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Dipping my toes in- resort uphill

RJ*

Angel Diva
You should really try on the Tecnica Zero G Tour Scout W. It will feel a lot like your Mach1. it's just a hair wider last but you will want that for the UP. (I do not believe it is a true 22.5 if that's your size which was 273 BSL same as the 23.5) --

FWIW I was added to that Facebook group a few weeks ago - may want to try agin.
Thanks for the feedback. If that’s the case then I might actually just order a pair and try it at home. I was eventually added to the group- thanks. I think I might prefer spending a little more on a boot that I can return if the fit feels totally off at home.
 

RJ*

Angel Diva
Thank you everyone for the great feedback. I think I know where to start at least with the boots, and will go from there!
 

Mary Brosnan

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Thank you everyone for the great feedback. I think I know where to start at least with the boots, and will go from there!
I have fairly low volume feet and the Tecnica Zero G boots were too wide and loose for me. I tried multiple sizes but could not make them work. I ended up going with the Scarpa Quattro XT which I found to be a better fit around my heels and ankles.
 

WaterGirl

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
@Mary Brosnan are you a 22 by chance? That tecnica boot is not a true 22.5. The quatro and the fischer transalp are more narrow boots.
 
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echo_VT

Angel Diva
If you know you will tour and spend a significant amount of time outside going up, I definitely would recommend a dedicated uphill set up. You'll be able to do more runs with whatever fitness you have. If you're on the east coast, I would not get a 94 width.

I have a side country set up in the event I want to skin with burlier skis and a legit downhill binding, and I have two dedicated uphill touring setups. I am always looking for ways to shed weight so I can ski more. The one thing I regret on them is that they (dedicated uphill setups) are both wide. One's a 88 and the other is 106 (mainly for BC powder). If I could get another set up I would go 68-80 underfoot to shed more weight.

And I have one dedicated downhill (it's a race ski). Can you tell I really like going up? :smile: I don't do it enough but that's where I wanna be.
 

snoWYmonkey

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
If you are planning on in bounds touring then a full ST setup makes sense. If the primary focus is veryvlow angle zero avi risk solo outings withnyour dog you might want to look at wide cross country full metal edge touring skis as the boots are much more comfortable. Totally different pursuits amd pricing.

Be cautious and aware of your dog as leg lacerations from ski edges are super common and nasty.
 

RJ*

Angel Diva
If you are after LV boots, I've got super skinny ankles, and flat feet. I found the Celeste roomy but have got on with 2 generations of scarpa Gea - worth a look. I guess if you are do it purely for fitness, the heavier the gear the better ;-) but seriously you will enjoy it more and open up more routes if you get dedicated or at least touring leaning skis, tech bindings and compatible boots. As above - seek out some used gear to try it out, it's always resaleable unless you absolutely trash it.
The Scarpa GEA has fit perfectly. I tried a bunch of boots and settled on the Gea RS because it has a flex that I hope will be closer to my resort boots if I compare it to the Gea at 100 flex. I am amazed at how snug they fit and those Intuition liners are awesome. My next resort boot might end up being a Scarpa!

@arbusch I got on the FB group, so now I'm waiting to see if I can find skis/bindings/skins at a good price! Good deals do seem to go fast, so at least I feel better that I could get a decent resale price if needed.
 

RJ*

Angel Diva
If you know you will tour and spend a significant amount of time outside going up, I definitely would recommend a dedicated uphill set up. You'll be able to do more runs with whatever fitness you have. If you're on the east coast, I would not get a 94 width.

I have a side country set up in the event I want to skin with burlier skis and a legit downhill binding, and I have two dedicated uphill touring setups. I am always looking for ways to shed weight so I can ski more. The one thing I regret on them is that they (dedicated uphill setups) are both wide. One's a 88 and the other is 106 (mainly for BC powder). If I could get another set up I would go 68-80 underfoot to shed more weight.

And I have one dedicated downhill (it's a race ski). Can you tell I really like going up? :smile: I don't do it enough but that's where I wanna be.
I am in Taos. I would actually prefer a narrower ski (my favorite skis have an 80mm waist), but I am concerned about needing the width even in the resort depending on which runs I get to ski down. I have demoed the Blaze 94 and I would think it's versatile and light enough, but what do I know? I never toured before. :smile:

I am feeling a little hesitant in getting equipment that is too lightweight. In general, I feel safe skiing my stiff heavy boots/skis and the thought of not having that safety net is making me a little nervous. But I am sure I will get used to the change.
 

RJ*

Angel Diva
If you are planning on in bounds touring then a full ST setup makes sense. If the primary focus is veryvlow angle zero avi risk solo outings withnyour dog you might want to look at wide cross country full metal edge touring skis as the boots are much more comfortable. Totally different pursuits amd pricing.

Be cautious and aware of your dog as leg lacerations from ski edges are super common and nasty.
I will start by just going uphill in the early morning in the resort, without my dog. I might not end up doing anything beyond that. Thank you for pointing out the risks of bringing him with me, that is definitely something to think about.
 

RJ*

Angel Diva
Update on gear hunt: got my hands on a pair of Salomon Shift bindings as well as climbing skis on sale. I have a pair of SA93 skis with old demo bindings on them, so I am thinking of mounting the Shifts on these skis just to get started before season is over. I know it's a heavy-ish ski and definitely not ideal.

I hope the set up won't be so heavy that I will end up hating the experience!
 

echo_VT

Angel Diva
I am in Taos. I would actually prefer a narrower ski (my favorite skis have an 80mm waist), but I am concerned about needing the width even in the resort depending on which runs I get to ski down. I have demoed the Blaze 94 and I would think it's versatile and light enough, but what do I know? I never toured before. :smile:

I am feeling a little hesitant in getting equipment that is too lightweight. In general, I feel safe skiing my stiff heavy boots/skis and the thought of not having that safety net is making me a little nervous. But I am sure I will get used to the change.
I don't know what Taos skis like in relation to east coast. If you've never toured before, can you demo touring set ups, including the Blaze 94 ? I'm taking your reference to demo'ing Blaze 94 to downhill demo if you've never toured before -- do I have that right?

For heavy boots and skis, it will limit your tour. in terms of how much vertical feet you can do in a set time frame. You can do lower angle stuff but in powder, it will be additional work on the way down. To me, it seems worth it to push on the way up in order to enjoy the downhill. Also, everyone is different in terms of preferences.

Here is something I got from a hut in Europe:
"For the advanced group: good grasp of uphill travel, skiing/riding in variable snow conditions, and confidence on steep (up to 40 degree) descents and in tight trees.
Fitness? Important: training will be required. For the advanced group, you should be able to do a minimum of 4,000 feet of climbing per day at a minimum pace of 900 feet per hour."

That is the lowest I've heard though. The places I know of that aim for about 1300 ft per hour up to 1800 ft per hour. i.e. roughly 5000-8000 ft vertical per day for a full day tour. 2500 ft to 3500 ft vertical for a half day tour.
 

RJ*

Angel Diva
I don't know what Taos skis like in relation to east coast. If you've never toured before, can you demo touring set ups, including the Blaze 94 ? I'm taking your reference to demo'ing Blaze 94 to downhill demo if you've never toured before -- do I have that right?

For heavy boots and skis, it will limit your tour. in terms of how much vertical feet you can do in a set time frame. You can do lower angle stuff but in powder, it will be additional work on the way down. To me, it seems worth it to push on the way up in order to enjoy the downhill. Also, everyone is different in terms of preferences.

Here is something I got from a hut in Europe:
"For the advanced group: good grasp of uphill travel, skiing/riding in variable snow conditions, and confidence on steep (up to 40 degree) descents and in tight trees.
Fitness? Important: training will be required. For the advanced group, you should be able to do a minimum of 4,000 feet of climbing per day at a minimum pace of 900 feet per hour."

That is the lowest I've heard though. The places I know of that aim for about 1300 ft per hour up to 1800 ft per hour. i.e. roughly 5000-8000 ft vertical per day for a full day tour. 2500 ft to 3500 ft vertical for a half day tour.
I demoed the Blaze for downhill, correct. I don’t know that I can find a pair to demo with touring bindings, I’m gonna have to ask around.

The idea is to get started before season is over with the SA 93, and go out a couple of times just to try this out. The plan is to get a lighter ski next season, in addition to avy gear and training.
 

echo_VT

Angel Diva
It sounds like you’re on your way to making a decision (or have already). Let us know what you end up demo’ing/buying!
 
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arbusch

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
Glad you found boots you like. I think putting touring bindings on old pair of skis to get started would work and a great way to dip your toes. If you liked volkl blaze 95 inbound, you will like them as a touring setup. They are considered a 50/50 ski.

Yes, Items go fast on the fb group. Good luck!
 

RJ*

Angel Diva
Another update on the gear hunt. I saw the Blaze 94 on sale on Powder7 and remembered that they take trades. So I traded a pair of skis I have, and ended up ordering the Blaze. So my set up is Scarpa Gea RS boots + Salomon Shift 13 bindings + Volkl Blaze 94 in 158 cm. Can’t wait to get out hopefully this weekend or next week! I’ll report back.

Thank you everyone for your advice. I was really overwhelmed and at one point felt like I was never going to be able to make a decision. This thread was so helpful!
 

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