 
#9
Ha, yeah, not really in jest at all. I spent most of my 20s and probably the first half of my 30s identifying primarily as a skier. Anything else I might have thought I was, I was a skier first. Transitioning out of that a bit, despite living out west and having a place in the mountains and everything, has been challenging at times and a little weird. I'm sure this is a very common thing people deal with in all kinds of ways as they get older enough to have different phases of their adulthood or whatever, and I'm sure everyone who's 10+ years older than me is rolling their eyes a bit, but here we are. :smile:
That is totally fair! I my 20s I used to identify as a Rockabilly girl and spent my time dancing in honky-tonks and wearing vintage sweaters and a scarf tied around my ponytail every day, and now in my 40s I don't -- identities change, and that's so normal! So I hope you don't feel like I was aiming my post too much at you specifically. More about the fact that women may tend to sell themselves short or feel like they need more expertise to justify claiming something as part of who they are and wanting to empower anyone reading along to embrace skiing as part of their identity if they choose, no burden of proof needed. :smile:
 
#11
I spent most of my 20s and probably the first half of my 30s identifying primarily as a skier. Anything else I might have thought I was, I was a skier first. Transitioning out of that a bit, despite living out west and having a place in the mountains and everything, has been challenging at times and a little weird.
Being a "horse person" was central to my identity for many years, but after a bad accident, I lost a lot of the driving passion that made that so easy. It just didn't fit anymore. I struggled with feeling inauthentic for a long time before I realized that I don't need to define myself as a horse person to enjoy spending time around the occasional pony. So I know some things about horses, whatevs, it doesn't mean I'm obligated to make it central to my existence. It was a huge relief when I was finally able to admit this to myself! No one else even noticed a difference, only that I was less broody all the time! :clap:
 
#12
More about the fact that women may tend to sell themselves short or feel like they need more expertise to justify claiming something as part of who they are and wanting to empower anyone reading along to embrace skiing as part of their identity if they choose, no burden of proof needed. :smile:
This is so true! I started skiing as an adult and it took me a long time to call myself a "skier" to others. I felt like that meant I needed to be of a certain skill level to call myself that, so I'd say something like "I'm learning to ski" or "I really like to ski" etc. I had a fear of calling myself a skier and then having others see me ski and think um yeah she can barely even ski! Not that I put a measuring stick out for anyone else mind you, this was just for myself. We are definitely all too hard on ourselves.
 

kiki

Angel Diva
#13
I call myself a skier though I know my enthusiasm outweighs my skill set by a long shot lol! Same goes for me as a “golfer”. I can get by on a ski hill or golf course and spend a relatively material amount of my “free” time and disposal income on them....
 

lisaski

Certified Ski Diva
#15
I don't believe one has to be "obsessed with skiing" to call one's self a skier. That said, I am obsessed. :smile: I have a friend who starts watching ski porn in August. That is one obsession. For me, it is always in my subconscious thoughts. I know this because I have had several dreams about skiing - usually during the summer when there is no opportunity to ski. The dream always follows the same pattern: I am excited with anticipation to get the the slopes and when I finally get there, I have forgotten something big, like my boots or my skis, or all the snow has magically melted, or, the lift is so far away that I cannot get to it. Crazy obsession!
 
#16
The dream always follows the same pattern: I am excited with anticipation to get the the slopes and when I finally get there, I have forgotten something big, like my boots or my skis, or all the snow has magically melted, or, the lift is so far away that I cannot get to it. Crazy obsession!
Can I like your comment twice? I have these same crazy dreams before the season starts!
 
#18
Absolutely.

It's 1:42 and we have already skied over 20000 vf. It's getting cloudy and slushy. My DH just admitted that "he has nothing to prove."

So we are sitting outside in the sun and will return home soon.

None of us have anything to prove. Just do what feels comfortable. We are all skiers.

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NewEnglandSkier

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#20
I consider myself a skier not based on how many days I get or skill level but based on how much I enjoy it.
I still also consider myself a "rider (horse person)" even though I no longer ride! I did it for so many years and it shaped who I am as a person and to an extent shaped my life outlook, so I can't just brush it away (plus I can always go back to it--I don't do it due to timing issues, not because I don't want to!)
Funny thing is, I'm also interested in photography, but I don't dare call myself a "photographer"--for that I just think of myself as someone who is interested in photography.
I guess I identify as a skier since it consumes a lot of my time!
 

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