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Dancers?

mustski

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#21
I teach musical theater so - that part of dance in part of my life. I just started with a new doc due to a change in health insurance. He asked about activity level and I admitted that I skipped my swimming regimen this summer, but I addressed the dancing/skiing activity part of my life. He asked, "what is the chance we could get you to take a 25 minute walk a day?" I looked at him and directly stated - ZERO. I already easily walk that without sitting down for 6 hours a day, choreograph dances and dance 2 hours a day, and ski on weekends. Granted, the dance is not necessarily aerobic during choreo segments, but it still beat the heck out of a 25 minute walk!
 
#22
I have friends in Cali that are very much into dance; west coast swing, lindy, etc. I went with them once and had a blast. DH isn't remotely interested in dancing so I'd have to do this on my own which is fine. Can someone go to classes by themselves and get paired up for the class?
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#23
I have friends in Cali that are very much into dance; west coast swing, lindy, etc. I went with them once and had a blast. DH isn't remotely interested in dancing so I'd have to do this on my own which is fine. Can someone go to classes by themselves and get paired up for the class?
I'm sure it depends on the specific class, but I know most of the class descriptions I see state that you don't need a partner. You should be able to find classes that work that way anyway!
 

heather matthews

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#24
This year I started salsa.It is so much fun.My partner doesn't dance so I go on my own.There are social evenings too where you can practice the moves you have been learning.It has been great just to see everyone progressing through the class and starting to relax and enjoy the movement.At the beginning the looks of intense concentration,staring at our feet as though giving them a hard stare would make them do what they were supposed to, was priceless.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#25
This year I started salsa.It is so much fun.My partner doesn't dance so I go on my own.There are social evenings too where you can practice the moves you have been learning.It has been great just to see everyone progressing through the class and starting to relax and enjoy the movement.At the beginning the looks of intense concentration,staring at our feet as though giving them a hard stare would make them do what they were supposed to, was priceless.
:smile: I know that feeling. Also - I have such a hard time not making faces or white knuckling the barre when doing developpes and such in ballet that it makes me laugh. Like the strength is coming from my face or finger grip.

And from what little I've done of salsa, I'm SURE I was staring at my feet! It's one of those things that we started at half speed and I was like okay, I think I've got it. Brought it up to regular speed and... I have no idea what's going on! I'm sure we will have more salsa classes again on my trip to Costa Rica this Jan. :smile:
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#27
So this past weekend was our ballet performance of Cinderella. There are something like 100 young dancers in the performance and 12 adults. The adult women's class were the "Spanish Ladies" and we came into the ball and did a little 2 minute dance. We also had an entrance scene, which was maybe 30 seconds. So nothing too crazy EXCEPT, that I did it in pointe shoes, after about 4 months of experience with them. So - terrifying, honestly! Not that our dance was super challenging, and I was in the second row, which had (easier) alternate choreography - so our ladies with like 15 years of experience could show off a bit! I managed to pull off a handful of pique arabesques, moved forward in a bourree for about 5 feet, completed a series of echapees, and a few chaine turns on pointe - and did not fall over, run into anyone or flee the stage, so I guess it all went pretty well! Hahaha.

(and... I have no idea how to type accents on my computer!)

But here is my picture day photo. Last year I didn't bother to get an individual photo taken, but haha, wanted documentation of being in pointe shoes. Even with our funny, very "Utah" costumes where you can't see my knees....
 

Attachments

merrydog

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#28
So this past weekend was our ballet performance of Cinderella. There are something like 100 young dancers in the performance and 12 adults. The adult women's class were the "Spanish Ladies" and we came into the ball and did a little 2 minute dance. We also had an entrance scene, which was maybe 30 seconds. So nothing too crazy EXCEPT, that I did it in pointe shoes, after about 4 months of experience with them. So - terrifying, honestly! Not that our dance was super challenging, and I was in the second row, which had (easier) alternate choreography - so our ladies with like 15 years of experience could show off a bit! I managed to pull off a handful of pique arabesques, moved forward in a bourree for about 5 feet, completed a series of echapees, and a few chaine turns on pointe - and did not fall over, run into anyone or flee the stage, so I guess it all went pretty well! Hahaha.
Altagirl this is fabulous. Sounds like you had fun doing the performance and showed off quite a few moves after only a short time on pointe. Congratulations!:dancing:

I had to stop doing pointe work because of my neuroma but loved how it helped with ballet in soft shoes. I hope you keep it up.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#29
Thanks!!! It is amazing how much of it is a combo of head games and adaptation to balance. Because it was REALLY not very long ago where our teacher said okay let's come to the center and bourree across the room and I (and all the other newbies) were like "ARE YOU MAD?!?!?!"

But - once I convinced myself to actually go for it, it was much less difficult than I imagined. But doing it under pressure was certainly a big step!
 

Olesya Chornoguz

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#32
@altagirl That is so cool! You look fabulous on pointe shoes! Funny you mentioned ballet - I just started taking adult ballet about a month ago and having a blast! It's a beginner I ballet class, but some of the combinations we do are quite challenging for me. I did several years of modern/jazz and a tiny bit of ballet as a teenager so some things are coming back and it's so much fun! The studio has adult beginner pointe classes - I was too intimidated to consider it, but now that I saw your inspiring example I may try to take pointe classes too. They have adult ballet class performances too - I won't be able to do one this year, but next year maybe! I wonder how taking ballet would change my skiing? I was dancing for years before I started skiing as adult so I wonder that dancing helps your skiing because of balance and coordination involved in dancing?
 

VickiK

Angel Diva
#33
That is so awesome, you look fantastic! You are always pushing the envelope and drawing outside of the lines. Inspiring.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#34
Thanks, everyone!

I think dance is great for you overall, between the coordination, balance and the mental challenge of learning choreography. It's probably great cross training for lots of things. :smile:

Needless to say, I totally recommend trying adult classes. I was really intimidated walking in there with no experience and a body type no one would associate with "ballerina", but I've found adult classes to be very inclusive and fun.
 
#35
Thanks, everyone!

I think dance is great for you overall, between the coordination, balance and the mental challenge of learning choreography. It's probably great cross training for lots of things. :smile:

Needless to say, I totally recommend trying adult classes. I was really intimidated walking in there with no experience and a body type no one would associate with "ballerina", but I've found adult classes to be very inclusive and fun.
Did you take dance as a kid? I used to have a side job doing bookkeeping for a dance studio, and loved watching the kids, especially the very young ones. They also had adult ballet and tap, which I wasn't able to watch practice, but was very impressed when I saw them in the shows. I often thought about taking the adult lessons, but was a bit intimidated as all had danced as kids, and I have never had a single lesson.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#36
Did you take dance as a kid? I used to have a side job doing bookkeeping for a dance studio, and loved watching the kids, especially the very young ones. They also had adult ballet and tap, which I wasn't able to watch practice, but was very impressed when I saw them in the shows. I often thought about taking the adult lessons, but was a bit intimidated as all had danced as kids, and I have never had a single lesson.
No, not at all. There is a mixture in the adult classes that I've taken. Some danced for a decade or more, others are like me and did no dance at all as children. Some danced from like ages 3-6 and don't remember any of it. And a few just never stopped! I have found it to be very supportive - people are excited to see people want to learn! And honestly, if they aren't happy to get a never-ever - go find another studio where they are. I will say it takes some searching to find adult classes sometimes - there are a huge number of dance studios in my area, and I'd say maybe 10-15% of them offer adult classes, but there are still at least 3 good ones (there was another that sounded good, but I had a tough time getting a hold of them to join), and two specifically cater to never-evers. The other is associated with Ballet West and they don't offer beginner classes, but say they will recommend other places to do beginner training as an adult.
 

altagirl

Moderator
Staff member
#37
@altagirl That is so cool! You look fabulous on pointe shoes! Funny you mentioned ballet - I just started taking adult ballet about a month ago and having a blast! It's a beginner I ballet class, but some of the combinations we do are quite challenging for me. I did several years of modern/jazz and a tiny bit of ballet as a teenager so some things are coming back and it's so much fun! The studio has adult beginner pointe classes - I was too intimidated to consider it, but now that I saw your inspiring example I may try to take pointe classes too. They have adult ballet class performances too - I won't be able to do one this year, but next year maybe! I wonder how taking ballet would change my skiing? I was dancing for years before I started skiing as adult so I wonder that dancing helps your skiing because of balance and coordination involved in dancing?
Talk to your instructor and see what their process is. I did last year's performance in technique shoes after just under a year of classes, and late last summer our instructor said a number of us were ready to work on pre-pointe training, so we did maybe 4 months of foot strengthening work(daily homework) and then she had us do an exam. She said she was impressed with our progress but she doesn't pass anyone on the first try - it's her opportunity to get people to fine tune things while she really has our attention. (not untrue...) So we did another 6 week or so of training and then had a re-test and then pointe shoe fitting! And you thought ski boot fitting was arduous... Our school director took notes on our feet and had the local shop make sure they had our guessed sizes and then we had one fitting. They needed to order up a size for me, which was a custom order since I have huge size 11 feet. They were supposed to order an 11.5 W for me but for whatever reason the shop ordered the 11.5 M... then my director called around and found the right size but in a very stiff shank up in another shop in the state, so I drove up and got those. Which worked to get started, but was too stiff, so I ordered a second pair of exactly the right thing straight from the manufacturer. Phew! Overall it took about 4.5 months to get into the right shoes (which I've had for maybe 2 months?). And then lots of playing around with various pads and spacers and cushions to get them pretty comfortable. On the bright side, I've had no blisters or damaged toenails or anything. Just sore feet and lower calves.
 
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merrydog

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#38
Did you take dance as a kid? I used to have a side job doing bookkeeping for a dance studio, and loved watching the kids, especially the very young ones. They also had adult ballet and tap, which I wasn't able to watch practice, but was very impressed when I saw them in the shows. I often thought about taking the adult lessons, but was a bit intimidated as all had danced as kids, and I have never had a single lesson.
If you have some idea of how the class flows from watching in the dance studio that will help. As Altagirl said, you should be able to find a studio that welcomes never-evers. Call and ask to speak to the instructor, they can tell you if their class is appropriate for you and if not, may be able to suggest another class.
 

merrydog

Ski Diva Extraordinaire
#39
Talk to your instructor and see what their process is. I did last year's performance in technique shoes after just under a year of classes, and late last summer our instructor said a number of us were ready to work on pre-pointe training, so we did maybe 4 months of foot strengthening work(daily homework) and then she had us do an exam. She said she was impressed with our progress but she doesn't pass anyone on the first try - it's her opportunity to get people to fine tune things while she really has our attention. (not untrue...) So we did another 6 week or so of training and then had a re-test and then pointe shoe fitting! And you thought ski boot fitting was arduous... Our school director took notes on our feet and had the local shop make sure they had our guessed sizes and then we had one fitting. They needed to order up a size for me, which was a custom order since I have huge size 11 feet. They were supposed to order an 11.5 W for me but for whatever reason the shop ordered the 11.5 M... then my director called around and found the right size but in a very stiff shank up in another shop in the state, so I drove up and got those. Which worked to get started, but was too stiff, so I ordered a second pair of exactly the right thing straight from the manufacturer. Phew! Overall it took about 4.5 months to get into the right shoes (which I've had for maybe 2 months?). And then lots of playing around with various pads and spacers and cushions to get them pretty comfortable. On the bright side, I've had no blisters or damaged toenails or anything. Just sore feet and lower calves.
Just because I'm a pointe shoe nerd, what did you get?
 

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