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Do bindings really matter?

#1
I must be honest. I have never given bindings a second thought. Ever. I have always focused on the ski and just took whatever binding they came with. Maybe I am just uneducated which is why I am asking here. I will be demoing next season and wonder if I find the ski of my dreams, should I care what brand/style bindings are on them? My style of skiing that I like to go medium-fast using medium turns (I think). My day is usually blues to start, some blacks, then back to blues. I ski only in the Northeast and ski wherever Epic pass works. I am not a "hot dogger", no jumps, no park stuff, hardly any trees, just a frontside skier that likes groomers and who is turning 52 soon. I am 5-6 160lbs. Should bindings really matter to me based on the way I ski?
 
#3
The first three pairs of skis I bought had "system bindings." That meant I didn't have to deal with learning about bindings. That type of binding is more easily adjusted to assorted boot sizes, so it makes them easier to sell later on. Demo bindings are also easily adjustable but are usually much heavier.

For a bit of an introduction to bindings:
https://www.theskidiva.com/forums/i...now-about-bindings-alpine-aka-downhill.24028/

If you look around at the recent threads asking for advice about bindings for a particular situation, you'll see that there are a few brands that are recommended often. Like picking skis, there is no single answer but multiple options that all work just as well.
 

fgor

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#4
The only solid thing I've learned about bindings is that trying to choose a binding will just drive you insane.

Source: am certifiably insane after having to choose bindings for two of my skis so far (the others I didn't choose the bindings and am happier for it!!), especially since in both cases i was limited to what the shop had available due to steep discounts buying skis+bindings together, somehow the bindings I wanted were never available, it is very easy to obsess over complete nonsense. I ended up deep into researching binding elasticity and trying to hunt down delta angles before giving up and picking whatever looked reasonable. It is possible to find people who have had bad experiences with every single binding :laughter:

I bought warden 13 mnc for my latest pair of skis (santa ana 88), I haven't had a chance to try them yet but hopefully they're good. Like every other binding, I've seen people who say they love them and swear by them, and people who think they're rubbish :(

Just make sure the DIN range is appropriate and the brake width is close to or slightly wider than the ski underfoot width :smile:
 
#7
In addition to the points made above, I also look at the shape/system of the heel piece as it relates to ease of getting the boot out of the binding. I also read up a little on release safety claims in general.
 

Jilly

Moderator
Staff member
#8
All of the above, then maybe colour. If there are other colours available. Most of my skis come with a system binding, so not much choice there to start with. I was surprised when my Nordica SA's came mounted with a binding. Then I realized it was a demo binding as this ski was to be part of the rep's demo fleet.
 

lisamamot

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#9
Other than system bindings I have purchased Marker Squire, Tyrolia Attack 12 and 13, Look SPX 12, Tyrolia AM12, and Salomon Shift 13 (on my AT setup)...oh and a Marker frame biding (F12). I haven’t had a problem with any, but I gravitate towards the Attack 12 or 13. They are easy to find, come in various colors, and function well.

Some are sensitive to ramp angle - I don’t know if I am, but the Tyrolia Attack 12 and 13 have a pretty neutral angle. I believe the Tyrolia Attack 11 and Salomon Warden 11 have more.
 
#10
Binding knowledge is a classic, "you don't know what you don't know". You can read everything you want about bindings and **think** you know, but until you experience the nuances yourself, it's tough to really know.

My advice on bindings tends to be similar to what fgor said above:
It is possible to find people who have had bad experiences with every single binding :laughter:
^^^^so so so true.^^^^
Just make sure the DIN range is appropriate and the brake width is close to or slightly wider than the ski underfoot width :smile:
From a personal standpoint:
I thought I didn't cared...until I did. I would put on whatever binding I could get at a reasonable price, with the correct brake width and the correct DIN, and just ski it. It wasn't until I started building a quiver of skis and was able to ski different bindings back-to-back, I realized that the bindings do make a difference. Some bindings feel more "solid" than others, some are more responsive to my movements, some feel lighter, some are easier to get into and a couple have made me feel like I can't get out of the back seat (probably a outcome of binding delta and a small boot sole). But, it wasn't until I was able to try more than one manufacturer that I could really decipher what the differences were.
 
#11
When you are demoing skis, keep in mind that any skis that are sold flat will be mounted with a demo binding, as they can be adjusted to any boot sole length. Demo bindings have a much different feel. I purchased a demo pair of Head Wild Joy. The demo bindings felt like I was so high up and disconnected from the ski. I had new bindings mounted and it was day and night. I felt like I was riding in the ski as opposed to on top of the ski. Responsiveness was much better and I was getting more feedback.
 

tinymoose

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#12
I don't generally give much thought to bindings, other than I generally to stick to Tyrolia or Rossi/Look and avoid Marker. But this is just for ease of entry as I'm lightweight with a small BSL. I don't enjoy stomping and clomping to try to get into my bindings.
 
#13
Thanks for all the advice. I think I will stick with "I don't know what I don't know" and try not to go insane if I ever do have to pick out bindings (no promises, though:becky:). I have never had an issue with bindings but will be aware that they can affect the feel of the ski. Wish me luck in my search for new skis!
 
#14
Oh, man, I do not need another aspect of gear to obsess over -- I'm a cyclist for cryin' out loud!

When I bought my skis I just relied on the shop guy. I didn't even know that real big-girl bindings didn't come with the adjustment range. I have the Tyrolia AT 11, I think (possibly 12 or 13 -- I honestly can't recall. My DIN is 6 so unlikely to be an issue.) They are very easy to clip into and they feel more powerful than the ancient demo Rossis on my old skis.
 
#16
I have Marker Griffon and Squire demo bindings, some Look system bindings and some Tyrolia attack 13. I like the last ones the least even though I loved the skis when I tried them with Look demos. Hard to explain why, I'm just not quite in the sweet spot on them. I really didn't get along with the attack 11, they pitched me too far forward. I bought the 13's to replace them. So I guess I'd say I'm more of a Marker fan since they tend to have less delta, and I'll probably keep going with demo bindings so I can mess around with the mount point and loan them out to friends and family.
 

Mudgirl630

Certified Ski Diva
#17
Binding knowledge is a classic, "you don't know what you don't know". You can read everything you want about bindings and **think** you know, but until you experience the nuances yourself, it's tough to really know.

My advice on bindings tends to be similar to what fgor said above:

^^^^so so so true.^^^^


From a personal standpoint:
I thought I didn't cared...until I did. I would put on whatever binding I could get at a reasonable price, with the correct brake width and the correct DIN, and just ski it. It wasn't until I started building a quiver of skis and was able to ski different bindings back-to-back, I realized that the bindings do make a difference. Some bindings feel more "solid" than others, some are more responsive to my movements, some feel lighter, some are easier to get into and a couple have made me feel like I can't get out of the back seat (probably a outcome of binding delta and a small boot sole). But, it wasn't until I was able to try more than one manufacturer that I could really decipher what the differences were.
So, what do you like? Thanks
 

fgor

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#18
Binding knowledge is a classic, "you don't know what you don't know". You can read everything you want about bindings and **think** you know, but until you experience the nuances yourself, it's tough to really know.
Exactly! In the end, I don't actually know what my binding preferences are, I have no issues with balance on any of my current skis (look nx12 and pivot12) and I've demoed a lot of skis which, looking at the photos I took on the days, had a mix of look, tyrolia, and marker bindings. The only ski I truly disliked, where I felt like I couldn't balance at all, had some demo binding I've never heard of (Fischer RS10). I spent one run on that fighting the fore-aft balance then handed the ski back with relief, but I'll never know exactly what was wrong with that one!

I have been avoiding the attack 11 out of principle since I've heard of too many small-booted people who find the delta excessive on those.

I do still occasionally agonise over the bindings I ended up with for my latest pair of skis, the bindings that were on the demo ski I tried weren't available to me when I bought the ski, and aside from some quirks like the attack 11 (maybe the warden 11 non-mnc? not sure), the rest of the commonly available bindings have surprisingly similar toe-heel delta. It seems like marker has a flat or negative delta on the TCX demo bindings but not the non-demo royal bindings. Overall stack height is certainly different between bindings, but I do not know what my personal preferences are there despite many demoing :smile:

The EASIEST binding I've ever clicked into was a tyrolia joy 11, system bindings that come with head total joy skis. Super easy step in and very satisfying clunk. I assumed these were the same as head aattack bindings but I've actually never found aattack demos to be anything special when it comes to step in. In fact I had some real effort stepping into the aattack demo bindings on the head kores that I demoed, which doesn't mesh at all with everything I've heard about those bindings, so who knows :noidea:
 

Iwannaski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#19
I will say, the click is really important/satisfying.

I think I posted the story about the learning snowboarder who blindsided me from behind and knocked me over. As I was yelling at him while standing back up, I enjoyed punctuating my scolding with the clicks from my bindings (the system bindings on the Cloud 9s - M10s I believe) ... I think it helped the scolding that I was able to stand up and reassemble without struggling. A little more weight to the chat, if you will.

:laughter:
 

fgor

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#20
I will say, the click is really important/satisfying.
That's the one thing I dislike about my pivots, they don't really have much of a click at all, and I have to look at the brakes to check that I'm properly clicked in :rolleyes:

I think I posted the story about the learning snowboarder who blindsided me from behind and knocked me over. As I was yelling at him while standing back up, I enjoyed punctuating my scolding with the clicks from my bindings (the system bindings on the Cloud 9s - M10s I believe) ... I think it helped the scolding that I was able to stand up and reassemble without struggling. A little more weight to the chat, if you will.

:laughter:
I love this!!! :laughter:
 

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